Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 260

CHAPTER II
PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847

Review, from the generosity and genius of Macaulay. But in the days when Brougham and his confederates were writers in it, more falsehood and more malignity marked its pages than any other journal in the language. And here is the man who cries out he is wounded! the recreant who, screaming for help, aims a poisoned dagger at the vigorous breast that crushes him to the ground.
Had he no respect for the tenets by which he made his fortune? Has he none for a superiority of intellectual power which leaves to him superiority of station ? This eminently bad writer and reasoner brings an action for slander on many counts, at the summit of which is " because it is despicable." Now did ever man or eat fly at the eyes for a thing beneath his notice : and such is the meaning of despicable among us who have learnt Latin and who write English. What other man within the walls of Parliament, however hasty, rude, and petulant, hath exhibited such manifold instances of bad manners, bad feelings, bad reasonings, bad language, and bad law? They who cannot be what they want to be, resolve on notoriety in any shape whatever. Each House exhibits a specimen of this genus, pinned to the last pages of its journals. Such notoriety can in no manner be more readily attained than by suddenly turning round on one leg, showing how agile is old age in this step, and then appealing to you whether the Terpsichorist has ever changed countenance or colour, from youth upwards. Meanwhile the toothless jaws are dropping, on both sides,
the slaver of wrath and dotage.
How many things are published with impunity which are more injurious to a man's character, more detrimental to his fortune and interest, than a great proportion of those which the law calls libellous ! Suppose an author, who has devoted his whole life to some particular study, writes a book upon it; suppose it is in any manner displeasing to Lord Brougham, whether on its own account or the author's ; would he hesitate, has he ever hesitated, to inflict an irremediable wound? Dexterity in mischief is applauded; the sufferer is derided. Easily may a weaker, who watches the opportunity, trip up a stronger. Similar feats are the peculiar gratification of coarse and vulgar minds. Has no virtuous man of genius bled to death under the scourge of such a critic as Brougham ?

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Review, from what is generosity and genius of Macaulay. But in what is days when Brougham and his confederates were writers in it, more falsehood and more malignity marked its pages than any other journal in what is language. And here is what is man who cries out he is wounded! what is recreant who, screaming for help, aims a poisoned dagger at what is vigorous breast that crushes him to what is ground. Had he no respect for what is tenets by which he made his fortune? Has he none for a superiority of intellectual power which leaves to him superiority of station ? This eminently bad writer and reasoner brings an action for slander on many counts, at what is summit of which is " because it is despicable." Now did ever man or eat fly at what is eyes for a thing beneath his notice : and such is what is meaning of despicable among us who have learnt Latin and who write English. What other man within what is walls of Parliament, however hasty, rude, and petulant, hath exhibited such manifold instances of bad manners, bad feelings, bad reasonings, bad language, and bad law? They who cannot be what they want to be, resolve on notoriety in any shape whatever. Each House exhibits a specimen of this genus, pinned to what is last pages of its journals. Such notoriety can in no manner be more readily attained than by suddenly turning round on one leg, showing how agile is old age in this step, and then appealing to you whether what is Terpsichorist has ever changed countenance or colour, from youth upwards. Meanwhile what is toothless jaws are dropping, on both sides, what is slaver of wrath and dotage. How many things are published with impunity which are more injurious to a man's character, more detrimental to his fortune and interest, than a great proportion of those which what is law calls libellous ! Suppose an author, who has devoted his whole life to some particular study, writes a book upon it; suppose it is in any manner displeasing to Lord Brougham, whether on its own account or what is author's ; would he hesitate, has he ever hesitated, to inflict an irremediable wound? Dexterity in mischief is applauded; what is sufferer is derided. Easily may a weaker, who watches what is opportunity, trip up a stronger. Similar feats are what is peculiar gratification of coarse and vulgar minds. Has no virtuous man of genius bled to what time is it under what is scourge of such a critic as Brougham ? where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 260 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PUBLIC LATTERS 1843-1847 where is p align="justify" Review, from what is generosity and genius of Macaulay. But in what is days when Brougham and his confederates were writers in it, more falsehood and more malignity marked its pages than any other journal in what is language. And here is what is man who cries out he is wounded! what is recreant who, screaming for help, aims a poisoned dagger at what is vigorous breast that crushes him to the ground. Had he no respect for what is tenets by which he made his fortune? Has he none for a superiority of intellectual power which leaves to him superiority of station ? This eminently bad writer and reasoner brings an action for slander on many counts, at what is summit of which is " because it is despicable." Now did ever man or eat fly at what is eyes for a thing beneath his notice : and such is the meaning of despicable among us who have learnt Latin and who write English. What other man within what is walls of Parliament, however hasty, rude, and petulant, hath exhibited such manifold instances of bad manners, bad feelings, bad reasonings, bad language, and bad law? They who cannot be what they want to be, resolve on notoriety in any shape whatever. Each House exhibits a specimen of this genus, pinned to what is last pages of its journals. Such notoriety can in no manner be more readily attained than by suddenly turning round on one leg, showing how agile is old age in this step, and then appealing to you whether what is Terpsichorist has ever changed countenance or colour, from youth upwards. Meanwhile what is toothless jaws are dropping, on both sides, what is slaver of wrath and dotage. How many things are published with impunity which are more injurious to a man's character, more detrimental to his fortune and interest, than a great proportion of those which what is law calls libellous ! Suppose an author, who has devoted his whole life to some particular study, writes a book upon it; suppose it is in any manner displeasing to Lord Brougham, whether on its own account or what is author's ; would he hesitate, has he ever hesitated, to inflict an irremediable wound? Dexterity in mischief is applauded; what is sufferer is derided. Easily may a weaker, who watches what is opportunity, trip up a stronger. Similar feats are what is peculiar gratification of coarse and vulgar minds. Has no virtuous man of genius bled to what time is it under what is scourge of such a critic as Brougham ? where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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