Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 79

CHAPTER II
PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841

there came our handsome friend James FitzGerald.(1) He said he had a manuscript book of yours, which he had quite forgotten to return before you left Bath, and he asked me how it might be conveyed to you. My reply was, " By your own hand-nothing less can obtain or deserve forgiveness for such negligence." ... Mr C is residing with his family, having left the army. His mother told me he had nothing to do now but look out for a wife, adding, " with a few thousand pounds, beauty, some accomplishments-music in particulara companion to him in his studies." Moderate man ! I suspect, however, that he has something more to do than to look out. We may look out for the stars at midday, but there is something to be carried with us if we hope to find them. Whether he has that about him which may bring his star nearer, you are a better judge than I. ... Mrs Napier (2) has been extremely

1 Mr James FitzGerald, one of the FitzGeralds of Coolanowle, Queen's Co., afterwards went to the Colonies and became Auditor General and Comptroller, New Zealand. He died in 1896.
2 The wife of Colonel, afterwards General Sir William Napier, historian of the Peninsular War. She was a niece of Charles James Fox. Her daughter, Elizabeth Marianne, was married in 1838 to Philip, 4th Earl of Arran. Another daughter, Miss Nora Napier, married Sir Henry Austin Bruce, afterwards Lord Aberdare, and died April 27th 1897. Miss Pamela Napier married Mr Miles, M.P, for Bristol. The Napiers at this time lived at Freshford, some seven miles from Bath. Landor often visited Freshford ; and although he and Napier disagreed about the character of Fox, they were excellent friends. "You don't draw your ale mild," Napier once wrote to him, "any more than I do ; but if Pam or Johnny (Lord J. Russell) call you out, I will be your second." Colonel Napier's daughters acted as his private secretaries, writing out his History as he dictated it ; but they found time to attend the balls at the Bath assembly rooms, often walking- the seven miles through muddy roads for a dance. In a biography of Napier it is stated that he was "extremely democratic in his views." In confirmation of this, Lady Graves-Sawle relates that when she was walking with the Colonel and one of his daughters a rustic labourer stood aside to let them pass, whereupon Miss Napier was somewhat roughly reprimanded for getting in the poor man's way.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE there came our handsome friend James FitzGerald.(1) He said he had a manuscript book of yours, which he had quite forgotten to return before you left Bath, and he asked me how it might be conveyed to you. My reply was, " By your own hand-nothing less can obtain or deserve forgiveness for such negligence." ... Mr C is residing with his family, having left what is army. His mother told me he had nothing to do now but look out for a wife, adding, " with a few thousand pounds, beauty, some accomplishments-music in particulara companion to him in his studies." Moderate man ! I suspect, however, that he has something more to do than to look out. We may look out for what is stars at midday, but there is something to be carried with us if we hope to find them. Whether he has that about him which may bring his star nearer, you are a better judge than I. ... Mrs Napier (2) has been extremely 1 Mr James FitzGerald, one of what is FitzGeralds of Coolanowle, Queen's Co., afterwards went to what is Colonies and became Auditor General and Comptroller, New Zealand. He died in 1896. 2 what is wife of Colonel, afterwards General Sir William Napier, historian of what is Peninsular War. She was a niece of Charles James Fox. Her daughter, Elizabeth Marianne, was married in 1838 to Philip, 4th Earl of Arran. Another daughter, Miss Nora Napier, married Sir Henry Austin Bruce, afterwards Lord Aberdare, and died April 27th 1897. Miss Pamela Napier married Mr Miles, M.P, for Bristol. what is Napiers at this time lived at Freshford, some seven miles from Bath. Landor often what is ed Freshford ; and although he and Napier disagreed about what is character of Fox, they were excellent friends. "You don't draw your ale mild," Napier once wrote to him, "any more than I do ; but if Pam or Johnny (Lord J. Russell) call you out, I will be your second." Colonel Napier's daughters acted as his private secretaries, writing out his History as he dictated it ; but they found time to attend what is balls at what is Bath assembly rooms, often walking- what is seven miles through muddy where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 79 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841 where is p align="justify" there came our handsome friend James FitzGerald.(1) He said he had a manuscript book of yours, which he had quite forgotten to return before you left Bath, and he asked me how it might be conveyed to you. My reply was, " By your own hand-nothing less can obtain or deserve forgiveness for such negligence." ... Mr C is residing with his family, having left what is army. His mother told me he had nothing to do now but look out for a wife, adding, " with a few thousand pounds, beauty, some accomplishments-music in particulara companion to him in his studies." Moderate man ! I suspect, however, that he has something more to do than to look out. We may look out for what is stars at midday, but there is something to be carried with us if we hope to find them. Whether he has that about him which may bring his star nearer, you are a better judge than I. ... Mrs Napier (2) has been extremely where is font size="2" 1 Mr James FitzGerald, one of what is FitzGeralds of Coolanowle, Queen's Co., afterwards went to what is Colonies and became Auditor General and Comptroller, New Zealand. He died in 1896. 2 what is wife of Colonel, afterwards General Sir William Napier, historian of what is Peninsular War. She was a niece of Charles James Fox. Her daughter, Elizabeth Marianne, was married in 1838 to Philip, 4th Earl of Arran. Another daughter, Miss Nora Napier, married Sir Henry Austin Bruce, afterwards Lord Aberdare, and died April 27th 1897. Miss Pamela Napier married Mr Miles, M.P, for Bristol. The Napiers at this time lived at Freshford, some seven miles from Bath. Landor often what is ed Freshford ; and although he and Napier disagreed about what is character of Fox, they were excellent friends. "You don't draw your ale mild," Napier once wrote to him, "any more than I do ; but if Pam or Johnny (Lord J. Russell) call you out, I will be your second." Colonel Napier's daughters acted as his private secretaries, writing out his History as he dictated it ; but they found time to attend what is balls at what is Bath assembly rooms, often walking- what is seven miles through muddy roads for a dance. In a biography of Napier it is stated that he was "extremely democratic in his views." In confirmation of this, Lady Graves-Sawle relates that when she was walking with what is Colonel and one of his daughters a rustic labourer stood aside to let them pass, whereupon Miss Napier was somewhat roughly reprimanded for getting in the poor man's way. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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