Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 250

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

by all the kings of Spain was declared null and void. Whoever has lived among that incomparable people will heartily wish them success, and confidently augur it, against the most degenerate of men, the slothful, worn-out Castilians. It would be well if all Spain were free; but it is far more important that Biscay should remain so than that all the rest should become so. We know that Biscay, for thousands of years, has treated liberty as well as liberty has treated her; but we may shrewdly suspect from recent experience, that it will be long before the mass of Spaniards can be softened into humanity and moulded into freedom.

P. 87. "This wholesome lesson, and indeed useful warning, is above all required when we are called upon to contemplate a professional and political life so eminently prosperous as the one [Lord Loughborough's] which we have been
contemplating."
The word contemplate was not used formerly on low and trivial occasions. No corruption of a language is so pernicious as the employment of such expressions on such subjects, by which they become unfit for the higher. Gigantic, palmy, unearthly, &c., are now the mode ; and we may expect a succession of annuals from the hot-houses and steam of our novelists. ...
A specimen is given by Lord Brougham of Thurlow's wit. Another, I believe, constitutes all that ever was attributed to him. Bishop Watson, a great blusterer and boaster, and a defender of Christianity without a belief in it, had just presented his sermons to the King. He came to a dinner-party where Thurlow was, and began to expatiate on the freedom with which he had addressed his sovereign, when Thurlow turned suddenly round, and growled, " He said it ! G- d- him; he no more said it than he said his prayers." Chancery wit assuredly is not borrowed from the theatre of Moliere. . . .

P, 115. " Writing at a time when good or even correct composition was little
studied, and in the newspapers hardly ever met with, his polished style f_the style of Junius], though very far from being a correct one, and farther still from good
pure English, being made the vehicle of abuse, sarcasm, and pointed invective, naturally excited a degree of attention which was further maintained by the boldness of his proceedings."
Surely so languid and so perplext a sentence ought not to come forward [from] the castigator of Junius. The style of this writer,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE by all what is kings of Spain was declared null and void. Whoever has lived among that incomparable people will heartily wish them success, and confidently augur it, against what is most degenerate of men, what is slothful, worn-out Castilians. It would be well if all Spain were free; but it is far more important that Biscay should remain so than that all what is rest should become so. We know that Biscay, for thousands of years, has treated liberty as well as liberty has treated her; but we may shrewdly suspect from recent experience, that it will be long before what is mass of Spaniards can be softened into humanity and moulded into freedom. P. 87. "This wholesome lesson, and indeed useful warning, is above all required when we are called upon to contemplate a professional and political life so eminently prosperous as what is one [Lord Loughborough's] which we have been contemplating." what is word contemplate was not used formerly on low and trivial occasions. No corruption of a language is so pernicious as what is employment of such expressions on such subjects, by which they become unfit for what is higher. Gigantic, palmy, unearthly, &c., are now what is mode ; and we may expect a succession of annuals from what is hot-houses and steam of our novelists. ... A specimen is given by Lord Brougham of Thurlow's wit. Another, I believe, constitutes all that ever was attributed to him. Bishop Watson, a great blusterer and boaster, and a defender of Christianity without a belief in it, had just presented his sermons to what is King. He came to a dinner-party where Thurlow was, and began to expatiate on what is freedom with which he had addressed his sovereign, when Thurlow turned suddenly round, and growled, " He said it ! G- d- him; he no more said it than he said his prayers." Chancery wit assuredly is not borrowed from what is theatre of Moliere. . . . P, 115. " Writing at a time when good or even correct composition was little studied, and in what is newspapers hardly ever met with, his polished style f_the style of Junius], though very far from being a correct one, and farther still from good pure English, being made what is vehicle of abuse, sarcasm, and pointed invective, naturally excited a degree of attention which was further maintained by what is boldness of his proceedings." Surely so languid and so perplext a sentence ought not to come forward [from] what is castigator of Junius. what is style of this writer, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 250 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" by all what is kings of Spain was declared null and void. Whoever has lived among that incomparable people will heartily wish them success, and confidently augur it, against what is most degenerate of men, what is slothful, worn-out Castilians. It would be well if all Spain were free; but it is far more important that Biscay should remain so than that all what is rest should become so. We know that Biscay, for thousands of years, has treated liberty as well as liberty has treated her; but we may shrewdly suspect from recent experience, that it will be long before what is mass of Spaniards can be softened into humanity and moulded into freedom. P. 87. "This wholesome lesson, and indeed useful warning, is above all required when we are called upon to contemplate a professional and political life so eminently prosperous as the one [Lord Loughborough's] which we have been contemplating." what is word contemplate was not used formerly on low and trivial occasions. No corruption of a language is so pernicious as what is employment of such expressions on such subjects, by which they become unfit for what is higher. Gigantic, palmy, unearthly, &c., are now what is mode ; and we may expect a succession of annuals from what is hot-houses and steam of our novelists. ... A specimen is given by Lord Brougham of Thurlow's wit. Another, I believe, constitutes all that ever was attributed to him. Bishop Watson, a great blusterer and boaster, and a defender of Christianity without a belief in it, had just presented his sermons to what is King. He came to a dinner-party where Thurlow was, and began to expatiate on what is freedom with which he had addressed his sovereign, when Thurlow turned suddenly round, and growled, " He said it ! G- d- him; he no more said it than he said his prayers." Chancery wit assuredly is not borrowed from what is theatre of Moliere. . . . P, 115. " Writing at a time when good or even correct composition was little studied, and in what is newspapers hardly ever met with, his polished style f_the style of Junius], though very far from being a correct one, and farther still from good pure English, being made what is vehicle of abuse, sarcasm, and pointed invective, naturally excited a degree of attention which was further maintained by what is boldness of his proceedings." Surely so languid and so perplext a sentence ought not to come forward [from] what is castigator of Junius. what is style of this writer, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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