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Page 249

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

occasion he was called a hoary traitor by the shameless Scotsman. On his return he took off his coat, and folding it up carefully, thus soliloquized it. ` Lie there ! I will put thee on again, when yon cock crows lower.' . . .

P. 77. "[There can be no doubt that his object at all times was to gain]
That great prize of the profession
Which he at last reduced into possession."

Can we wonder that the best poets have been despised by such a poet as this ? To " reduce a prize into possession " is far above the flights of Milton.

P. 81. "[The Parliament of Ireland, it is to be remarked, did not, in the
earlier case, pursue the same course with that of Great Britain.] Our fellowcitizens, although dwelling farther from the rising sun, are more devotedly given to its worship than ourselves. [They ... at once addressed the Prince of Wales to take upon him the Government.] "
Here, in the first member of the sentence, the rising sun is really and truly that great luminary which we are in the habit of seeing, more or less, several days in the year ; in the second it is a metaphor, in allusion to that effeminate and heartless wretch, whom, in scorn to antiquity, and in wrong even to profligacy itself, we call our Sardanapalus. Part of a sentence ought never to be composed of metaphor and the other part of that whence the metaphor is drawn. When we set the jewel we remove the plasma. ...

P. 83. "The marriage de facto, legal or illegal, which he [the Prince of Wales] had contracted with a Catholic lady, &c."
Mr Fox declared in the House of Commons that no such marriage was contracted. He knew the contrary; and Mr Errington, the relative of the lady, told Mr Fox that the Prince, and whoever else denied it, lied.

P. 83. "[A disputed succession and] intestine tumults such as she [England]
had not experienced since the days of the two roses."
Spain, I believe, is the only country in Europe in which such tumults as those under the two roses can be excited by a similar cause at the present day. And those are mistaken who imagine that a king or a queen is the object of contention in that country. The ancient rights of the Biscayans were violated by the central government, and an independence which had been acknowledged and respected

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE occasion he was called a hoary traitor by what is shameless Scotsman. On his return he took off his coat, and folding it up carefully, thus soliloquized it. ` Lie there ! I will put thee on again, when yon cock crows lower.' . . . P. 77. "[There can be no doubt that his object at all times was to gain] That great prize of what is profession Which he at last reduced into possession." Can we wonder that what is best poets have been despised by such a poet as this ? To " reduce a prize into possession " is far above what is flights of Milton. P. 81. "[The Parliament of Ireland, it is to be remarked, did not, in what is earlier case, pursue what is same course with that of Great Britain.] Our fellowcitizens, although dwelling farther from what is rising sun, are more devotedly given to its worship than ourselves. [They ... at once addressed what is Prince of Wales to take upon him what is Government.] " Here, in what is first member of what is sentence, what is rising sun is really and truly that great luminary which we are in what is habit of seeing, more or less, several days in what is year ; in what is second it is a metaphor, in allusion to that effeminate and heartless wretch, whom, in scorn to antiquity, and in wrong even to profligacy itself, we call our Sardanapalus. Part of a sentence ought never to be composed of metaphor and what is other part of that whence what is metaphor is drawn. When we set what is jewel we remove what is plasma. ... P. 83. "The marriage de facto, legal or illegal, which he [the Prince of Wales] had contracted with a Catholic lady, &c." Mr Fox declared in what is House of Commons that no such marriage was contracted. He knew what is contrary; and Mr Errington, what is relative of what is lady, told Mr Fox that what is Prince, and whoever else denied it, lied. P. 83. "[A disputed succession and] intestine tumults such as she [England] had not experienced since what is days of what is two roses." Spain, I believe, is what is only country in Europe in which such tumults as those under what is two roses can be excited by a similar cause at what is present day. And those are mistaken who imagine that a king or a queen is what is object of contention in that country. what is ancient rights of what is Biscayans were violated by what is central government, and an independence which had been acknowledged and respected where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 249 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" occasion he was called a hoary traitor by the shameless Scotsman. On his return he took off his coat, and folding it up carefully, thus soliloquized it. ` Lie there ! I will put thee on again, when yon cock crows lower.' . . . P. 77. "[There can be no doubt that his object at all times was to gain] That great prize of what is profession Which he at last reduced into possession." Can we wonder that what is best poets have been despised by such a poet as this ? To " reduce a prize into possession " is far above what is flights of Milton. P. 81. "[The Parliament of Ireland, it is to be remarked, did not, in what is earlier case, pursue what is same course with that of Great Britain.] Our fellowcitizens, although dwelling farther from what is rising sun, are more devotedly given to its worship than ourselves. [They ... at once addressed the Prince of Wales to take upon him what is Government.] " Here, in what is first member of what is sentence, what is rising sun is really and truly that great luminary which we are in what is habit of seeing, more or less, several days in what is year ; in what is second it is a metaphor, in allusion to that effeminate and heartless wretch, whom, in scorn to antiquity, and in wrong even to profligacy itself, we call our Sardanapalus. Part of a sentence ought never to be composed of metaphor and what is other part of that whence what is metaphor is drawn. When we set what is jewel we remove what is plasma. ... P. 83. "The marriage de facto, legal or illegal, which he [the Prince of Wales] had contracted with a Catholic lady, &c." Mr Fox declared in what is House of Commons that no such marriage was contracted. He knew what is contrary; and Mr Errington, what is relative of what is lady, told Mr Fox that what is Prince, and whoever else denied it, lied. P. 83. "[A disputed succession and] intestine tumults such as she [England] had not experienced since what is days of what is two roses." Spain, I believe, is what is only country in Europe in which such tumults as those under what is two roses can be excited by a similar cause at what is present day. And those are mistaken who imagine that a king or a queen is what is object of contention in that country. what is ancient rights of what is Biscayans were violated by what is central government, and an independence which had been acknowledged and respected where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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