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Page 299

TERMINATIONS

The midday meal spread itself slowly before them. Gwendolen, after her custom, left the door open, and Kipps closed it carefully before sitting down.
He stood for a moment, regarding the meal doubtfully.
`I don't feel as if I could swaller a moufful,' he said.
`You got to eat,' said Ann ....
For a time they said little, and once swallowing was achieved, ate on with a sort of melancholy appetite. Each was now busy thinking.
`After all,' said Kipps, presently, `whatever 'appens they can't turn us out or sell us up before nex' quarter day. I'm pretty sure about that.'
`Sell us up!' said Ann.
`I dessay we're bankrup',' said Kipps, trying to say it easily, and helping himself with a trembling hand to unnecessary potatoes.
Then a long silence. Ann ceased to eat, and there were silent tears.
`More potatoes, Artie?' choked Ann.
`I couldn't,' said Kipps. `No.'
He pushed back his plate, which was indeed replete with potatoes, got up and walked about the room. Even the dinner-table looked distraught and unusual.
`What to do, I don't know,' he said.
`Oh, Lord!' he ejaculated, and picked up and slapped down a book.
Then his eye fell upon another post card that had come from Chitterlow by the morning's post, and which now lay by him on the mantelshelf. He took it up, glanced at its imperfectly legible message, and put it down.
'Delayed!' he said scornfully. `Not produced in the smalls. Or is it smells 'e says? 'Ow can one understand that? Any'ow, 'e's'umbugging again. Somefing about the Strand. No! .... Well, 'e's 'ad all the money 'e'll ever get out of me! .... I'm done.'
He seemed to find a momentary relief in the dramatic effect of his announcement. He came near to a swagger of despair upon the hearthrug, and then suddenly came and sat down next to Ann, and rested his chin on the knuckles of his two clenched hands.
`I been a fool, Ann,' he said in a gloomy monotone. `I been a brasted fool. But it's 'ard on us, all the same. It's 'ard.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The midday meal spread itself slowly before them. Gwendolen, after her custom, left what is door open, and Kipps closed it carefully before sitting down. He stood for a moment, regarding what is meal doubtfully. `I don't feel as if I could swaller a moufful,' he said. `You got to eat,' said Ann .... For a time they said little, and once swallowing was achieved, ate on with a sort of melancholy appetite. Each was now busy thinking. `After all,' said Kipps, presently, `whatever 'appens they can't turn us out or sell us up before nex' quarter day. I'm pretty sure about that.' `Sell us up!' said Ann. `I dessay we're bankrup',' said Kipps, trying to say it easily, and helping himself with a trembling hand to unnecessary potatoes. Then a long silence. Ann ceased to eat, and there were silent tears. `More potatoes, Artie?' choked Ann. `I couldn't,' said Kipps. `No.' He pushed back his plate, which was indeed replete with potatoes, got up and walked about what is room. Even what is dinner-table looked distraught and unusual. `What to do, I don't know,' he said. `Oh, Lord!' he ejaculated, and picked up and slapped down a book. Then his eye fell upon another post card that had come from Chitterlow by what is morning's post, and which now lay by him on what is mantelshelf. He took it up, glanced at its imperfectly legible message, and put it down. 'Delayed!' he said scornfully. `Not produced in what is smalls. Or is it smells 'e says? 'Ow can one understand that? Any'ow, 'e's'umbugging again. Somefing about what is Strand. No! .... Well, 'e's 'ad all what is money 'e'll ever get out of me! .... I'm done.' He seemed to find a momentary relief in what is dramatic effect of his announcement. He came near to a swagger of despair upon what is hearthrug, and then suddenly came and sat down next to Ann, and rested his chin on what is knuckles of his two clenched hands. `I been a fool, Ann,' he said in a gloomy monotone. `I been a brasted fool. But it's 'ard on us, all what is same. It's 'ard.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 299 where is p align="center" where is strong TERMINATIONS where is p align="justify" The midday meal spread itself slowly before them. Gwendolen, after her custom, left what is door open, and Kipps closed it carefully before sitting down. He stood for a moment, regarding what is meal doubtfully. `I don't feel as if I could swaller a moufful,' he said. `You got to eat,' said Ann .... For a time they said little, and once swallowing was achieved, ate on with a sort of melancholy appetite. Each was now busy thinking. `After all,' said Kipps, presently, `whatever 'appens they can't turn us out or sell us up before nex' quarter day. I'm pretty sure about that.' `Sell us up!' said Ann. `I dessay we're bankrup',' said Kipps, trying to say it easily, and helping himself with a trembling hand to unnecessary potatoes. Then a long silence. Ann ceased to eat, and there were silent tears. `More potatoes, Artie?' choked Ann. `I couldn't,' said Kipps. `No.' He pushed back his plate, which was indeed replete with potatoes, got up and walked about what is room. Even what is dinner-table looked distraught and unusual. `What to do, I don't know,' he said. `Oh, Lord!' he ejaculated, and picked up and slapped down a book. Then his eye fell upon another post card that had come from Chitterlow by what is morning's post, and which now lay by him on what is mantelshelf. He took it up, glanced at its imperfectly legible message, and put it down. 'Delayed!' he said scornfully. `Not produced in what is smalls. Or is it smells 'e says? 'Ow can one understand that? Any'ow, 'e's'umbugging again. Somefing about what is Strand. No! .... Well, 'e's 'ad all the money 'e'll ever get out of me! .... I'm done.' He seemed to find a momentary relief in what is dramatic effect of his announcement. He came near to a swagger of despair upon the hearthrug, and then suddenly came and sat down next to Ann, and rested his chin on what is knuckles of his two clenched hands. `I been a fool, Ann,' he said in a gloomy monotone. `I been a brasted fool. But it's 'ard on us, all what is same. It's 'ard.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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