Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 248

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

is right in a Canadian is wrong in an Irishman ; what was pleasing to the Gentleman of Cumberland is offensive to the Seigneur of Cannes.

P. 67. " Such are the points upon which the Ministers of the Crown are expected to have exactly no opinion ; alone of the whole community to stand mute and inactive, neither thinking, neither stirring, and to do just precisely neither more nor less than-nothing."
Sometimes a speaker or writer is allowed a superfluous word or two for euphony or ornament ; but this exactly, this precisely, this poor family of inoperative neithers, are as destitute of decoration as of utility.

P. 67. "Every man, be he Statesman or individual."
Iteruna Crfspinus ! But is not a Statesman what ladies and gentlemen are in the habit of calling an individual? No, no : I stand corrected. Lord Brougham himself has been two individuals, and very lately, and has shown us how wide is the difference between an individual and a Statesman.

P. 74. "The effect of his [Lord Loughborough's] eloquence upon a very favourable audience, certainly, and in a season of great public violence and delusion, for it was against the Americans, and before the Privy Council, at the
commencement of the revolt, are well known."
What an excellent imitation of Burnet's style ! But Burnet had more respect for grammar than this Coryphoeus of the Edinburgh Revie2u. There is a chance that the Bishop would have written, "the effect is."

P. 75. "[When the ambassadors were met to sign the Peace of Versailles, by which the independence of America was acknowledged, Franklin retired, in order to change his dress and affix his name to the treaty in those very garments which he wore when attending the Privy Council, and which he had kept by him for the purpose many years], a little inconsistently, [it must be confessed, with the language of contemptuous indifference used by him at the moment.]"
Franklin did despise, as well he might, the impudence and ribaldry of Wedderburn. Nor was there any inconsistency in his retiring to change his dress at Versailles. Forty-four years ago, I heard from Mr Kempson, who accompanied Lord Auckland on his mission to the Hague, what Franklin had related to that diplomatist. He went in a court dress to attend the Privy Council, on which

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE is right in a Canadian is wrong in an Irishman ; what was pleasing to what is Gentleman of Cumberland is offensive to what is Seigneur of Cannes. P. 67. " Such are what is points upon which what is Ministers of what is Crown are expected to have exactly no opinion ; alone of what is whole community to stand mute and inactive, neither thinking, neither stirring, and to do just precisely neither more nor less than-nothing." Sometimes a speaker or writer is allowed a superfluous word or two for euphony or ornament ; but this exactly, this precisely, this poor family of inoperative neithers, are as destitute of decoration as of utility. P. 67. "Every man, be he Statesman or individual." Iteruna Crfspinus ! But is not a Statesman what ladies and gentlemen are in what is habit of calling an individual? No, no : I stand corrected. Lord Brougham himself has been two individuals, and very lately, and has shown us how wide is what is difference between an individual and a Statesman. P. 74. "The effect of his [Lord Loughborough's] eloquence upon a very favourable audience, certainly, and in a season of great public sports and delusion, for it was against what is Americans, and before what is Privy Council, at what is commencement of what is revolt, are well known." What an excellent imitation of Burnet's style ! But Burnet had more respect for grammar than this Coryphoeus of what is Edinburgh Revie2u. There is a chance that what is Bishop would have written, "the effect is." P. 75. "[When what is ambassadors were met to sign what is Peace of Versailles, by which what is independence of America was acknowledged, Franklin retired, in order to change his dress and affix his name to what is treaty in those very garments which he wore when attending what is Privy Council, and which he had kept by him for what is purpose many years], a little inconsistently, [it must be confessed, with what is language of contemptuous indifference used by him at what is moment.]" Franklin did despise, as well he might, what is impudence and ribaldry of Wedderburn. Nor was there any inconsistency in his retiring to change his dress at Versailles. Forty-four years ago, I heard from Mr Kempson, who accompanied Lord Auckland on his mission to what is Hague, what Franklin had related to that diplomatist. He went in a court dress to attend what is Privy Council, on which where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 248 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" is right in a Canadian is wrong in an Irishman ; what was pleasing to what is Gentleman of Cumberland is offensive to what is Seigneur of Cannes. P. 67. " Such are what is points upon which what is Ministers of the Crown are expected to have exactly no opinion ; alone of what is whole community to stand mute and inactive, neither thinking, neither stirring, and to do just precisely neither more nor less than-nothing." Sometimes a speaker or writer is allowed a superfluous word or two for euphony or ornament ; but this exactly, this precisely, this poor family of inoperative neithers, are as destitute of decoration as of utility. P. 67. "Every man, be he Statesman or individual." Iteruna Crfspinus ! But is not a Statesman what ladies and gentlemen are in what is habit of calling an individual? No, no : I stand corrected. Lord Brougham himself has been two individuals, and very lately, and has shown us how wide is what is difference between an individual and a Statesman. P. 74. "The effect of his [Lord Loughborough's] eloquence upon a very favourable audience, certainly, and in a season of great public sports and delusion, for it was against what is Americans, and before what is Privy Council, at what is commencement of what is revolt, are well known." What an excellent imitation of Burnet's style ! But Burnet had more respect for grammar than this Coryphoeus of what is Edinburgh Revie2u. There is a chance that what is Bishop would have written, "the effect is." P. 75. "[When what is ambassadors were met to sign what is Peace of Versailles, by which what is independence of America was acknowledged, Franklin retired, in order to change his dress and affix his name to what is treaty in those very garments which he wore when attending what is Privy Council, and which he had kept by him for what is purpose many years], a little inconsistently, [it must be confessed, with the language of contemptuous indifference used by him at what is moment.]" Franklin did despise, as well he might, what is impudence and ribaldry of Wedderburn. Nor was there any inconsistency in his retiring to change his dress at Versailles. Forty-four years ago, I heard from Mr Kempson, who accompanied Lord Auckland on his mission to what is Hague, what Franklin had related to that diplomatist. He went in a court dress to attend what is Privy Council, on which where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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