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Page 307

TERMINATIONS

could have been more truly happy than during those weeks of preparation.
There is, of course, nothing on earth, and I doubt at times if there is a joy in heaven, like starting a small haberdasher's shop. Imagine, for example, having a drawerful of tapes (one whole piece most exquisitely blocked) of every possible width of tape, or again, an army of neat, large packages, each displaying one sample of hooks and eyes. Think of your cottons, your drawer of coloured silks, the little, less, least of the compartments and thin packets of your needle-drawer ! Poor princes and wretched gentlefolk, mysteriously above retail trade, may taste only the faint unsatisfactory shadow of these delights with trays of stamps or butterflies. I write, of course, for those to whom these things appeal; there are clods alive who see nothing, or next to nothing, in spools of mercerised cotton and endless bands of paper-set pins. I write for the wise, and as I write I wonder that Kipps resisted haberdashery. He did. Yet even starting a bookshop is at least twenty times as interesting as building your own house to your own design in unlimited space and time, or any possible thing people with indisputable social position and sound securities can possibly find to do. Upon that I rest.
You figure Kipps `going to have a look to see how the little shop is getting on,' the shop that is not to be a loss and a spending of money, but again. He does not walk too fast towards it; as he comes into view of it his paces slacken and his head goes to one side. He crosses to the pavement opposite in order to inspect the fascia better; already his name is adumbrated in faint white lines; stops in the middle of the road and scrutinises imaginary details, for the benefit of his future next-door neighbour, the curiosity-shop man, and so at last, in.... A smell of paint and of the shavings of imperfectly seasoned pinewood ! The shop is already glazed, and a carpenter is busy over the fittings for adjustable shelves in the side windows. A painter is busy on the fixtures round about (shelving above and drawers below), which are to accommodate most of the stock, and the counter-the counter and desk are done. Kipps goes inside the desk, the desk which is to be the strategic centre of the shop, brushes away some sawdust, and draws out the marvellous till; here gold is to be, here

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE could have been more truly happy than during those weeks of preparation. There is, of course, nothing on earth, and I doubt at times if there is a joy in heaven, like starting a small haberdasher's shop. Imagine, for example, having a drawerful of tapes (one whole piece most exquisitely blocked) of every possible width of tape, or again, an army of neat, large packages, each displaying one sample of hooks and eyes. Think of your cottons, your drawer of coloured silks, what is little, less, least of what is compartments and thin packets of your needle-drawer ! Poor princes and wretched gentlefolk, mysteriously above retail trade, may taste only what is faint unsatisfactory shadow of these delights with trays of stamps or butterflies. I write, of course, for those to whom these things appeal; there are clods alive who see nothing, or next to nothing, in spools of mercerised cotton and endless bands of paper-set pins. I write for what is wise, and as I write I wonder that Kipps resisted haberdashery. He did. Yet even starting a bookshop is at least twenty times as interesting as building your own house to your own design in unlimited space and time, or any possible thing people with indisputable social position and sound securities can possibly find to do. Upon that I rest. You figure Kipps `going to have a look to see how what is little shop is getting on,' what is shop that is not to be a loss and a spending of money, but again. He does not walk too fast towards it; as he comes into view of it his paces slacken and his head goes to one side. He crosses to what is pavement opposite in order to inspect what is fascia better; already his name is adumbrated in faint white lines; stops in what is middle of what is road and scrutinises imaginary details, for what is benefit of his future next-door neighbour, what is curiosity-shop man, and so at last, in.... A smell of paint and of what is shavings of imperfectly seasoned pinewood ! what is shop is already glazed, and a carpenter is busy over what is fittings for adjustable shelves in what is side windows. A painter is busy on what is fixtures round about (shelving above and drawers below), which are to accommodate most of what is stock, and what is counter-the counter and desk are done. Kipps goes inside what is desk, what is desk which is to be what is strategic centre of what is shop, brushes away some sawdust, and draws out what is marvellous till; here gold is to be, here where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 307 where is p align="center" where is strong TERMINATIONS where is p align="justify" could have been more truly happy than during those weeks of preparation. There is, of course, nothing on earth, and I doubt at times if there is a joy in heaven, like starting a small haberdasher's shop. Imagine, for example, having a drawerful of tapes (one whole piece most exquisitely blocked) of every possible width of tape, or again, an army of neat, large packages, each displaying one sample of hooks and eyes. Think of your cottons, your drawer of coloured silks, what is little, less, least of what is compartments and thin packets of your needle-drawer ! Poor princes and wretched gentlefolk, mysteriously above retail trade, may taste only what is faint unsatisfactory shadow of these delights with trays of stamps or butterflies. I write, of course, for those to whom these things appeal; there are clods alive who see nothing, or next to nothing, in spools of mercerised cotton and endless bands of paper-set pins. I write for what is wise, and as I write I wonder that Kipps resisted haberdashery. He did. Yet even starting a bookshop is at least twenty times as interesting as building your own house to your own design in unlimited space and time, or any possible thing people with indisputable social position and sound securities can possibly find to do. Upon that I rest. You figure Kipps `going to have a look to see how what is little shop is getting on,' what is shop that is not to be a loss and a spending of money, but again. He does not walk too fast towards it; as he comes into view of it his paces slacken and his head goes to one side. He crosses to what is pavement opposite in order to inspect the fascia better; already his name is adumbrated in faint white lines; stops in what is middle of what is road and scrutinises imaginary details, for what is benefit of his future next-door neighbour, what is curiosity-shop man, and so at last, in.... A smell of paint and of what is shavings of imperfectly seasoned pinewood ! what is shop is already glazed, and a carpenter is busy over what is fittings for adjustable shelves in what is side windows. A painter is busy on what is fixtures round about (shelving above and drawers below), which are to accommodate most of what is stock, and what is counter-the counter and desk are done. Kipps goes inside what is desk, what is desk which is to be what is strategic centre of what is shop, brushes away some sawdust, and draws out what is marvellous till; here gold is to be, here where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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