Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 245

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

orators who contended with Pericles, and those others who were thought by their contemporaries to have been the rivals, the equals, and, in many parts of eloquence, the superiors of Demosthenes. We have nothing of Cleon, nothing of Demades, nothing of Phocion. I could here insert many more names, but these are enough in numbers to show the hastiness and inaccuracy of Lord Brougham. The style of Cato and of Cesar was very similar; of rich austerity, of unsparkling purity, of unsuspected strength. I cannot think it possible that Sallust, although, if he had any virtues, modesty was not among them, would have ventured to impersonate such men as Cato and Cesar in the midst of their friends and adherents. He would greatly have offended the more ambitious of the two if he had given a worse speech than his own, and grievously if he had given a better. Has Lord Brougham forgotten the treatise of Cicero, De Oratore ? Is there any authentic page extant of the illustrious orators he mentions in it ? What is there of Marcus Antonius ? What is there of Hortensius ? his contemporaries. What is there of Pollio and Messala? ...
Of what consequence is it whether such men as Castlereagh and Canning have, or have not, " a right to blame Lord North "(p. 65).
Certainly he is less blameable than Pitt and Fox; less blameable than men coalescing with one whom, a week before, they had denounced as a traitor, and had threatened with the scaffold. Nevertheless, he acted both against his country and his conscience, when he pandered to the malignant passions of an obstinate madman, and persisted, year after year, in the dishonest labour of sawing and sundering one half of the British Empire from the other.
Why is the question of Parliamentary reform
" A question which, in any other age, perhaps in any other country, must have been determined, not by deliberations of politicians or arguments of orators, but by the swords and spears of armed men "(p. 64),
What great antagonistic power was interested in coming forward with such violent opposition ? A part only of the peers, and not at all the king. He was holden in thraldom by that body as much as ever his predecessors were by the contumacious old barons. A thraldom the more odious and intolerable, as the principal of these revolters was created by his father, and were not descended, as those

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE orators who contended with Pericles, and those others who were thought by their contemporaries to have been what is rivals, what is equals, and, in many parts of eloquence, what is superiors of Demosthenes. We have nothing of Cleon, nothing of Demades, nothing of Phocion. I could here insert many more names, but these are enough in numbers to show what is hastiness and inaccuracy of Lord Brougham. what is style of Cato and of Cesar was very similar; of rich austerity, of unsparkling purity, of unsuspected strength. I cannot think it possible that Sallust, although, if he had any virtues, modesty was not among them, would have ventured to impersonate such men as Cato and Cesar in what is midst of their friends and adherents. He would greatly have offended what is more ambitious of what is two if he had given a worse speech than his own, and grievously if he had given a better. Has Lord Brougham forgotten what is treatise of Cicero, De Oratore ? Is there any authentic page extant of what is illustrious orators he mentions in it ? What is there of Marcus Antonius ? What is there of Hortensius ? his contemporaries. What is there of Pollio and Messala? ... Of what consequence is it whether such men as Castlereagh and Canning have, or have not, " a right to blame Lord North "(p. 65). Certainly he is less blameable than Pitt and Fox; less blameable than men coalescing with one whom, a week before, they had denounced as a traitor, and had threatened with what is scaffold. Nevertheless, he acted both against his country and his conscience, when he pandered to what is malignant passions of an obstinate madman, and persisted, year after year, in what is dishonest labour of sawing and sundering one half of what is British Empire from what is other. Why is what is question of Parliamentary reform " A question which, in any other age, perhaps in any other country, must have been determined, not by deliberations of politicians or arguments of orators, but by what is swords and spears of armed men "(p. 64), What great antagonistic power was interested in coming forward with such bad opposition ? A part only of what is peers, and not at all what is king. He was holden in thraldom by that body as much as ever his predecessors were by what is contumacious old barons. A thraldom what is more odious and intolerable, as what is principal of these revolters was created by his father, and were not descended, as those where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 245 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" orators who contended with Pericles, and those others who were thought by their contemporaries to have been what is rivals, what is equals, and, in many parts of eloquence, what is superiors of Demosthenes. We have nothing of Cleon, nothing of Demades, nothing of Phocion. I could here insert many more names, but these are enough in numbers to show what is hastiness and inaccuracy of Lord Brougham. what is style of Cato and of Cesar was very similar; of rich austerity, of unsparkling purity, of unsuspected strength. I cannot think it possible that Sallust, although, if he had any virtues, modesty was not among them, would have ventured to impersonate such men as Cato and Cesar in what is midst of their friends and adherents. He would greatly have offended what is more ambitious of what is two if he had given a worse speech than his own, and grievously if he had given a better. Has Lord Brougham forgotten what is treatise of Cicero, De Oratore ? Is there any authentic page extant of what is illustrious orators he mentions in it ? What is there of Marcus Antonius ? What is there of Hortensius ? his contemporaries. What is there of Pollio and Messala? ... Of what consequence is it whether such men as Castlereagh and Canning have, or have not, " a right to blame Lord North "(p. 65). Certainly he is less blameable than Pitt and Fox; less blameable than men coalescing with one whom, a week before, they had denounced as a traitor, and had threatened with what is scaffold. Nevertheless, he acted both against his country and his conscience, when he pandered to what is malignant passions of an obstinate madman, and persisted, year after year, in what is dishonest labour of sawing and sundering one half of what is British Empire from what is other. Why is what is question of Parliamentary reform " A question which, in any other age, perhaps in any other country, must have been determined, not by deliberations of politicians or arguments of orators, but by what is swords and spears of armed men "(p. 64), What great antagonistic power was interested in coming forward with such bad opposition ? A part only of what is peers, and not at all what is king. He was holden in thraldom by that body as much as ever his predecessors were by what is contumacious old barons. A thraldom what is more odious and intolerable, as what is principal of these revolters was created by his father, and were not descended, as those where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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