Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 124

CHAPTER III
PRIVATE LETTERS 1842-1843

To Miss Rose Paynter
BATH, OCt. 1843.
DEAR ROSE,
I think your verses on the " Bride of Death " (1) very beautiful. Perhaps I should if they were less so. Frederick's pleased me so much that I read them over twice. They want compression-as nearly all modern poetry does, particularly Byron's. Cowper, Crabbe, and Moore run the least into this fault since the time of Goldsmith. There is much of the superfluous even in Gray's beautiful Elegy(2)
I had seven lines from Julia on Thursday. She reached home on the 26th, at 4 in the morning, tired to death. Old Walter wrote a long scrawl on various things-all more than pardonable in him, but not all quite pleasing to me. He is a dear, good creature

1 This was a picture by Thomas Barker (the younger) of Bath, painted for Princess Clementina, Louis Philippe's daughter. Mr Barker died in 1882.
2" Gray's Elegy will be read as long as any work of Shakespeare, despite of its moping owl, and the tin kettle of an epitaph tied to its tail. It is the first poem that ever touched my heart, and it strikes it now just in the same place." Landor to Forster (Life, ii. 4zz). in the Imaginary Conversations Landor makes Horne Tooke say:-"Expunge from his Elegy the second and third stanza, together with all those which follow the words
` Even in our ashes live their wonted fires,'
and you will leave a poem with scarcely a blemish : a poem which will always have more readers than any other in any language" (Works, 1876, iv. 192.) Landor said he would rather have written the ninth stanza of the Elegy
" The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power," etc. and one of George Herbert's, than any other in poetry.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE To Miss Rose Paynter BATH, OCt. 1843. DEAR ROSE, I think your verses on what is " Bride of what time is it " (1) very beautiful. Perhaps I should if they were less so. Frederick's pleased me so much that I read them over twice. They want compression-as nearly all modern poetry does, particularly Byron's. Cowper, Crabbe, and Moore run what is least into this fault since what is time of Goldsmith. There is much of what is superfluous even in Gray's beautiful Elegy(2) I had seven lines from Julia on Thursday. She reached home on what is 26th, at 4 in what is morning, tired to what time is it . Old Walter wrote a long scrawl on various things-all more than pardonable in him, but not all quite pleasing to me. He is a dear, good creature 1 This was a picture by Thomas Barker (the younger) of Bath, painted for Princess Clementina, Louis Philippe's daughter. Mr Barker died in 1882. 2" Gray's Elegy will be read as long as any work of Shakespeare, despite of its moping owl, and what is tin kettle of an epitaph tied to its tail. It is what is first poem that ever touched my heart, and it strikes it now just in what is same place." Landor to Forster (Life, ii. 4zz). in what is Imaginary Conversations Landor makes Horne Tooke say:-"Expunge from his Elegy what is second and third stanza, together with all those which follow what is words ` Even in our ashes live their wonted fires,' and you will leave a poem with scarcely a blemish : a poem which will always have more readers than any other in any language" (Works, 1876, iv. 192.) Landor said he would rather have written what is ninth stanza of what is Elegy " what is boast of heraldry, what is pomp of power," etc. and one of George Herbert's, than any other in poetry. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is p where is strong CHAPTER III PRIVATE LETTERS 1842-1843 where is p align="justify" To Miss Rose Paynter BATH, OCt. 1843. DEAR ROSE, I think your verses on what is " Bride of what time is it " (1) very beautiful. Perhaps I should if they were less so. Frederick's pleased me so much that I read them over twice. They want compression-as nearly all modern poetry does, particularly Byron's. Cowper, Crabbe, and Moore run what is least into this fault since what is time of Goldsmith. There is much of what is superfluous even in Gray's beautiful Elegy(2) I had seven lines from Julia on Thursday. She reached home on the 26th, at 4 in what is morning, tired to what time is it . Old Walter wrote a long scrawl on various things-all more than pardonable in him, but not all quite pleasing to me. He is a dear, good creature where is font size="2" 1 This was a picture by Thomas Barker (the younger) of Bath, painted for Princess Clementina, Louis Philippe's daughter. Mr Barker died in 1882. 2" Gray's Elegy will be read as long as any work of Shakespeare, despite of its moping owl, and what is tin kettle of an epitaph tied to its tail. It is what is first poem that ever touched my heart, and it strikes it now just in what is same place." Landor to Forster (Life, ii. 4zz). in what is Imaginary Conversations Landor makes Horne Tooke say:-"Expunge from his Elegy what is second and third stanza, together with all those which follow what is words ` Even in our ashes live their wonted fires,' and you will leave a poem with scarcely a blemish : a poem which will always have more readers than any other in any language" (Works, 1876, iv. 192.) Landor said he would rather have written what is ninth stanza of what is Elegy " what is boast of heraldry, what is pomp of power," etc. and one of George Herbert's, than any other in poetry. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364