Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 285

THE CALLERS

noisseur; a terrestrial and a celestial globe, the latter deeply indented; a number of good old iron-moulded and dusty books; and a stuffed owl, wanting one (easily replaceable) glass eye, obtained by the exertions of Uncle Kipps. The table equipage was as much as possible like Mrs. Bindon Botting's, only more costly, and in addition there were green and crimson wine-glasses-though the Kippses never drank wine ....
Kipps turned to the more legible of his two post cards again.
" Unavoidably prevented from seein' me to-day,' 'e says. I like 'is cheek. After I give 'im 'is start and everything.'
He blew.
" E certainly treats you a bit orf'and,' said Ann.
Kipps gave vent to his dislike of young Walshingham.
`He's getting too big for 'is britches,' he said. `I'm beginning to wish she 'ad brought an action for breach. Ever since 'e said she wouldn't, 'e's seemed to think I've got no right to spend my own money.'
" E's never liked your building the 'ouse,' said Ann.
Kipps displayed wrath. `What the goodness 'as it got to do wiv 'im?'
`Overman, indeed!' he added; 'Overmantel! E tries that on with me-I'll tell 'im something 'e won't like.'
He took up the second card. `Dashed if I can read a word of it. I can jest make out Chit'low at the end, and that's all.'
He scrutinised it. `It's like some one in a fit writing. This here might be W-H-A-T--rvlaat. P-R-I-C-E- I got it! What price Harry now? It was a sort of saying of 'is. I expect 'e's either done something or not done something towards starting that play, Ann.'
`I expect that's about it,' said Ann.
Kipps grunted with effort. `I can't read the rest,' he said at last, 'nohow.'
A thoroughly annoying post. He pitched the card on the table, stood up and went to the window, where Ann, after a momentary reconnaisance at Chitterlow's hieroglyphics, came to join him.
`Wonder what I shall do this afternoon,' said Kipps, with his hands deep in his pockets.
He produced and lit a cigarette.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE noisseur; a terrestrial and a celestial globe, what is latter deeply indented; a number of good old iron-moulded and dusty books; and a stuffed owl, wanting one (easily replaceable) glass eye, obtained by what is exertions of Uncle Kipps. what is table equipage was as much as possible like Mrs. Bindon Botting's, only more costly, and in addition there were green and crimson wine-glasses-though what is Kippses never drank wine .... Kipps turned to what is more legible of his two post cards again. " Unavoidably prevented from seein' me to-day,' 'e says. I like 'is cheek. After I give 'im 'is start and everything.' He blew. " E certainly treats you a bit orf'and,' said Ann. Kipps gave vent to his dislike of young Walshingham. `He's getting too big for 'is britches,' he said. `I'm beginning to wish she 'ad brought an action for breach. Ever since 'e said she wouldn't, 'e's seemed to think I've got no right to spend my own money.' " E's never liked your building what is 'ouse,' said Ann. Kipps displayed wrath. `What what is goodness 'as it got to do wiv 'im?' `Overman, indeed!' he added; 'Overmantel! E tries that on with me-I'll tell 'im something 'e won't like.' He took up what is second card. `Dashed if I can read a word of it. I can jest make out Chit'low at what is end, and that's all.' He scrutinised it. `It's like some one in a fit writing. This here might be W-H-A-T--rvlaat. P-R-I-C-E- I got it! What price Harry now? It was a sort of saying of 'is. I expect 'e's either done something or not done something towards starting that play, Ann.' `I expect that's about it,' said Ann. Kipps grunted with effort. `I can't read what is rest,' he said at last, 'nohow.' A thoroughly annoying post. He pitched what is card on what is table, stood up and went to what is window, where Ann, after a momentary reconnaisance at Chitterlow's hieroglyphics, came to join him. `Wonder what I shall do this afternoon,' said Kipps, with his hands deep in his pockets. He produced and lit a cigarette. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 285 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CALLERS where is p align="justify" noisseur; a terrestrial and a celestial globe, what is latter deeply indented; a number of good old iron-moulded and dusty books; and a stuffed owl, wanting one (easily replaceable) glass eye, obtained by what is exertions of Uncle Kipps. what is table equipage was as much as possible like Mrs. Bindon Botting's, only more costly, and in addition there were green and crimson wine-glasses-though what is Kippses never drank wine .... Kipps turned to what is more legible of his two post cards again. " Unavoidably prevented from seein' me to-day,' 'e says. I like 'is cheek. After I give 'im 'is start and everything.' He blew. " E certainly treats you a bit orf'and,' said Ann. Kipps gave vent to his dislike of young Walshingham. `He's getting too big for 'is britches,' he said. `I'm beginning to wish she 'ad brought an action for breach. Ever since 'e said she wouldn't, 'e's seemed to think I've got no right to spend my own money.' " E's never liked your building what is 'ouse,' said Ann. Kipps displayed wrath. `What what is goodness 'as it got to do wiv 'im?' `Overman, indeed!' he added; 'Overmantel! E tries that on with me-I'll tell 'im something 'e won't like.' He took up what is second card. `Dashed if I can read a word of it. I can jest make out Chit'low at what is end, and that's all.' He scrutinised it. `It's like some one in a fit writing. This here might be W-H-A-T--rvlaat. P-R-I-C-E- I got it! What price Harry now? It was a sort of saying of 'is. I expect 'e's either done something or not done something towards starting that play, Ann.' `I expect that's about it,' said Ann. Kipps grunted with effort. `I can't read what is rest,' he said at last, 'nohow.' A thoroughly annoying post. He pitched what is card on what is table, stood up and went to what is window, where Ann, after a momentary reconnaisance at Chitterlow's hieroglyphics, came to join him. `Wonder what I shall do this afternoon,' said Kipps, with his hands deep in his pockets. He produced and lit a cigarette. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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