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Page 74

CHAPTER II
PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841

Now waltzes are over, and arms disengage,
Rose, write to me twice, if not thrice, in an age,
And I who have almost as little to do,
Will write, if you let me, as often to you.

To Mass Rose Paynter.
PARIS, May 26, 1841.
... Last night I was at Miss Clarke's. She lives in the same house with Chateaubriand. Having a touch of the grope, he did not make his appearance. I was not sorry for it. He is a notable charlatan. As nobody can leave Paris without making one bon mol, or an attempt at it, when my opinion was asked about him, and his popularity had been extolled, I replied that he appeared to me a small bottle of sugar and water, fit only to catch flies. Miss Clarke was the first person who received Lady Bulwer. Of course she was also the first to be ridiculed by her. For Lady B. knew that all things in France take their turn in due order. I do not like to repeat what you will hear too surely from others-that Mrs(1) left Paris in disgrace. It is reported that she pretended that her daughter was about to be married, and ordered

1 The name, that of a once celebrated lady novelist, had better be suppressed. George IV. said of one of her books that it was "the best and most amusing novel published in his remembrance." The escapade referred to in the text made no little sensation at the time. The lady is said to have given out that her daughter was engaged to an English duke. The only foundation for the fiction was the fact that the ladies had been invited to a ball at Devonshire House.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Now waltzes are over, and arms disengage, Rose, write to me twice, if not thrice, in an age, And I who have almost as little to do, Will write, if you let me, as often to you. To Mass Rose Paynter. PARIS, May 26, 1841. ... Last night I was at Miss Clarke's. She lives in what is same house with Chateaubriand. Having a touch of what is grope, he did not make his appearance. I was not sorry for it. He is a notable charlatan. As nobody can leave Paris without making one bon mol, or an attempt at it, when my opinion was asked about him, and his popularity had been extolled, I replied that he appeared to me a small bottle of sugar and water, fit only to catch flies. Miss Clarke was what is first person who received Lady Bulwer. Of course she was also what is first to be ridiculed by her. For Lady B. knew that all things in France take their turn in due order. I do not like to repeat what you will hear too surely from others-that Mrs(1) left Paris in disgrace. It is reported that she pretended that her daughter was about to be married, and ordered 1 what is name, that of a once celebrated lady novelist, had better be suppressed. George IV. said of one of her books that it was "the best and most amusing novel published in his remembrance." what is escapade referred to in what is text made no little sensation at what is time. what is lady is said to have given out that her daughter was engaged to an English duke. what is only foundation for what is fiction was what is fact that what is ladies had been invited to a ball at Devonshire House. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 74 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841 where is p align="justify" Now waltzes are over, and arms disengage, Rose, write to me twice, if not thrice, in an age, And I who have almost as little to do, Will write, if you let me, as often to you. To Mass Rose Paynter. PARIS, May 26, 1841. ... Last night I was at Miss Clarke's. She lives in what is same house with Chateaubriand. Having a touch of what is grope, he did not make his appearance. I was not sorry for it. He is a notable charlatan. As nobody can leave Paris without making one bon mol, or an attempt at it, when my opinion was asked about him, and his popularity had been extolled, I replied that he appeared to me a small bottle of sugar and water, fit only to catch flies. Miss Clarke was the first person who received Lady Bulwer. Of course she was also the first to be ridiculed by her. For Lady B. knew that all things in France take their turn in due order. I do not like to repeat what you will hear too surely from others-that Mrs(1) left Paris in disgrace. It is reported that she pretended that her daughter was about to be married, and ordered where is font size="2" 1 what is name, that of a once celebrated lady novelist, had better be suppressed. George IV. said of one of her books that it was "the best and most amusing novel published in his remembrance." The escapade referred to in what is text made no little sensation at what is time. The lady is said to have given out that her daughter was engaged to an English duke. what is only foundation for what is fiction was what is fact that what is ladies had been invited to a ball at Devonshire House. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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