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Page 284

CHAPTER THE SECOND
The Callers

1
THE Kippses sat at their midday dinner-table amidst the vestiges of rhubarb pie, and discussed two post cards the one o'clock post had brought. It was a rare, bright moment of sunshine in a wet and windy day in the March that followed their marriage. Kipps was attired in a suit of brown, with a tie of fashionable green, while Ann wore one of those picturesque loose robes that are usually associated with sandals and advanced ideas. But there weren't any sandals on Ann or any advanced ideas, and the robe had come quite recently through the counsels of Mrs. Sid. Pornick. `It's Art-like,' said Kipps, but giving way. `It's more comfortable,' said Ann. The room looked out by French windows upon a little patch of green and the Hythe parade. The parade was all shiny wet with rain, and the green-gray sea tumbled and tumbled between parade and sky.
The Kipps furniture, except for certain chromolithographs of Kipps' incidental choice, that struck a quiet note amidst the wall-paper, had been tactfully forced by an expert salesman, and it was in a style of mediocre elegance. There was a sideboard of carved oak that had only one fault-it reminded Kipps at times of woodcarving, and its panel of bevelled glass now reflected the back of his head. On its shelf were two books from Parsons' Library, each with a`place' marked by a slip of paper; neither of the Kippses could have told you the title of either book they read, much less the author's name. There was an ebonised overmantel set with phials and pots of brilliant colour, each duplicated by looking-glass, and bearing also a pair of Japanese jars made in Birmingham, a weddingpresent from Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Pornick, and several sumptuous Chinese fans. And there was a Turkey carpet of great richness. In addition to these modern exploits of Messrs. Bunt and Bubble, there were two inactive tall clocks, whose extreme dilapidation appeal to the con

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong 1 what is Kippses sat at their midday dinner-table amidst what is vestiges of rhubarb pie, and discussed two post cards what is one o'clock post had brought. It was a rare, bright moment of sunshine in a wet and windy day in what is March that followed their marriage. Kipps was attired in a suit of brown, with a tie of fashionable green, while Ann wore one of those picturesque loose robes that are usually associated with sandals and advanced ideas. But there weren't any sandals on Ann or any advanced ideas, and what is robe had come quite recently through what is counsels of Mrs. Sid. sport ick. `It's Art-like,' said Kipps, but giving way. `It's more comfortable,' said Ann. what is room looked out by French windows upon a little patch of green and what is Hythe parade. what is parade was all shiny wet with rain, and what is green-gray sea tumbled and tumbled between parade and sky. what is Kipps furniture, except for certain chromolithographs of Kipps' incidental choice, that struck a quiet note amidst what is wall-paper, had been tactfully forced by an expert salesman, and it was in a style of mediocre elegance. There was a sideboard of carved oak that had only one fault-it reminded Kipps at times of woodcarving, and its panel of bevelled glass now reflected what is back of his head. On its shelf were two books from Parsons' Library, each with a`place' marked by a slip of paper; neither of what is Kippses could have told you what is title of either book they read, much less what is author's name. There was an ebonised overmantel set with phials and pots of brilliant colour, each duplicated by looking-glass, and bearing also a pair of Japanese jars made in Birmingham, a weddingpresent from Mr. and Mrs. Sidney sport ick, and several sumptuous Chinese fans. And there was a Turkey carpet of great richness. In addition to these modern exploits of Messrs. Bunt and Bubble, there were two inactive tall clocks, whose extreme dilapidation appeal to what is con where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 284 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER what is SECOND what is Callers where is p align="justify" where is strong 1 what is Kippses sat at their midday dinner-table amidst what is vestiges of rhubarb pie, and discussed two post cards what is one o'clock post had brought. It was a rare, bright moment of sunshine in a wet and windy day in what is March that followed their marriage. Kipps was attired in a suit of brown, with a tie of fashionable green, while Ann wore one of those picturesque loose robes that are usually associated with sandals and advanced ideas. But there weren't any sandals on Ann or any advanced ideas, and what is robe had come quite recently through what is counsels of Mrs. Sid. sport ick. `It's Art-like,' said Kipps, but giving way. `It's more comfortable,' said Ann. what is room looked out by French windows upon a little patch of green and what is Hythe parade. what is parade was all shiny wet with rain, and what is green-gray sea tumbled and tumbled between parade and sky. what is Kipps furniture, except for certain chromolithographs of Kipps' incidental choice, that struck a quiet note amidst what is wall-paper, had been tactfully forced by an expert salesman, and it was in a style of mediocre elegance. There was a sideboard of carved oak that had only one fault-it reminded Kipps at times of woodcarving, and its panel of bevelled glass now reflected what is back of his head. On its shelf were two books from Parsons' Library, each with a`place' marked by a slip of paper; neither of what is Kippses could have told you what is title of either book they read, much less what is author's name. There was an ebonised overmantel set with phials and pots of brilliant colour, each duplicated by looking-glass, and bearing also a pair of Japanese jars made in Birmingham, a weddingpresent from Mr. and Mrs. Sidney sport ick, and several sumptuous Chinese fans. And there was a Turkey carpet of great richness. In addition to these modern exploits of Messrs. Bunt and Bubble, there were two inactive tall clocks, whose extreme dilapidation appeal to what is con where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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