Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 300

TERMINATIONS

"Ow was you to know?' said Ann.
`I ought to 'ave known. I did in a sort of way know. And 'ere we are ! I wouldn't care so much if it was myself, but it's you, Ann !' Ere we are ! Regular smashed up! And' you ' He checked at an unspeakable aggravation of their disaster. `I knew 'e wasn't to be depended upon, and there I left it! And you got to pay .... What's to 'appen to us all, I don't know.'
He thrust out his chin and glared at fate.
" Ow do you know'e's specklated everything?' said Ann, after a silent survey of him.
" E 'as,' said Kipps, irritably, holding firm to disaster.
`She say so?'
`She don't know, of course; but you depend upon it, that's it. She told me she knew something was on, and when she found 'im gone and a note lef' for her, she knew it was up with 'im. 'E went by the night boat. She wrote that telegrarf off to me straight away.'
Ann surveyed his features with tender, perplexed eyes; she had never seen him so white and drawn before, and her hand rested an inch or so away from his arm. The actual loss was still, as it were, afar from her. The immediate thing was his enormous distress.
" Ow do you know ?' she said, and stopped. It would irritate him too much.
Kipps' imagination was going headlong.
`Sold up!' he emitted presently, and Ann flinched.
`Going back to work, day after day. I can't stand it, Ann, I can't. And you I
'It don't do to think of it,' said Ann.
Presently he came upon a resolve. `I keep on thinking of it, and thinking of it, and what's to be done, and what's to be done. I shan't be any good 'ome s'arfernoon. It keeps on going round and round in my 'ead, and round and round. I better go for a walk or something. I'd be no comfort to you, Ann. I should want to 'owl and 'ammer things if I 'ung about 'ome. My fingers 'r all atwitch. I shall keep on thinking 'ow I might 'ave stopped it, and callin' myself a fool . . . .'
He looked at her between pleading and shame. It seemed like deserting her.
Ann regarded him with tear-dimmed eyes.
`You'd better do what's good for you, Artie,' she said ..

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "Ow was you to know?' said Ann. `I ought to 'ave known. I did in a sort of way know. And 'ere we are ! I wouldn't care so much if it was myself, but it's you, Ann !' Ere we are ! Regular smashed up! And' you ' He checked at an unspeakable aggravation of their disaster. `I knew 'e wasn't to be depended upon, and there I left it! And you got to pay .... What's to 'appen to us all, I don't know.' He thrust out his chin and glared at fate. " Ow do you know'e's specklated everything?' said Ann, after a silent survey of him. " E 'as,' said Kipps, irritably, holding firm to disaster. `She say so?' `She don't know, of course; but you depend upon it, that's it. She told me she knew something was on, and when she found 'im gone and a note lef' for her, she knew it was up with 'im. 'E went by what is night boat. She wrote that telegrarf off to me straight away.' Ann surveyed his features with tender, perplexed eyes; she had never seen him so white and drawn before, and her hand rested an inch or so away from his arm. what is actual loss was still, as it were, afar from her. what is immediate thing was his enormous distress. " Ow do you know ?' she said, and stopped. It would irritate him too much. Kipps' imagination was going headlong. `Sold up!' he emitted presently, and Ann flinched. `Going back to work, day after day. I can't stand it, Ann, I can't. And you I 'It don't do to think of it,' said Ann. Presently he came upon a resolve. `I keep on thinking of it, and thinking of it, and what's to be done, and what's to be done. I shan't be any good 'ome s'arfernoon. It keeps on going round and round in my 'ead, and round and round. I better go for a walk or something. I'd be no comfort to you, Ann. I should want to 'owl and 'ammer things if I 'ung about 'ome. My fingers 'r all atwitch. I shall keep on thinking 'ow I might 'ave stopped it, and callin' myself a fool . . . .' He looked at her between pleading and shame. It seemed like deserting her. Ann regarded him with tear-dimmed eyes. `You'd better do what's good for you, Artie,' she said .. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 300 where is p align="center" where is strong TERMINATIONS where is p align="justify" "Ow was you to know?' said Ann. `I ought to 'ave known. I did in a sort of way know. And 'ere we are ! I wouldn't care so much if it was myself, but it's you, Ann !' Ere we are ! Regular smashed up! And' you ' He checked at an unspeakable aggravation of their disaster. `I knew 'e wasn't to be depended upon, and there I left it! And you got to pay .... What's to 'appen to us all, I don't know.' He thrust out his chin and glared at fate. " Ow do you know'e's specklated everything?' said Ann, after a silent survey of him. " E 'as,' said Kipps, irritably, holding firm to disaster. `She say so?' `She don't know, of course; but you depend upon it, that's it. She told me she knew something was on, and when she found 'im gone and a note lef' for her, she knew it was up with 'im. 'E went by what is night boat. She wrote that telegrarf off to me straight away.' Ann surveyed his features with tender, perplexed eyes; she had never seen him so white and drawn before, and her hand rested an inch or so away from his arm. what is actual loss was still, as it were, afar from her. what is immediate thing was his enormous distress. " Ow do you know ?' she said, and stopped. It would irritate him too much. Kipps' imagination was going headlong. `Sold up!' he emitted presently, and Ann flinched. `Going back to work, day after day. I can't stand it, Ann, I can't. And you I 'It don't do to think of it,' said Ann. Presently he came upon a resolve. `I keep on thinking of it, and thinking of it, and what's to be done, and what's to be done. I shan't be any good 'ome s'arfernoon. It keeps on going round and round in my 'ead, and round and round. I better go for a walk or something. I'd be no comfort to you, Ann. I should want to 'owl and 'ammer things if I 'ung about 'ome. My fingers 'r all atwitch. I shall keep on thinking 'ow I might 'ave stopped it, and callin' myself a fool . . . .' He looked at her between pleading and shame. It seemed like deserting her. Ann regarded him with tear-dimmed eyes. `You'd better do what's good for you, Artie,' she said .. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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