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Page 251

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

it is true, has many faults, and grave ones. It has point without aim, and vigour without agility. Wit alone can long bear up the shafts of surcasm ; and the wit of Junius had only one leg to stand on, a stiff and swollen one. His flashy and figured invectives, like court-dresses, would fit half the court as well as they fitted the person they were made for; if, indeed, like the prefaces of Sallust and Cicero, they were not kept ready until the author had found or contrived a place for their exhibition. At the present day there are several newspapers, on both sides, written much more correctly than the letters of Junius; but it hardly can be said that "correct composition was little studied," although it was studied by few, in the times of Bower, Johnson, Burke, Goldsmith, Shipley, Hurd, Inchbald, Carter, Harris, Lowth, and Blackstone. For one inelegance or incorrectness in the least excellent of these, I could easily find seven in the most popular of those who are, coarsely but aptly, denominated the crack authors of the present day.
We have seen, indeed, no great writer since the days of the Commonwealth, yet several have written correctly and eloquently. The subjects of these are not of extent and solidity enough to comprehend the present, the past, and the future, but occasional and transitory, and their march does not require the excitement of the full band. Why will not some powerful man stand up in the midst of us, with his eyes direct on Bossuet and Massilon, resolute to compete with, since it is impossible to excel them. After the reading of these authors, it must be acknowledged that Cicero himself, in many parts of his various works, appears-I dare not say frivolous, I will not say vainglorious-it is enough to say, rhetorical and scholastic. There are matters, not of religion or politics, of high and lasting interest, and such as would amply and becomingly occupy the most powerful genius. The highest rank, whether in prose or poetry, is not to be obtained by doing small things well, but great things worthily.
WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR.

On August 6, 1839, in the House of Lords, Lord Brougham moved five resolutions against the Irish policy of the Government, and made a long speech in which he denounced Landor's friend, Lord Normanby.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it is true, has many faults, and grave ones. It has point without aim, and vigour without agility. Wit alone can long bear up what is shafts of surcasm ; and what is wit of Junius had only one leg to stand on, a stiff and swollen one. His flashy and figured invectives, like court-dresses, would fit half what is court as well as they fitted what is person they were made for; if, indeed, like what is prefaces of Sallust and Cicero, they were not kept ready until what is author had found or contrived a place for their exhibition. At what is present day there are several newspapers, on both sides, written much more correctly than what is letters of Junius; but it hardly can be said that "correct composition was little studied," although it was studied by few, in what is times of Bower, Johnson, Burke, Goldsmith, Shipley, Hurd, Inchbald, Carter, Harris, Lowth, and Blackstone. For one inelegance or incorrectness in what is least excellent of these, I could easily find seven in what is most popular of those who are, coarsely but aptly, denominated what is crack authors of what is present day. We have seen, indeed, no great writer since what is days of what is Commonwealth, yet several have written correctly and eloquently. what is subjects of these are not of extent and solidity enough to comprehend what is present, what is past, and what is future, but occasional and transitory, and their march does not require what is excitement of what is full band. Why will not some powerful man stand up in what is midst of us, with his eyes direct on Bossuet and Massilon, resolute to compete with, since it is impossible to excel them. After what is reading of these authors, it must be acknowledged that Cicero himself, in many parts of his various works, appears-I dare not say frivolous, I will not say vainglorious-it is enough to say, rhetorical and scholastic. There are matters, not of religion or politics, of high and lasting interest, and such as would amply and becomingly occupy what is most powerful genius. what is highest rank, whether in prose or poetry, is not to be obtained by doing small things well, but great things worthily. WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. On August 6, 1839, in what is House of Lords, Lord Brougham moved five resolutions against what is Irish policy of what is Government, and made a long speech in which he denounced Landor's friend, Lord Normanby. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 251 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" it is true, has many faults, and grave ones. It has point without aim, and vigour without agility. Wit alone can long bear up what is shafts of surcasm ; and what is wit of Junius had only one leg to stand on, a stiff and swollen one. His flashy and figured invectives, like court-dresses, would fit half what is court as well as they fitted what is person they were made for; if, indeed, like what is prefaces of Sallust and Cicero, they were not kept ready until what is author had found or contrived a place for their exhibition. At what is present day there are several newspapers, on both sides, written much more correctly than what is letters of Junius; but it hardly can be said that "correct composition was little studied," although it was studied by few, in what is times of Bower, Johnson, Burke, Goldsmith, Shipley, Hurd, Inchbald, Carter, Harris, Lowth, and Blackstone. For one inelegance or incorrectness in what is least excellent of these, I could easily find seven in what is most popular of those who are, coarsely but aptly, denominated what is crack authors of what is present day. We have seen, indeed, no great writer since what is days of what is Commonwealth, yet several have written correctly and eloquently. what is subjects of these are not of extent and solidity enough to comprehend the present, what is past, and what is future, but occasional and transitory, and their march does not require what is excitement of what is full band. Why will not some powerful man stand up in what is midst of us, with his eyes direct on Bossuet and Massilon, resolute to compete with, since it is impossible to excel them. After what is reading of these authors, it must be acknowledged that Cicero himself, in many parts of his various works, appears-I dare not say frivolous, I will not say vainglorious-it is enough to say, rhetorical and scholastic. There are matters, not of religion or politics, of high and lasting interest, and such as would amply and becomingly occupy what is most powerful genius. what is highest rank, whether in prose or poetry, is not to be obtained by doing small things well, but great things worthily. WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. On August 6, 1839, in what is House of Lords, Lord Brougham moved five resolutions against what is Irish policy of what is Government, and made a long speech in which he denounced Landor's friend, Lord Normanby. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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