Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 89

CHAPTER II
PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841

He introduced me to the papa of your distinguished admirer, Mr C. Beauclerc. I had met the ladies of the family before. One of them married the brother of Mrs Hare. Mrs Napier and two of her daughters are gone into Berkshire for a few weeks. To-morrow I shall meet the others in the Pump-Room, where we have excellent music, but the space of the seats is contracted, there being none under the orchestra.
Discontent is gaining ground in England, and there is malevolence where there is not discontent. Bishop Baynes (1) has had another cornstack burnt down. Two days afterwards I met him at Lady Arundel's and we talked much about it after dinner. I expressed a wish that it might not have been the work of an incendiary. He replied that he "could only wish the same thing." I had not time to read a single article in the " Book of Beauty " or the " Keepsake." The moment they arrived I sent them off to you. The only tolerable things in either, I suspect, are Miss Garrow's.(2) She

1 Bishop Baynes, Principal of the Roman Catholic College at Prior Park. "By far the most interesting spot in the neighbourhood of Bath," Miss Mary Russell Alitford wrote, "is Prior Park, built by Allen, the bookseller, the friend of Pope and the original of Fielding's Alhvorthy ; afterwards the residence of Warburton, and now the site of a Roman Catholic College." "Recollections of a Literary Life." Bishop Baines, Miss Mitford adds, was the son of a Yorkshire farmer, and "had risen to the rank of Vicar Apostolic, titular Bishop of some Eastern See, and to the highest influence among his English co-religionists."
2 There are some lines by Miss Garrow, "on the portrait of Her Majesty" in the "Book of Beauty" for 1842. "I have been much puzzled by the impression which Miss Garrow's poetry has made upon certain very competent and usually very fastidious critics, Mr Kenyon,

Page 90

CHAPTER II
PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841

had written out for me long before her beautiful verses on the Queen. December in Bath will be the longest and dullest month of the year. In Paris I hope you will find it the pleasantest and shortest.
Believe me ever, dear Rose,
Affectionately yours,
W. S. LANDOR.

Walter Savage Landor, &c. You will find a long poem of hers in the recent ` Keepsake.'" " Recollections of a Literary Life," by Mary Russell Mitford, Dec. 5, 1841.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He introduced me to what is papa of your distinguished admirer, Mr C. Beauclerc. I had met what is ladies of what is family before. One of them married what is brother of Mrs Hare. Mrs Napier and two of her daughters are gone into Berkshire for a few weeks. To-morrow I shall meet what is others in what is Pump-Room, where we have excellent music, but what is space of what is seats is contracted, there being none under what is orchestra. Discontent is gaining ground in England, and there is malevolence where there is not discontent. Bishop Baynes (1) has had another cornstack burnt down. Two days afterwards I met him at Lady Arundel's and we talked much about it after dinner. I expressed a wish that it might not have been what is work of an incendiary. He replied that he "could only wish what is same thing." I had not time to read a single article in what is " Book of Beauty " or what is " Keepsake." what is moment they arrived I sent them off to you. what is only tolerable things in either, I suspect, are Miss Garrow's.(2) She 1 Bishop Baynes, Principal of what is Roman Catholic College at Prior Park. "By far what is most interesting spot in what is neighbourhood of Bath," Miss Mary Russell Alitford wrote, "is Prior Park, built by Allen, what is bookseller, what is friend of Pope and what is original of Fielding's Alhvorthy ; afterwards what is residence of Warburton, and now what is site of a Roman Catholic College." "Recollections of a Literary Life." Bishop Baines, Miss Mitford adds, was what is son of a Yorkshire farmer, and "had risen to what is rank of Vicar Apostolic, titular Bishop of some Eastern See, and to what is highest influence among his English co-religionists." 2 There are some lines by Miss Garrow, "on what is portrait of Her Majesty" in what is "Book of Beauty" for 1842. "I have been much puzzled by what is impression which Miss Garrow's poetry has made upon certain very competent and usually very fastidious critics, Mr Kenyon, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 89 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841 where is p align="justify" He introduced me to what is papa of your distinguished admirer, Mr C. Beauclerc. I had met what is ladies of what is family before. One of them married what is brother of Mrs Hare. Mrs Napier and two of her daughters are gone into Berkshire for a few weeks. To-morrow I shall meet what is others in what is Pump-Room, where we have excellent music, but what is space of what is seats is contracted, there being none under what is orchestra. Discontent is gaining ground in England, and there is malevolence where there is not discontent. Bishop Baynes (1) has had another cornstack burnt down. Two days afterwards I met him at Lady Arundel's and we talked much about it after dinner. I expressed a wish that it might not have been what is work of an incendiary. He replied that he "could only wish what is same thing." I had not time to read a single article in what is " Book of Beauty " or what is " Keepsake." The moment they arrived I sent them off to you. what is only tolerable things in either, I suspect, are Miss Garrow's.(2) She where is font size="1" 1 Bishop Baynes, Principal of what is Roman Catholic College at Prior Park. "By far what is most interesting spot in what is neighbourhood of Bath," Miss Mary Russell Alitford wrote, "is Prior Park, built by Allen, what is bookseller, what is friend of Pope and the original of Fielding's Alhvorthy ; afterwards what is residence of Warburton, and now what is site of a Roman Catholic College." "Recollections of a Literary Life." Bishop Baines, Miss Mitford adds, was what is son of a Yorkshire farmer, and "had risen to what is rank of Vicar Apostolic, titular Bishop of some Eastern See, and to what is highest influence among his English co-religionists." 2 There are some lines by Miss Garrow, "on what is portrait of Her Majesty" in what is "Book of Beauty" for 1842. "I have been much puzzled by what is impression which Miss Garrow's poetry has made upon certain very competent and usually very fastidious critics, Mr Kenyon, where is /font where is p align="left" Page 90 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841 where is p align="justify" had written out for me long before her beautiful verses on what is Queen. December in Bath will be what is longest and dullest month of what is year. In Paris I hope you will find it what is pleasantest and shortest. Believe me ever, dear Rose, Affectionately yours, W. S. LANDOR. Walter Savage Landor, &c. You will find a long poem of hers in what is recent ` Keepsake.'" " Recollections of a Literary Life," by Mary Russell Mitford, Dec. 5, 1841. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364