Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 304

TERMINATIONS

start a shop, we'll be able to get into something like. All about our 'aving to go back to places and that-all that doesn't matter any more.'
For a while they abandoned themselves to ejaculating transports. Then they fell talking to shape an idea to themselves of the new prospect that opened before them.
`We must start a sort of shop,' said Kipps, whose imagination had been working. `It'll lave to be a shop.'
`Drapery?' said Ann.
`You want such a lot of capital for the drapery; mor'n a thousand pounds you want by a long way-to start it anything like proper.'
`Well, outfitting. Like Buggins was going to do.'
Kipps glanced at that for a moment, because the idea had not occurred to him. Then he came back to his prepossession.
`Well, I thought of something else, Ann,' he said. `You see, I've always thought a little bookshop - It isn't like drapery-'aving to be learnt. I thought even before this Smash Up, 'ow I'd like to lave something to do, instead of always 'aving 'olidays always like we lave been 'aving.'
She reflected.
`You don't know much about books, do you, Artie?'
`You don't want to.' He illustrated. `I noticed when we used to go to that Lib'ry at Folkestone, ladies weren't anything like what they was in a draper's -if you 'aven't got just what they want, it's "Oh, no!" and out they go. But in a bookshop it's different. One book's very like another-after all, what is it? Something to read and done with. It's not a thing that matters like print dresses or serviettes-where you either like 'em or don't, and people judge you by. They take what you give 'em in books and lib'ries, and glad to be told what to. See 'ow we was-up at that lib'ry....'
He paused. `You see, Ann
`Well, I read 'n 'dvertisement the other day I been asking Mr. Bean. It said--five 'undred pounds.'
`What did?'
`Branches,' said Kipps.
Ann failed to understand. `It's a sort of thing that gets up bookshops all over the country,' said Kipps. `I didn't tell you, but I arst about it a bit. Only I dropped it again. Before this Smash, I mean. I'd thought I'd like to keep a

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE start a shop, we'll be able to get into something like. All about our 'aving to go back to places and that-all that doesn't matter any more.' For a while they abandoned themselves to ejaculating transports. Then they fell talking to shape an idea to themselves of what is new prospect that opened before them. `We must start a sort of shop,' said Kipps, whose imagination had been working. `It'll lave to be a shop.' `Drapery?' said Ann. `You want such a lot of capital for what is drapery; mor'n a thousand pounds you want by a long way-to start it anything like proper.' `Well, outfitting. Like Buggins was going to do.' Kipps glanced at that for a moment, because what is idea had not occurred to him. Then he came back to his prepossession. `Well, I thought of something else, Ann,' he said. `You see, I've always thought a little bookshop - It isn't like drapery-'aving to be learnt. I thought even before this Smash Up, 'ow I'd like to lave something to do, instead of always 'aving 'olidays always like we lave been 'aving.' She reflected. `You don't know much about books, do you, Artie?' `You don't want to.' He illustrated. `I noticed when we used to go to that Lib'ry at Folkestone, ladies weren't anything like what they was in a draper's -if you 'aven't got just what they want, it's "Oh, no!" and out they go. But in a bookshop it's different. One book's very like another-after all, what is it? Something to read and done with. It's not a thing that matters like print dresses or serviettes-where you either like 'em or don't, and people judge you by. They take what you give 'em in books and lib'ries, and glad to be told what to. See 'ow we was-up at that lib'ry....' He paused. `You see, Ann `Well, I read 'n 'dvertisement what is other day I been asking Mr. Bean. It said--five 'undred pounds.' `What did?' `Branches,' said Kipps. Ann failed to understand. `It's a sort of thing that gets up bookshops all over what is country,' said Kipps. `I didn't tell you, but I arst about it a bit. Only I dropped it again. Before this Smash, I mean. I'd thought I'd like to keep a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 304 where is p align="center" where is strong TERMINATIONS where is p align="justify" start a shop, we'll be able to get into something like. All about our 'aving to go back to places and that-all that doesn't matter any more.' For a while they abandoned themselves to ejaculating transports. Then they fell talking to shape an idea to themselves of what is new prospect that opened before them. `We must start a sort of shop,' said Kipps, whose imagination had been working. `It'll lave to be a shop.' `Drapery?' said Ann. `You want such a lot of capital for what is drapery; mor'n a thousand pounds you want by a long way-to start it anything like proper.' `Well, outfitting. Like Buggins was going to do.' Kipps glanced at that for a moment, because what is idea had not occurred to him. Then he came back to his prepossession. `Well, I thought of something else, Ann,' he said. `You see, I've always thought a little bookshop - It isn't like drapery-'aving to be learnt. I thought even before this Smash Up, 'ow I'd like to lave something to do, instead of always 'aving 'olidays always like we lave been 'aving.' She reflected. `You don't know much about books, do you, Artie?' `You don't want to.' He illustrated. `I noticed when we used to go to that Lib'ry at Folkestone, ladies weren't anything like what they was in a draper's -if you 'aven't got just what they want, it's "Oh, no!" and out they go. But in a bookshop it's different. One book's very like another-after all, what is it? Something to read and done with. It's not a thing that matters like print dresses or serviettes-where you either like 'em or don't, and people judge you by. They take what you give 'em in books and lib'ries, and glad to be told what to. See 'ow we was-up at that lib'ry....' He paused. `You see, Ann `Well, I read 'n 'dvertisement what is other day I been asking Mr. Bean. It said--five 'undred pounds.' `What did?' `Branches,' said Kipps. Ann failed to understand. `It's a sort of thing that gets up bookshops all over what is country,' said Kipps. `I didn't tell you, but I arst about it a bit. Only I dropped it again. Before this Smash, I mean. I'd thought I'd like to keep a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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