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Page 37

CHAPTER I
PRIVATE LETTERS 1838 - 1839

To Mrs Payyzter, at Lord Aylyney's, Passy.
[BATH, Sejhtember 1839]
DEAR MRS PAYNTER,
Beyond a doubt and beyond a comparison, you will think me the most troublesome man in the world to call your attention day after day to my illegibilities. To-day I was at your house to see the garden put in order. The cook requested me to go down below and just look at the walls. It grieves me to tell you that they are just as damp as ever. ... I may be imprudent in doing it myself; but when I think how grievously you have suffered from the rheumatism, and how lately poor Sophy has been tortured with a malady which dampness usually produces and always aggravates, I could not defer the intelligence, however unpleasant. ... I was afraid you might think me presumptuous and intermeddling, otherwise I would instantly have set a couple of masons to work. ... Do me the favour to give me your directions, and for once in my life I will be a man of business. Happy as I shall be to see you all back again, I must confess I would rather there were any delay than that you should have the almost inevitable evils of a damp house. ...
I have been buying a fine Rubens-a lion.(1)

1 Some friends of Landor's, to whom he showed this doubtful masterpiece, could only restrain their hilarity while they were with him. Then, as they walked back to their hotel, at midnight, the usually quiet streets of Bath rang with their inextinguishable laughter, with which were mingled "Roars for the lion !" One of these jovial art-critics was Charles Dickens. Lady Graves-Sawle told me this story.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE To Mrs Payyzter, at Lord Aylyney's, Passy. [BATH, Sejhtember 1839] DEAR MRS PAYNTER, Beyond a doubt and beyond a comparison, you will think me what is most troublesome man in what is world to call your attention day after day to my illegibilities. To-day I was at your house to see what is garden put in order. what is cook requested me to go down below and just look at what is walls. It grieves me to tell you that they are just as damp as ever. ... I may be imprudent in doing it myself; but when I think how grievously you have suffered from what is rheumatism, and how lately poor Sophy has been tortured with a malady which dampness usually produces and always aggravates, I could not defer what is intelligence, however unpleasant. ... I was afraid you might think me presumptuous and intermeddling, otherwise I would instantly have set a couple of masons to work. ... Do me what is favour to give me your directions, and for once in my life I will be a man of business. Happy as I shall be to see you all back again, I must confess I would rather there were any delay than that you should have what is almost inevitable evils of a damp house. ... I have been buying a fine Rubens-a lion.(1) 1 Some friends of Landor's, to whom he showed this doubtful masterpiece, could only restrain their hilarity while they were with him. Then, as they walked back to their hotel, at midnight, what is usually quiet streets of Bath rang with their inextinguishable laughter, with which were where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Letters of Walter Savage Landor (1899) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 37 where is p where is strong CHAPTER I PRIVATE LETTERS 1838 - 1839 where is p align="justify" To Mrs Payyzter, at Lord Aylyney's, Passy. [BATH, Sejhtember 1839] DEAR MRS PAYNTER, Beyond a doubt and beyond a comparison, you will think me what is most troublesome man in what is world to call your attention day after day to my illegibilities. To-day I was at your house to see what is garden put in order. what is cook requested me to go down below and just look at what is walls. It grieves me to tell you that they are just as damp as ever. ... I may be imprudent in doing it myself; but when I think how grievously you have suffered from what is rheumatism, and how lately poor Sophy has been tortured with a malady which dampness usually produces and always aggravates, I could not defer what is intelligence, however unpleasant. ... I was afraid you might think me presumptuous and intermeddling, otherwise I would instantly have set a couple of masons to work. ... Do me what is favour to give me your directions, and for once in my life I will be a man of business. Happy as I shall be to see you all back again, I must confess I would rather there were any delay than that you should have what is almost inevitable evils of a damp house. ... I have been buying a fine Rubens-a lion.(1) where is font size="2" 1 Some friends of Landor's, to whom he showed this doubtful masterpiece, could only restrain their hilarity while they were with him. Then, as they walked back to their hotel, at midnight, what is usually quiet streets of Bath rang with their inextinguishable laughter, with which were mingled "Roars for what is lion !" One of these jovial art-critics was Charles Dickens. Lady Graves-Sawle told me this story. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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