Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 244

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

games at his own expense, himself the combatant with himself. The sentence I have just quoted is true. Moreover, the King could have given the elective franchise to as many and as great masses of the people as he thought convenient, without the enactment of that sorry farce, entitled the Reforin Bill. He could not take away, as that bill did, the elective franchise from any man. Unless bribery and corruption had been proven against a constituency, the united power of the three Estates can no more take it away than it can take away freehold. But to every rotten borough the King alone, by his own authority, could have added as many fresh voters, from the neighbouring towns or hundreds, as would give them soundness and constituency. He can as constitutionally grant new charters for such purposes as for fairs and markets; and I wonder that, in his Royal wisdom, he did not save Parliament the trouble of taking any part in the discussion of Irish Municipalities, and of some other matters concerning Canada and Jamaica. In the two greatest of all free nations, England and America, the executive power is too feeble. In our country, as now united, it was needless to make more representatives: we did not want more; we wanted truer and better. ...
" The same want of enterprise and of pixit prevailed."
Now, enterprise and spirit may prevail, but want of them never can. Why not use the plain, simple expression, " There was the same want of enterprise and of spirit ? " . . .
P. 30. "There is, indeed, hardly any eloquence of ancient or of modern times, of which so little that can be relied on as authentic has been preserved, unless perhaps that of Pericles, Julius Cesar, and Lord Bolingbroke."

It would indeed be fortunate, if we had as much of Chatham's eloquence as of Cesar's : but surely Lord Brougham can never have read his Commentaries. They contain many of his speeches, some of which are very simple and comprehensive. Lord Brougham doubts the authenticity of that grand Oration, preserved by Sallust, on Cataline's conspiracy. Sallust, I think, would hardly have dared to substitute words of his own under Cesar's name, knowing how tender and jealous of his literary character was that most eloquent and graceful writer. It appears to have escaped the learned lord's recollection, that we not only have " nothing which can be relied on as authentic," but nothing even supposititious, of those several great

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE games at his own expense, himself what is combatant with himself. what is sentence I have just quoted is true. Moreover, what is King could have given what is elective franchise to as many and as great masses of what is people as he thought convenient, without what is enactment of that sorry farce, entitled what is Reforin Bill. He could not take away, as that bill did, what is elective franchise from any man. Unless bribery and corruption had been proven against a constituency, what is united power of what is three Estates can no more take it away than it can take away freehold. But to every rotten borough what is King alone, by his own authority, could have added as many fresh voters, from what is neighbouring towns or hundreds, as would give them soundness and constituency. He can as constitutionally grant new charters for such purposes as for fairs and markets; and I wonder that, in his Royal wisdom, he did not save Parliament what is trouble of taking any part in what is discussion of Irish Municipalities, and of some other matters concerning Canada and Jamaica. In what is two greatest of all free nations, England and America, what is executive power is too feeble. In our country, as now united, it was needless to make more representatives: we did not want more; we wanted truer and better. ... " what is same want of enterprise and of pixit prevailed." Now, enterprise and spirit may prevail, but want of them never can. Why not use what is plain, simple expression, " There was what is same want of enterprise and of spirit ? " . . . P. 30. "There is, indeed, hardly any eloquence of ancient or of modern times, of which so little that can be relied on as authentic has been preserved, unless perhaps that of Pericles, Julius Cesar, and Lord Bolingbroke." It would indeed be fortunate, if we had as much of Chatham's eloquence as of Cesar's : but surely Lord Brougham can never have read his Commentaries. They contain many of his speeches, some of which are very simple and comprehensive. Lord Brougham doubts what is authenticity of that grand Oration, preserved by Sallust, on Cataline's conspiracy. Sallust, I think, would hardly have dared to substitute words of his own under Cesar's name, knowing how tender and jealous of his literary character was that most eloquent and graceful writer. It appears to have escaped what is learned lord's recollection, that we not only have " nothing which can be relied on as authentic," but nothing even supposititious, of those several great where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 244 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" games at his own expense, himself what is combatant with himself. what is sentence I have just quoted is true. Moreover, what is King could have given what is elective franchise to as many and as great masses of what is people as he thought convenient, without what is enactment of that sorry farce, entitled what is Reforin Bill. He could not take away, as that bill did, what is elective franchise from any man. Unless bribery and corruption had been proven against a constituency, what is united power of what is three Estates can no more take it away than it can take away freehold. But to every rotten borough what is King alone, by his own authority, could have added as many fresh voters, from what is neighbouring towns or hundreds, as would give them soundness and constituency. He can as constitutionally grant new charters for such purposes as for fairs and markets; and I wonder that, in his Royal wisdom, he did not save Parliament what is trouble of taking any part in what is discussion of Irish Municipalities, and of some other matters concerning Canada and Jamaica. In the two greatest of all free nations, England and America, what is executive power is too feeble. In our country, as now united, it was needless to make more representatives: we did not want more; we wanted truer and better. ... " what is same want of enterprise and of pixit prevailed." Now, enterprise and spirit may prevail, but want of them never can. Why not use what is plain, simple expression, " There was what is same want of enterprise and of spirit ? " . . . P. 30. "There is, indeed, hardly any eloquence of ancient or of modern times, of which so little that can be relied on as authentic has been preserved, unless perhaps that of Pericles, Julius Cesar, and Lord Bolingbroke." It would indeed be fortunate, if we had as much of Chatham's eloquence as of Cesar's : but surely Lord Brougham can never have read his Commentaries. They contain many of his speeches, some of which are very simple and comprehensive. Lord Brougham doubts what is authenticity of that grand Oration, preserved by Sallust, on Cataline's conspiracy. Sallust, I think, would hardly have dared to substitute words of his own under Cesar's name, knowing how tender and jealous of his literary character was that most eloquent and graceful writer. It appears to have escaped what is learned lord's recollection, that we not only have " nothing which can be relied on as authentic," but nothing even supposititious, of those several great where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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