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Page 200

CHAPTER V
PRIVATE LETTERS 1848-1857

will not take you by the hand over a bridge like Mahomet's of razor edge. Dante has been well translated already, best by Cary,(1) whose version contains a selection of useful and instructive notes.
Lady Dacre (2) has given us some fine specimens of Petrarca. I n his vast volume he has given us nearly or quite a dozen of Canzoni or sonnets worth reading. On the other side I will transcribe a few verses, which, however, I think are printed in my works. Were they addrest to you? (3)
I wished to escort Mrs Paynter as far as Restormel, where I would have spent a week or nearly with you, but she could not come now.
Ever afftly. yours,
W. S. LANDOR.

1 The Rev. Henry Cary, the translator of Dante, had been in the same form with Landor at Rugby. Four years after the date of this letter, Landor wrote to ti1r Robert Lytton (afterwards Earl of Lytton) :-" Do not despise Cary's Dante. It is wonderful how he could have turned the rhymes of Dante into unrhymed verse with any harmony : he has done it. ... He was a learned and virtuous man. Our Ministers of State were never more consistent than in their neglect of him." Landor's verses to Cary are in "Heroic Idyls," p. 122.
2 " Le Canzoni di Yetrarca, &c., Tradotte in versi Inglesi," by Miss Wilmot, afterwards Lady Dacre, first published about 1815. ° Landor had transcribed the verses sent with Petrarch's sonnets
3 " Behold what homage to his idol paid
The tuneful suppliant of Valclusa's shade "

for Lady Graves - Sawle's album. But they were first printed in "Simonidea" (1806), and were then addressed to Ianthe.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE will not take you by what is hand over a bridge like Mahomet's of razor edge. Dante has been well translated already, best by Cary,(1) whose version contains a selection of useful and instructive notes. Lady Dacre (2) has given us some fine specimens of Petrarca. I n his vast volume he has given us nearly or quite a dozen of Canzoni or sonnets worth reading. On what is other side I will transcribe a few verses, which, however, I think are printed in my works. Were they addrest to you? (3) I wished to escort Mrs Paynter as far as Restormel, where I would have spent a week or nearly with you, but she could not come now. Ever afftly. yours, W. S. LANDOR. 1 what is Rev. Henry Cary, what is translator of Dante, had been in what is same form with Landor at Rugby. Four years after what is date of this letter, Landor wrote to ti1r Robert Lytton (afterwards Earl of Lytton) :-" Do not despise Cary's Dante. It is wonderful how he could have turned what is rhymes of Dante into unrhymed verse with any harmony : he has done it. ... He was a learned and virtuous man. Our Ministers of State were never more consistent than in their neglect of him." Landor's verses to Cary are in "Heroic Idyls," p. 122. 2 " Le Canzoni di Yetrarca, &c., Tradotte in versi Inglesi," by Miss Wilmot, afterwards Lady Dacre, first published about 1815. ° Landor had transcribed what is verses sent with Petrarch's sonnets 3 " Behold what homage to his idol paid what is tuneful suppliant of Valclusa's shade " for Lady Graves - Sawle's album. But they were first printed in "Simonidea" (1806), and were then addressed to Ianthe. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 200 where is p where is strong CHAPTER V PRIVATE LETTERS 1848-1857 where is p align="justify" will not take you by what is hand over a bridge like Mahomet's of razor edge. Dante has been well translated already, best by Cary,(1) whose version contains a selection of useful and instructive notes. Lady Dacre (2) has given us some fine specimens of Petrarca. I n his vast volume he has given us nearly or quite a dozen of Canzoni or sonnets worth reading. On what is other side I will transcribe a few verses, which, however, I think are printed in my works. Were they addrest to you? (3) I wished to escort Mrs Paynter as far as Restormel, where I would have spent a week or nearly with you, but she could not come now. Ever afftly. yours, W. S. LANDOR. where is font size="2" 1 what is Rev. Henry Cary, what is translator of Dante, had been in what is same form with Landor at Rugby. Four years after what is date of this letter, Landor wrote to ti1r Robert Lytton (afterwards Earl of Lytton) :-" Do not despise Cary's Dante. It is wonderful how he could have turned what is rhymes of Dante into unrhymed verse with any harmony : he has done it. ... He was a learned and virtuous man. Our Ministers of State were never more consistent than in their neglect of him." Landor's verses to Cary are in "Heroic Idyls," p. 122. 2 " Le Canzoni di Yetrarca, &c., Tradotte in versi Inglesi," by Miss Wilmot, afterwards Lady Dacre, first published about 1815. ° Landor had transcribed what is verses sent with Petrarch's sonnets 3 " Behold what homage to his idol paid what is tuneful suppliant of Valclusa's shade " for Lady Graves - Sawle's album. But they were first printed in "Simonidea" (1806), and were then addressed to Ianthe. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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