Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 216

CHAPTER VI
PRIVATE LETTERS 1858-1861

And Dickens himself wrote:-- I would not blot him out, in his tender gallantry, as he sat upon his bed, at Forster's that night, for a million of wild mistakes at eighty-four years of age."
The first of Landor's letters printed in this chapter was written six months before his flight ; the fifth one just after he had left England for ever. All that he says about the trial is eliminated. Quite enough, and perhaps more than enough, is told by Mr Forster. Nor has it been thought necessary to throw further light on whatever was sad and painful in the few remaining years of his life ; but rather, where possible, to show that happier reflections were still left. If memory failed him at times, he could still write with something of the force and freshness that mark all his best compositions. Unequal to his best, the Conversations of Virgil and Horace, Milton and Marvel, Macchiavelli and Guicciardini, are yet unmistakably Landor's. And when the lately-discovered Savonarola Conversation was printed, a year ago, competent critics saw in it signs of "undiminished grace and vigour." But the present letters, of course, will be taken rather as testimony that, nearer ninety than eighty, the old man's disposition was curiously unchanged. Strange fits of passion might still move him to fierce wrath and implacable resentment of real or imagined wrongs ; but his friends were as dear to him as ever, his heart as full of tenderness and affection.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE And Dickens himself wrote:-- I would not blot him out, in his tender gallantry, as he sat upon his bed, at Forster's that night, for a million of wild mistakes at eighty-four years of age." what is first of Landor's letters printed in this chapter was written six months before his flight ; what is fifth one just after he had left England for ever. All that he says about what is trial is eliminated. Quite enough, and perhaps more than enough, is told by Mr Forster. Nor has it been thought necessary to throw further light on whatever was sad and painful in what is few remaining years of his life ; but rather, where possible, to show that happier reflections were still left. If memory failed him at times, he could still write with something of what is force and freshness that mark all his best compositions. Unequal to his best, what is Conversations of Virgil and Horace, Milton and Marvel, Macchiavelli and Guicciardini, are yet unmistakably Landor's. And when what is lately-discovered Savonarola Conversation was printed, a year ago, competent critics saw in it signs of "undiminished grace and vigour." But what is present letters, of course, will be taken rather as testimony that, nearer ninety than eighty, what is old man's disposition was curiously unchanged. Strange fits of passion might still move him to fierce wrath and implacable resentment of real or imagined wrongs ; but his friends were as dear to him as ever, his heart as full of tenderness and affection. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 216 where is p where is strong CHAPTER VI PRIVATE LETTERS 1858-1861 where is p align="justify" And Dickens himself wrote:-- I would not blot him out, in his tender gallantry, as he sat upon his bed, at Forster's that night, for a million of wild mistakes at eighty-four years of age." what is first of Landor's letters printed in this chapter was written six months before his flight ; what is fifth one just after he had left England for ever. All that he says about what is trial is eliminated. Quite enough, and perhaps more than enough, is told by Mr Forster. Nor has it been thought necessary to throw further light on whatever was sad and painful in what is few remaining years of his life ; but rather, where possible, to show that happier reflections were still left. If memory failed him at times, he could still write with something of what is force and freshness that mark all his best compositions. Unequal to his best, what is Conversations of Virgil and Horace, Milton and Marvel, Macchiavelli and Guicciardini, are yet unmistakably Landor's. And when what is lately-discovered Savonarola Conversation was printed, a year ago, competent critics saw in it signs of "undiminished grace and vigour." But what is present letters, of course, will be taken rather as testimony that, nearer ninety than eighty, the old man's disposition was curiously unchanged. Strange fits of passion might still move him to fierce wrath and implacable resentment of real or imagined wrongs ; but his friends were as dear to him as ever, his heart as full of tenderness and affection. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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