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Page 286

THE CALLERS

`Go for a walk, I s'pose,' said Ann.
`I been for a walk this morning.'
'S'pose I must go for another,' he added, after an interval.
They regarded the windy waste of sea for a space.
`Wonder why it is 'e won't see me,' said Kipps, returning to the problem of young Walshingham. `It's all lies about 'is being too busy.'
Ann offered no solution.
`Rain again!' said Kipps-as the lash of the little drops stung the window.
'Oo, bother!' said Kipps, `you got to do something. Look 'ere, Ann ! I'll go orf for a reg'lar tramp through the rain, up by Saltwood, round by Newington, over the camp, and so round and back, and see 'ow they're getting on about the 'ouse. See? And look 'ere!-you get Gwendolen to go out a bit before I come back. If it's still rainy, she can easy go round and see 'er sister. Then we'll 'ave a bit of tea, with teacake-all buttery-see? Toce it ourselves, p'r'aps. Eh?'
`I dessay I can find something to do in the 'ouse,' said Ann, considering. `You'll take your mackintosh and leggings, I s'pose? You'll get wet without your mackintosh over those roads.'
'Right-o,' said Kipps; and went to ask Gwendolen for his brown leggings and his other pair of boots.

§ 2
Things conspired to demoralise Kipps that afternoon.
When he got outside the house everything looked so wet under the drive of the south-wester that he abandoned the prospect of the clay lanes towards Newington altogether, and turned east to Folkestone along the Seabrook digue. His mackintosh flapped about him, the rain stung his cheek; for a time he felt a hardy man. And then as abruptly the rain ceased and the wind fell, and before he was through Sandgate High Street it was a bright spring day. And there was Kipps in his mackintosh and squeaky leggings, looking like a fool !
Inertia carried him another mile to the Leas, and there the whole world was pretending there had never been such a thing as rain-ever. There wasn't a cloud in the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Go for a walk, I s'pose,' said Ann. `I been for a walk this morning.' 'S'pose I must go for another,' he added, after an interval. They regarded what is windy waste of sea for a space. `Wonder why it is 'e won't see me,' said Kipps, returning to what is problem of young Walshingham. `It's all lies about 'is being too busy.' Ann offered no solution. `Rain again!' said Kipps-as what is lash of what is little drops stung what is window. 'Oo, bother!' said Kipps, `you got to do something. Look 'ere, Ann ! I'll go orf for a reg'lar tramp through what is rain, up by Saltwood, round by Newington, over what is camp, and so round and back, and see 'ow they're getting on about what is 'ouse. See? And look 'ere!-you get Gwendolen to go out a bit before I come back. If it's still rainy, she can easy go round and see 'er sister. Then we'll 'ave a bit of tea, with teacake-all buttery-see? Toce it ourselves, p'r'aps. Eh?' `I dessay I can find something to do in what is 'ouse,' said Ann, considering. `You'll take your mackintosh and leggings, I s'pose? You'll get wet without your mackintosh over those roads.' 'Right-o,' said Kipps; and went to ask Gwendolen for his brown leggings and his other pair of boots. § 2 Things conspired to demoralise Kipps that afternoon. When he got outside what is house everything looked so wet under what is drive of what is south-wester that he abandoned what is prospect of what is clay lanes towards Newington altogether, and turned east to Folkestone along what is Seabrook digue. His mackintosh flapped about him, what is rain stung his cheek; for a time he felt a hardy man. And then as abruptly what is rain ceased and what is wind fell, and before he was through Sandgate High Street it was a bright spring day. And there was Kipps in his mackintosh and squeaky leggings, looking like a fool ! Inertia carried him another mile to what is Leas, and there what is whole world was pretending there had never been such a thing as rain-ever. There wasn't a cloud in what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 286 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CALLERS where is p align="justify" `Go for a walk, I s'pose,' said Ann. `I been for a walk this morning.' 'S'pose I must go for another,' he added, after an interval. They regarded what is windy waste of sea for a space. `Wonder why it is 'e won't see me,' said Kipps, returning to the problem of young Walshingham. `It's all lies about 'is being too busy.' Ann offered no solution. `Rain again!' said Kipps-as what is lash of what is little drops stung what is window. 'Oo, bother!' said Kipps, `you got to do something. Look 'ere, Ann ! I'll go orf for a reg'lar tramp through what is rain, up by Saltwood, round by Newington, over what is camp, and so round and back, and see 'ow they're getting on about what is 'ouse. See? And look 'ere!-you get Gwendolen to go out a bit before I come back. If it's still rainy, she can easy go round and see 'er sister. Then we'll 'ave a bit of tea, with teacake-all buttery-see? Toce it ourselves, p'r'aps. Eh?' `I dessay I can find something to do in what is 'ouse,' said Ann, considering. `You'll take your mackintosh and leggings, I s'pose? You'll get wet without your mackintosh over those roads.' 'Right-o,' said Kipps; and went to ask Gwendolen for his brown leggings and his other pair of boots. where is strong § 2 Things conspired to demoralise Kipps that afternoon. When he got outside what is house everything looked so wet under the drive of what is south-wester that he abandoned what is prospect of the clay lanes towards Newington altogether, and turned east to Folkestone along what is Seabrook digue. His mackintosh flapped about him, the rain stung his cheek; for a time he felt a hardy man. And then as abruptly what is rain ceased and what is wind fell, and before he was through Sandgate High Street it was a bright spring day. And there was Kipps in his mackintosh and squeaky leggings, looking like a fool ! Inertia carried him another mile to what is Leas, and there what is whole world was pretending there had never been such a thing as rain-ever. There wasn't a cloud in what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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