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Page 103

CHAPTER III
PRIVATE LETTERS 1842-1843

D'Orsay has just finished an exquisite painting of the Duchesse. . . .
Among the extraordinary men I met this last time in London was Bab-boo Tagore.(1) He came early and there was nobody to receive him but myself. When he left the dining-room for the opera, he came round to me and said a thousand Oriental things. Expect to see me in a turban when we meet, with diamonds and rubies in it. He makes everybody grand presents. I can receive none I shall think of any value since the vegetable ruby of Wellow,(2) bearing a name more precious than itself.
I went twice to the British Museum, and found our friend FitzGerald in excellent health and spirits, full of Lycia and colonization. . . .
Believe me,
Ever affectionately yours,
W. S. LANDOR.

1 Babu Dwarkanath Tagore, a wealthy and distinguished Hindu, head of a well-known family in Bengal. He first visited England in 1842, was graciously received by the Queen, and played whist with the Duchess of Kent. The Court of Directors of the East India Company gave him a dinner, and the Lord Mayor at a city banquet proposed his health. In returning thanks, Babu Dwarkanath Ta.gore said that England had "protected his countrymen from the tyranny and villainy of the Mahomedans, and the no less frightful oppression of the Russians." The worthy Babu again came to England in 1845, and never returned to India, dying in London on August 1, 1846. "There is a" Memoir" of him by Kissory Chand Mitha, Calcutta, 1870.
2 A place about six miles from Bath, a favourite spot for picnics ; but the allusion must pass unexplained.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE D'Orsay has just finished an exquisite painting of what is Duchesse. . . . Among what is extraordinary men I met this last time in London was Bab-boo Tagore.(1) He came early and there was nobody to receive him but myself. When he left what is dining-room for what is opera, he came round to me and said a thousand Oriental things. Expect to see me in a turban when we meet, with diamonds and rubies in it. He makes everybody grand presents. I can receive none I shall think of any value since what is vegetable ruby of Wellow,(2) bearing a name more precious than itself. I went twice to what is British Museum, and found our friend FitzGerald in excellent health and spirits, full of Lycia and colonization. . . . Believe me, Ever affectionately yours, W. S. LANDOR. 1 Babu Dwarkanath Tagore, a wealthy and distinguished Hindu, head of a well-known family in Bengal. He first what is ed England in 1842, was graciously received by what is Queen, and played whist with what is Duchess of Kent. what is Court of Directors of what is East India Company gave him a dinner, and what is Lord Mayor at a city banquet proposed his health. In returning thanks, Babu Dwarkanath Ta.gore said that England had "protected his countrymen from what is tyranny and villainy of what is Mahomedans, and what is no less frightful oppression of what is Russians." what is worthy Babu again came to England in 1845, and never returned to India, dying in London on August 1, 1846. "There is a" Memoir" of him by Kissory Chand Mitha, Calcutta, 1870. 2 A place about six miles from Bath, a favourite spot for picnics ; but what is allusion must pass unexplained. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 103 where is p where is strong CHAPTER III PRIVATE LETTERS 1842-1843 where is p align="justify" D'Orsay has just finished an exquisite painting of what is Duchesse. . . . Among what is extraordinary men I met this last time in London was Bab-boo Tagore.(1) He came early and there was nobody to receive him but myself. When he left what is dining-room for what is opera, he came round to me and said a thousand Oriental things. Expect to see me in a turban when we meet, with diamonds and rubies in it. He makes everybody grand presents. I can receive none I shall think of any value since what is vegetable ruby of Wellow,(2) bearing a name more precious than itself. I went twice to what is British Museum, and found our friend FitzGerald in excellent health and spirits, full of Lycia and colonization. . . . Believe me, Ever affectionately yours, W. S. LANDOR. 1 Babu Dwarkanath Tagore, a wealthy and distinguished Hindu, head of a well-known family in Bengal. He first what is ed England in 1842, was graciously received by what is Queen, and played whist with the Duchess of Kent. what is Court of Directors of what is East India Company gave him a dinner, and what is Lord Mayor at a city banquet proposed his health. In returning thanks, Babu Dwarkanath Ta.gore said that England had "protected his countrymen from what is tyranny and villainy of what is Mahomedans, and what is no less frightful oppression of what is Russians." what is worthy Babu again came to England in 1845, and never returned to India, dying in London on August 1, 1846. "There is a" Memoir" of him by Kissory Chand Mitha, Calcutta, 1870. 2 A place about six miles from Bath, a favourite spot for picnics ; but what is allusion must pass unexplained. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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