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Page 86

CHAPTER II
PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841

finding out that it is there. Poor William Spencer, the delight of all society, lived unhappily with his wife, died far away from her and from his children, and received the last solaces of his existence from the assiduous and unwearied affection of Miss Poulter. You will be sorry to hear that Dickens(1) has been extremely unwell. Barnaby Rudge is drawing to a close, but something of equal ability is certain to succeed it.
I hope you sometimes by way of variety meet and converse with men of genius. Possibly they may not be the most desirable companions for a constancy ; but the intellect has its sympathies as well as the heart, and no one ever regretted the indulgence of them. I wish you may happen to meet with Madame Colmache.(2) She is an excellent person, free from all affectation, a good wife, a good mother, courteous, friendly, sincere, instructed, and intellectual. But your earliest days in Paris will require no addition to their brightness. Whether you would let me or not, there is no happiness of yours in which I do

1"He was still in his sick-room (Oct. 22, 1841), when he wrote: `I hope I shan't leave off any more, now, until I have finished Barnaby.' On Nov. 2, the printers received the close of Barnahy Rauke." Forster's " Life of Dickens." The next book was " Martin Chuzzlewit."
2 This lady, who is still living, was the wife of Talleyrand's private secretary. She gave Landor a pair of spectacles which had belonged to Talleyrand, and he gave them to Sir Henry Buhaer, who would value them, he said, even though, being a diplomatist, he could see through a brick wall.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE finding out that it is there. Poor William Spencer, what is delight of all society, lived unhappily with his wife, died far away from her and from his children, and received what is last solaces of his existence from what is assiduous and unwearied affection of Miss Poulter. You will be sorry to hear that Dickens(1) has been extremely unwell. Barnaby Rudge is drawing to a close, but something of equal ability is certain to succeed it. I hope you sometimes by way of variety meet and converse with men of genius. Possibly they may not be what is most desirable companions for a constancy ; but what is intellect has its sympathies as well as what is heart, and no one ever regretted what is indulgence of them. I wish you may happen to meet with Madame Colmache.(2) She is an excellent person, free from all affectation, a good wife, a good mother, courteous, friendly, sincere, instructed, and intellectual. But your earliest days in Paris will require no addition to their brightness. Whether you would let me or not, there is no happiness of yours in which I do 1"He was still in his sick-room (Oct. 22, 1841), when he wrote: `I hope I shan't leave off any more, now, until I have finished Barnaby.' On Nov. 2, what is printers received what is close of Barnahy Rauke." Forster's " Life of Dickens." what is next book was " Martin Chuzzlewit." 2 This lady, who is still living, was what is wife of Talleyrand's private secretary. She gave Landor a pair of spectacles which had belonged to Talleyrand, and he gave them to Sir Henry Buhaer, who would value them, he said, even though, being a diplomatist, he could see through a brick wall. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 86 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841 where is p align="justify" finding out that it is there. Poor William Spencer, what is delight of all society, lived unhappily with his wife, died far away from her and from his children, and received what is last solaces of his existence from what is assiduous and unwearied affection of Miss Poulter. You will be sorry to hear that Dickens(1) has been extremely unwell. Barnaby Rudge is drawing to a close, but something of equal ability is certain to succeed it. I hope you sometimes by way of variety meet and converse with men of genius. Possibly they may not be what is most desirable companions for a constancy ; but what is intellect has its sympathies as well as what is heart, and no one ever regretted what is indulgence of them. I wish you may happen to meet with Madame Colmache.(2) She is an excellent person, free from all affectation, a good wife, a good mother, courteous, friendly, sincere, instructed, and intellectual. But your earliest days in Paris will require no addition to their brightness. Whether you would let me or not, there is no happiness of yours in which I do where is font size="2" 1"He was still in his sick-room (Oct. 22, 1841), when he wrote: `I hope I shan't leave off any more, now, until I have finished Barnaby.' On Nov. 2, what is printers received what is close of Barnahy Rauke." Forster's " Life of Dickens." what is next book was " Martin Chuzzlewit." 2 This lady, who is still living, was what is wife of Talleyrand's private secretary. She gave Landor a pair of spectacles which had belonged to Talleyrand, and he gave them to Sir Henry Buhaer, who would value them, he said, even though, being a diplomatist, he could see through a brick wall. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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