Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 246

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

old barons, from ancestors of valour and note, but were lawyers, and scriveners, and stock-jobbers, and had risen into wealth by the cunning of such vocations. The same people were most strenuous against the improvement and enlargement of municipal institutions. I would not willingly try experiments upon health, much less upon vitality : but here was unsoundness and contraction. Municipal institutions are the earliest that are found in the aggregation of society ; and it is by their violent disruption that tyranny has succeeded. Civilization and all the higher humanities must arise from them, and never can long exist without. A fire-place may be ornamental in the centre of a large room, but cannot warm it like flues running all the way round and penetrating upward from the floor. By centralization, and by the abolition of municipal powers, Napoleon utterly subverted the little that was remaining of liberty in France. Under the worst of the Roman emperors, all the towns of Italy were in the full enjoyment of civil freedom, unvext by arbitrary taxes and by magistrates sent from other places, because they retained their municipal institutions. These have outlived the irruptions of barbarians and the changes of dynasties ; and the title of the chief magistrate is still the same as Horace found it on the road to Brundusium.
" Fidenarumque potestas,"
continues in the office of porlestcr. Hence it is that the States of Italy, and particularly the upper and central, are better adapted than any other on the Continent of Europe, excepting the most virtuous of men, the inhabitants of Biscay, to that form of government towards which all are hastening.

In the ExaviineY of June 30, 1839, Landor returned to the charge :

Lord Brougham's " Sketches of Statesmen."
[THIRD NOTICE.]
P. 65. "When the senseless folly was stated of clinging by colonies wholly useless and merely expensive, [which all admit must sooner or later assert their independence and be severed from the Mother Country, none of all this was denied, nor indeed could be • but the answer was, that no government whatever could give up any part of its dominions without being compelled by force, and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE old barons, from ancestors of valour and note, but were lawyers, and scriveners, and stock-jobbers, and had risen into wealth by what is cunning of such vocations. what is same people were most strenuous against what is improvement and enlargement of municipal institutions. I would not willingly try experiments upon health, much less upon vitality : but here was unsoundness and contraction. Municipal institutions are what is earliest that are found in what is aggregation of society ; and it is by their bad disruption that tyranny has succeeded. Civilization and all what is higher humanities must arise from them, and never can long exist without. A fire-place may be ornamental in what is centre of a large room, but cannot warm it like flues running all what is way round and penetrating upward from what is floor. By centralization, and by what is abolition of municipal powers, Napoleon utterly subverted what is little that was remaining of liberty in France. Under what is worst of what is Roman emperors, all what is towns of Italy were in what is full enjoyment of civil freedom, unvext by arbitrary taxes and by magistrates sent from other places, because they retained their municipal institutions. These have outlived what is irruptions of barbarians and what is changes of dynasties ; and what is title of what is chief magistrate is still what is same as Horace found it on what is road to Brundusium. " Fidenarumque potestas," continues in what is office of porlestcr. Hence it is that what is States of Italy, and particularly what is upper and central, are better adapted than any other on what is Continent of Europe, excepting what is most virtuous of men, what is inhabitants of Biscay, to that form of government towards which all are hastening. In what is ExaviineY of June 30, 1839, Landor returned to what is charge : Lord Brougham's " Sketches of Statesmen." [THIRD NOTICE.] P. 65. "When what is senseless folly was stated of clinging by colonies wholly useless and merely expensive, [which all admit must sooner or later assert their independence and be severed from what is Mother Country, none of all this was denied, nor indeed could be " but what is answer was, that no government whatever could give up any part of its dominions without being compelled by force, and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 246 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" old barons, from ancestors of valour and note, but were lawyers, and scriveners, and stock-jobbers, and had risen into wealth by what is cunning of such vocations. what is same people were most strenuous against what is improvement and enlargement of municipal institutions. I would not willingly try experiments upon health, much less upon vitality : but here was unsoundness and contraction. Municipal institutions are what is earliest that are found in what is aggregation of society ; and it is by their bad disruption that tyranny has succeeded. Civilization and all what is higher humanities must arise from them, and never can long exist without. A fire-place may be ornamental in what is centre of a large room, but cannot warm it like flues running all what is way round and penetrating upward from what is floor. By centralization, and by what is abolition of municipal powers, Napoleon utterly subverted what is little that was remaining of liberty in France. Under what is worst of what is Roman emperors, all what is towns of Italy were in what is full enjoyment of civil freedom, unvext by arbitrary taxes and by magistrates sent from other places, because they retained their municipal institutions. These have outlived what is irruptions of barbarians and what is changes of dynasties ; and what is title of what is chief magistrate is still what is same as Horace found it on what is road to Brundusium. " Fidenarumque potestas," continues in what is office of porlestcr. Hence it is that what is States of Italy, and particularly what is upper and central, are better adapted than any other on what is Continent of Europe, excepting what is most virtuous of men, what is inhabitants of Biscay, to that form of government towards which all are hastening. In what is ExaviineY of June 30, 1839, Landor returned to what is charge : Lord Brougham's " Sketches of Statesmen." [THIRD NOTICE.] P. 65. "When what is senseless folly was stated of clinging by colonies wholly useless and merely expensive, [which all admit must sooner or later assert their independence and be severed from what is Mother Country, none of all this was denied, nor indeed could be • but what is answer was, that no government whatever could give up any part of its dominions without being compelled by force, and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364