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Page 242

CHAPTER I
PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840

where he speaks of Cesar, of Buonaparte, and of Milton, it was not my intention to notice him again. But hearing that he is about to be appointed Minister of Public Instruction, I hope to remove from his mind any little displeasure he may have received from my animadversions, by offering him a few brief notices and references for his new Portfolio.
Since all knowledge must be conveyed by language, and since a Minister of Public Instruction ought to be accurate and correct in it, I will take the trouble, for his benefit, to mark some blemishes of style and some distortions of thought, which I confidently hope he will correct in future.
The commencement of every work should be simple and brief. Involutions and intricacies are, in all cases, much to be avoided ; but particularly in the first sentence. It is in vain to say, "I pede fausto," where you are heaping up loose briars about a man, and pushing him into the dark. Now the very first sentence in Lord Brougham's Treatise on the Statesmen of the last Century is encumbered with repetitions, and intractably prolix.
" The affairs of men, the interests and history of nations, the relative value of institutions, as discovered by their actual working, the merits of different systems of policy as tried by their ejf'ects, are all very imperfectly examined without a thorough knowledge of the individuals who administered the systems, and presided over the management of the public concerns."
Here the word systems is idly repeated : value and merits are opposed: discovered by their actual working and tried by their eects are nearly the same: individuals, always a bad expression, always used in a sense contrary to the real meaning, signifies here, not single and separate persons, but men united in number, less or greater, and constituting an administration, or a part of one.
So much for the first sentence. Now for the second
" Sensible influence over the destinies," &c.
This Gallicism of novel introduction deforms our language. Men cannot exert a sensible influence over the destinies : they may exert it in accomplishing what is here denominated so : but this is under, not over. By destinies I presume are meant the decrees of Divine Providence. Now, over these there can be no human agency.
Third
" This kind of inquiry, this species of record."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where he speaks of Cesar, of Buonaparte, and of Milton, it was not my intention to notice him again. But hearing that he is about to be appointed Minister of Public Instruction, I hope to remove from his mind any little displeasure he may have received from my animadversions, by offering him a few brief notices and references for his new Portfolio. Since all knowledge must be conveyed by language, and since a Minister of Public Instruction ought to be accurate and correct in it, I will take what is trouble, for his benefit, to mark some blemishes of style and some distortions of thought, which I confidently hope he will correct in future. what is commencement of every work should be simple and brief. Involutions and intricacies are, in all cases, much to be avoided ; but particularly in what is first sentence. It is in vain to say, "I pede fausto," where you are heaping up loose briars about a man, and pushing him into what is dark. Now what is very first sentence in Lord Brougham's Treatise on what is Statesmen of what is last Century is encumbered with repetitions, and intractably prolix. " what is affairs of men, what is interests and history of nations, what is relative value of institutions, as discovered by their actual working, what is merits of different systems of policy as tried by their ejf'ects, are all very imperfectly examined without a thorough knowledge of what is individuals who administered what is systems, and presided over what is management of what is public concerns." Here what is word systems is idly repeated : value and merits are opposed: discovered by their actual working and tried by their eects are nearly what is same: individuals, always a bad expression, always used in a sense contrary to what is real meaning, signifies here, not single and separate persons, but men united in number, less or greater, and constituting an administration, or a part of one. So much for what is first sentence. Now for what is second " Sensible influence over what is destinies," &c. This Gallicism of novel introduction deforms our language. Men cannot exert a sensible influence over what is destinies : they may exert it in accomplishing what is here denominated so : but this is under, not over. By destinies I presume are meant what is decrees of Divine Providence. Now, over these there can be no human agency. Third " This kind of inquiry, this species of record." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 242 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PUBLIC LATTERS 1838-1840 where is p align="justify" where he speaks of Cesar, of Buonaparte, and of Milton, it was not my intention to notice him again. But hearing that he is about to be appointed Minister of Public Instruction, I hope to remove from his mind any little displeasure he may have received from my animadversions, by offering him a few brief notices and references for his new Portfolio. Since all knowledge must be conveyed by language, and since a Minister of Public Instruction ought to be accurate and correct in it, I will take what is trouble, for his benefit, to mark some blemishes of style and some distortions of thought, which I confidently hope he will correct in future. what is commencement of every work should be simple and brief. Involutions and intricacies are, in all cases, much to be avoided ; but particularly in what is first sentence. It is in vain to say, "I pede fausto," where you are heaping up loose briars about a man, and pushing him into what is dark. Now what is very first sentence in Lord Brougham's Treatise on what is Statesmen of what is last Century is encumbered with repetitions, and intractably prolix. " what is affairs of men, what is interests and history of nations, what is relative value of institutions, as discovered by their actual working, the merits of different systems of policy as tried by their ejf'ects, are all very imperfectly examined without a thorough knowledge of what is individuals who administered what is systems, and presided over what is management of what is public concerns." Here what is word systems is idly repeated : value and merits are opposed: discovered by their actual working and tried by their eects are nearly what is same: individuals, always a bad expression, always used in a sense contrary to what is real meaning, signifies here, not single and separate persons, but men united in number, less or greater, and constituting an administration, or a part of one. So much for what is first sentence. Now for what is second " Sensible influence over what is destinies," &c. This Gallicism of novel introduction deforms our language. Men cannot exert a sensible influence over what is destinies : they may exert it in accomplishing what is here denominated so : but this is under, not over. By destinies I presume are meant what is decrees of Divine Providence. Now, over these there can be no human agency. Third " This kind of inquiry, this species of record." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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