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Page 252

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

This irritated Landor even more than careless writing, and, with other utterances, incited him to address another letter to the ExanaineY, printed in its issue of October 6.

The Misconduct of Lord Brougham.
Sept. 29, 1839.
SIR,
In your Examiner of this day you have forestalled a few of the observations which I was about to send to you, in the evening, on the late conduct of Lord Brougham. The remainder of what I wrote on his "Statesmen," some months ago, would occupy too much of your paper, and shall therefore be published separately. There are several points on which we do not quite agree ; and in these times of utter intolerance, I hold it very manly in you to grant admittance to the less congenial of my opinions. About Lord Brougham, however, no two honest men can differ, after your masterly exposure of his manifold contradictions. You speak out : I dare not say that I never found in any other author, ancient or modern, so much of insincerity and falsehood : I dare not say it, for Lord Brougham is a very great and a very choleric man; and I am a very humble and a very timid one : but I will venture to affirm that in none whatsoever have I found so much which I am unable to reconcile, by any process of ratiocination, with what I believe to be sincerity and truth. Again, I dare not say I never saw in any one so much of arrogance, impudence, and presumption; but with my hand horizontally above my eyes, and lowering them to the closest inspection, never have I descried what appeared to me so extremely like them. I may be asked if I think myself capable of setting right so great a personage. No, indeed. Great personages are never to be set right. This is the only criterion I know of greatness. Really and truly is it, like the globe we inhabit, ponderibus librata suis.

Had he been less mischievous, his abilities had been less noticed, although they have the pliancy and multiplicity of a polypus. But every man springs up from his seat to see an attack made against

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE This irritated Landor even more than careless writing, and, with other utterances, incited him to address another letter to what is ExanaineY, printed in its issue of October 6. what is Misconduct of Lord Brougham. Sept. 29, 1839. SIR, In your Examiner of this day you have forestalled a few of what is observations which I was about to send to you, in what is evening, on what is late conduct of Lord Brougham. what is remainder of what I wrote on his "Statesmen," some months ago, would occupy too much of your paper, and shall therefore be published separately. There are several points on which we do not quite agree ; and in these times of utter intolerance, I hold it very manly in you to grant admittance to what is less congenial of my opinions. About Lord Brougham, however, no two honest men can differ, after your masterly exposure of his manifold contradictions. You speak out : I dare not say that I never found in any other author, ancient or modern, so much of insincerity and falsehood : I dare not say it, for Lord Brougham is a very great and a very choleric man; and I am a very humble and a very timid one : but I will venture to affirm that in none whatsoever have I found so much which I am unable to reconcile, by any process of ratiocination, with what I believe to be sincerity and truth. Again, I dare not say I never saw in any one so much of arrogance, impudence, and presumption; but with my hand horizontally above my eyes, and lowering them to what is closest inspection, never have I descried what appeared to me so extremely like them. I may be asked if I think myself capable of setting right so great a personage. No, indeed. Great personages are never to be set right. This is what is only criterion I know of greatness. Really and truly is it, like what is globe we inhabit, ponderibus librata suis. Had he been less mischievous, his abilities had been less noticed, although they have what is pliancy and multiplicity of a polypus. But every man springs up from his seat to see an attack made against where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 252 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" This irritated Landor even more than careless writing, and, with other utterances, incited him to address another letter to what is ExanaineY, printed in its issue of October 6. what is Misconduct of Lord Brougham. Sept. 29, 1839. SIR, In your Examiner of this day you have forestalled a few of the observations which I was about to send to you, in what is evening, on what is late conduct of Lord Brougham. what is remainder of what I wrote on his "Statesmen," some months ago, would occupy too much of your paper, and shall therefore be published separately. There are several points on which we do not quite agree ; and in these times of utter intolerance, I hold it very manly in you to grant admittance to what is less congenial of my opinions. About Lord Brougham, however, no two honest men can differ, after your masterly exposure of his manifold contradictions. You speak out : I dare not say that I never found in any other author, ancient or modern, so much of insincerity and falsehood : I dare not say it, for Lord Brougham is a very great and a very choleric man; and I am a very humble and a very timid one : but I will venture to affirm that in none whatsoever have I found so much which I am unable to reconcile, by any process of ratiocination, with what I believe to be sincerity and truth. Again, I dare not say I never saw in any one so much of arrogance, impudence, and presumption; but with my hand horizontally above my eyes, and lowering them to what is closest inspection, never have I descried what appeared to me so extremely like them. I may be asked if I think myself capable of setting right so great a personage. No, indeed. Great personages are never to be set right. This is what is only criterion I know of greatness. Really and truly is it, like what is globe we inhabit, ponderibus librata suis. Had he been less mischievous, his abilities had been less noticed, although they have what is pliancy and multiplicity of a polypus. But every man springs up from his seat to see an attack made against where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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