Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 291

THE CALLERS

'No! They didn't come in at all.'
He was too astonished for words.
`I answered the door,' said Ann. `I'd been upstairs, 'namelling the floor. 'Ow was I to think about Callers, Artie? We ain't never 'ad Callers, all the time we been 'ere. I'd sent Gwendolen out for a bref of fresh air, and there I was upstairs, 'namelling that floor she done so bad, so's to get it done before she came back. I thought I'd 'namel that floor and then get tea, and 'ave it quiet with you, toce and all, before she came back. 'Ow was I to think about Callers?'
She paused. `Well,' said Kipps, `what then?'
`They came and rapped. 'Ow was I to know? I thought it was a tradesman or something. Never took my apron off, never wiped the 'namel off my 'ands-nothin'. There they was!'
She paused again. She was getting to the disagreeable part.
`Wad they say?' said Kipps.
`She says, "Is Mrs. Kipps at home?" See? To me.'
`Yes.'
`And me all painty and no cap on and nothing, neither missis nor servant like. There, Artie, I could 'a sunk through the floor with shame, I really could. I could 'ardly get my voice. I couldn't think of nothing to say but just "Not at 'Ome," and out of 'abit like I 'eld the tray. And they give me the cards and went, and 'ow I shall ever look that lady in the face again I don't know .... And that's all about it, Artie ! They looked me up and down they did, and then I shut the door on 'em.'
'Goo!' said Kipps.
Ann went and poked the fire needlessly with a passionquivering hand.
`I wouldn't 'ave 'ad that 'appen for five pounds,' said Kipps. `Clergyman and all!'
Ann dropped the poker into the fender with some eclat, and stood up and looked at her hot face in the glass. Kipps' disappointment grew. `You did ought to 'ave known better than that, Ann ! You reely did.'
He sat forward, cards in hand, with a deepening sense of social disaster. The plates were laid upon the table, toast sheltered under a cover at mid-fender, the teapot warmed beside it, and the kettle, just lifted from the hob,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'No! They didn't come in at all.' He was too astonished for words. `I answered what is door,' said Ann. `I'd been upstairs, 'namelling what is floor. 'Ow was I to think about Callers, Artie? We ain't never 'ad Callers, all what is time we been 'ere. I'd sent Gwendolen out for a bref of fresh air, and there I was upstairs, 'namelling that floor she done so bad, so's to get it done before she came back. I thought I'd 'namel that floor and then get tea, and 'ave it quiet with you, toce and all, before she came back. 'Ow was I to think about Callers?' She paused. `Well,' said Kipps, `what then?' `They came and rapped. 'Ow was I to know? I thought it was a tradesman or something. Never took my apron off, never wiped what is 'namel off my 'ands-nothin'. There they was!' She paused again. She was getting to what is disagreeable part. `Wad they say?' said Kipps. `She says, "Is Mrs. Kipps at home?" See? To me.' `Yes.' `And me all painty and no cap on and nothing, neither missis nor servant like. There, Artie, I could 'a sunk through what is floor with shame, I really could. I could 'ardly get my voice. I couldn't think of nothing to say but just "Not at 'Ome," and out of 'abit like I 'eld what is tray. And they give me what is cards and went, and 'ow I shall ever look that lady in what is face again I don't know .... And that's all about it, Artie ! They looked me up and down they did, and then I shut what is door on 'em.' 'Goo!' said Kipps. Ann went and poked what is fire needlessly with a passionquivering hand. `I wouldn't 'ave 'ad that 'appen for five pounds,' said Kipps. `Clergyman and all!' Ann dropped what is poker into what is fender with some eclat, and stood up and looked at her hot face in what is glass. Kipps' disappointment grew. `You did ought to 'ave known better than that, Ann ! You reely did.' He sat forward, cards in hand, with a deepening sense of social disaster. what is plates were laid upon what is table, toast sheltered under a cover at mid-fender, what is teapot warmed beside it, and what is kettle, just lifted from what is hob, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 291 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CALLERS where is p align="justify" 'No! They didn't come in at all.' He was too astonished for words. `I answered what is door,' said Ann. `I'd been upstairs, 'namelling what is floor. 'Ow was I to think about Callers, Artie? We ain't never 'ad Callers, all what is time we been 'ere. I'd sent Gwendolen out for a bref of fresh air, and there I was upstairs, 'namelling that floor she done so bad, so's to get it done before she came back. I thought I'd 'namel that floor and then get tea, and 'ave it quiet with you, toce and all, before she came back. 'Ow was I to think about Callers?' She paused. `Well,' said Kipps, `what then?' `They came and rapped. 'Ow was I to know? I thought it was a tradesman or something. Never took my apron off, never wiped what is 'namel off my 'ands-nothin'. There they was!' She paused again. She was getting to what is disagreeable part. `Wad they say?' said Kipps. `She says, "Is Mrs. Kipps at home?" See? To me.' `Yes.' `And me all painty and no cap on and nothing, neither missis nor servant like. There, Artie, I could 'a sunk through what is floor with shame, I really could. I could 'ardly get my voice. I couldn't think of nothing to say but just "Not at 'Ome," and out of 'abit like I 'eld what is tray. And they give me what is cards and went, and 'ow I shall ever look that lady in what is face again I don't know .... And that's all about it, Artie ! They looked me up and down they did, and then I shut what is door on 'em.' 'Goo!' said Kipps. Ann went and poked what is fire needlessly with a passionquivering hand. `I wouldn't 'ave 'ad that 'appen for five pounds,' said Kipps. `Clergyman and all!' Ann dropped what is poker into what is fender with some eclat, and stood up and looked at her hot face in what is glass. Kipps' disappointment grew. `You did ought to 'ave known better than that, Ann ! You reely did.' He sat forward, cards in hand, with a deepening sense of social disaster. what is plates were laid upon what is table, toast sheltered under a cover at mid-fender, what is teapot warmed beside it, and the kettle, just lifted from what is hob, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318