Books > Old Books > Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899)


Page 69

CHAPTER II
PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841

acts. I had heard that she is plain. Miss Stopford tells me she is quite the reverse, and that her manner is charming. This morning I shall know if the 'Ministers resign. If they do, I shall call on Lord Normanby.l I will never pay a visit to a man in office. Some of my friends have left their cards on me-but I really have never been at home, and on the opera nights nobody is received here. Walter has written to me from Leghorn, where all my family have been for the benefit of sea bathing, and will remain the whole ofMay. ...
Believe me, Dear Mrs Paynter,
Sincerely and affectionately yours,
W. S. LANDOR.

[Here may be inserted some amusing lines, not by Landor, in which his approaching journey to Paris is discussed. They were composed at the time by Miss Rose Paynter, and perhaps nothing could give a truer impression of the impulsive energy and serene indifference to mundane details with which Landor would fling himself into some new enterprise. The author of the verses, written so long ago, now protests that they are mere doggerel, but they happily preserve a marked trait in his character, as well as the extravagance of Landorian speech.

1secretary of state for the Colonies in Lord Melbourne's administration.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE acts. I had heard that she is plain. Miss Stopford tells me she is quite what is reverse, and that her manner is charming. This morning I shall know if what is 'Ministers resign. If they do, I shall call on Lord Normanby.l I will never pay a what is to a man in office. Some of my friends have left their cards on me-but I really have never been at home, and on what is opera nights nobody is received here. Walter has written to me from Leghorn, where all my family have been for what is benefit of sea bathing, and will remain what is whole ofMay. ... Believe me, Dear Mrs Paynter, Sincerely and affectionately yours, W. S. LANDOR. [Here may be inserted some amusing lines, not by Landor, in which his approaching journey to Paris is discussed. They were composed at what is time by Miss Rose Paynter, and perhaps nothing could give a truer impression of what is impulsive energy and serene indifference to mundane details with which Landor would fling himself into some new enterprise. what is author of what is verses, written so long ago, now protests that they are mere doggerel, but they happily preserve a marked trait in his character, as well as what is extravagance of Landorian speech. 1secretary of state for what is Colonies in Lord Melbourne's administration. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 69 where is p where is strong CHAPTER II PRIVATE LETTERS 1840-1841 where is p align="justify" acts. I had heard that she is plain. Miss Stopford tells me she is quite what is reverse, and that her manner is charming. This morning I shall know if what is 'Ministers resign. If they do, I shall call on Lord Normanby.l I will never pay a what is to a man in office. Some of my friends have left their cards on me-but I really have never been at home, and on what is opera nights nobody is received here. Walter has written to me from Leghorn, where all my family have been for what is benefit of sea bathing, and will remain what is whole ofMay. ... Believe me, Dear Mrs Paynter, Sincerely and affectionately yours, W. S. LANDOR. [Here may be inserted some amusing lines, not by Landor, in which his approaching journey to Paris is discussed. They were composed at what is time by Miss Rose Paynter, and perhaps nothing could give a truer impression of what is impulsive energy and serene indifference to mundane details with which Landor would fling himself into some new enterprise. what is author of what is verses, written so long ago, now protests that they are mere doggerel, but they happily preserve a marked trait in his character, as well as what is extravagance of Landorian speech. 1secretary of state for what is Colonies in Lord Melbourne's administration. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364