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Page 264

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

Sir, to me, and to many in Greece, it appears far more desirable that England should insist on the performance of all the engagements on the part of King Otho, than that the people, now under the curse of his Government, should be indebted to the French Chambers for justice, or that another insurrection should place them, like the Servians, under the sceptre of their co-religionists.
Here permit me to lay before the public the words I have just received from a citizen of Athens:
" When Otho came, the National Assembly of Argos was dismissed; the six thousand veterans of the army were disbanded ; an absolute monarchy was imposed, and a national debt contracted. Agood tyranny might possibly have been useful ; but ours has been despicably mean, flagrantly dishonest, and
injurious to every interest. The nationaliforce and the national legislature were taken from us ; and, that the minds of our youth may lapse into barbarism under the feet of a barbarian, twenty-five professors are now dismissed from the University."

Will any civilized Power, will even Russia herself, see and uphold, or even tolerate, this? Would it not be more advantageous, and less disgraceful, if the Greeks again threw themselves prostrate before their ancient masters, imploring their milder sway ? The Turks, always more honourable, always more observant of treaties, than any Christian Power whatsoever, would repay the money we forced the Greeks to borrow. It was not borrowed for their good; it was not borrowed at their request ; it was not borrowed even with their consent; and the whole of it has been applied, not to the consolidation of their liberties, but of their bondage. Our political and commercial interests go along with Greek advancement : and much of our stagnant money might find a current through the fertile lands of Greece. Nothing of this is thought about. But "is it not a piteous sight," I am asked, "to see Greeks, eighteen years after the glorious conflict of Missolonghi, emigrating into Turkey?" What answer can I or any Englishman give to this question. We can only meet it with another, which we hope may be consolatory to the unfortunate who depend on the Government of England. " Is it not piteous that brave officers should be disowned by it, and thrown upon the mercy of an Asiatic despot, as ignorant, as irreclaimable, as irresponsible as Otho ?" I have only one piece of advice to give the Citizen of Athens.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Sir, to me, and to many in Greece, it appears far more desirable that England should insist on what is performance of all what is engagements on what is part of King Otho, than that what is people, now under what is curse of his Government, should be indebted to what is French Chambers for justice, or that another insurrection should place them, like what is Servians, under what is sceptre of their co-religionists. Here permit me to lay before what is public what is words I have just received from a citizen of Athens: " When Otho came, what is National Assembly of Argos was dismissed; what is six thousand veterans of what is army were disbanded ; an absolute monarchy was imposed, and a national debt contracted. Agood tyranny might possibly have been useful ; but ours has been despicably mean, flagrantly dishonest, and injurious to every interest. what is nationaliforce and what is national legislature were taken from us ; and, that what is minds of our youth may lapse into barbarism under what is feet of a barbarian, twenty-five professors are now dismissed from what is University." Will any civilized Power, will even Russia herself, see and uphold, or even tolerate, this? Would it not be more advantageous, and less disgraceful, if what is Greeks again threw themselves prostrate before their ancient masters, imploring their milder sway ? what is Turks, always more honourable, always more observant of treaties, than any Christian Power whatsoever, would repay what is money we forced what is Greeks to borrow. It was not borrowed for their good; it was not borrowed at their request ; it was not borrowed even with their consent; and what is whole of it has been applied, not to what is consolidation of their liberties, but of their bondage. Our political and commercial interests go along with Greek advancement : and much of our stagnant money might find a current through what is fertile lands of Greece. Nothing of this is thought about. But "is it not a piteous sight," I am asked, "to see Greeks, eighteen years after what is glorious conflict of Missolonghi, emigrating into Turkey?" What answer can I or any Englishman give to this question. We can only meet it with another, which we hope may be consolatory to what is unfortunate who depend on what is Government of England. " Is it not piteous that brave officers should be disowned by it, and thrown upon what is mercy of an Asiatic despot, as ignorant, as irreclaimable, as irresponsible as Otho ?" I have only one piece of advice to give what is Citizen of Athens. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 264 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" Sir, to me, and to many in Greece, it appears far more desirable that England should insist on what is performance of all what is engagements on what is part of King Otho, than that the people, now under what is curse of his Government, should be indebted to what is French Chambers for justice, or that another insurrection should place them, like what is Servians, under what is sceptre of their co-religionists. Here permit me to lay before what is public what is words I have just received from a citizen of Athens: " When Otho came, what is National Assembly of Argos was dismissed; the six thousand veterans of what is army were disbanded ; an absolute monarchy was imposed, and a national debt contracted. Agood tyranny might possibly have been useful ; but ours has been despicably mean, flagrantly dishonest, and injurious to every interest. what is nationaliforce and what is national legislature were taken from us ; and, that what is minds of our youth may lapse into barbarism under what is feet of a barbarian, twenty-five professors are now dismissed from what is University." Will any civilized Power, will even Russia herself, see and uphold, or even tolerate, this? Would it not be more advantageous, and less disgraceful, if what is Greeks again threw themselves prostrate before their ancient masters, imploring their milder sway ? The Turks, always more honourable, always more observant of treaties, than any Christian Power whatsoever, would repay what is money we forced what is Greeks to borrow. It was not borrowed for their good; it was not borrowed at their request ; it was not borrowed even with their consent; and what is whole of it has been applied, not to what is consolidation of their liberties, but of their bondage. Our political and commercial interests go along with Greek advancement : and much of our stagnant money might find a current through what is fertile lands of Greece. Nothing of this is thought about. But "is it not a piteous sight," I am asked, "to see Greeks, eighteen years after what is glorious conflict of Missolonghi, emigrating into Turkey?" What answer can I or any Englishman give to this question. We can only meet it with another, which we hope may be consolatory to what is unfortunate who depend on what is Government of England. " Is it not piteous that brave officers should be disowned by it, and thrown upon the mercy of an Asiatic despot, as ignorant, as irreclaimable, as irresponsible as Otho ?" I have only one piece of advice to give what is Citizen of Athens. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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