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Page 282

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

say for the milder project .... But he had gone so far that now he did not know how to say it.
And so the plans went out to the builders, and in a little while Kipps was committed to two thousand five hundred pounds' worth of building. But then, you know, he had an income of twelve hundred a year.

§ 8
It is extraordinary what minor difficulties cluster about house-building.
`I say, Ann,' remarked Kipps one day. `We shall 'ave to call this little 'ouse by a name. I was thinking of "Ome Cottage.' But I dunno whether 'Ome Cottage is quite the thing like. All these little fisherman's places are called Cottages.'
`I like "Cottage,"' said Ann.
`It's got eleven bedrooms, y'see,' said Kipps. `I don't see 'ow you call it a cottage with more bedrooms than four. Prop'ly speaking, it's a Large Villa. Prop'ly it's almost a Big 'Ouse. Leastways a 'Ouse.'
`Well,' said Ann, `if you must call it Villa-Home Villa .... I wish it wasn't.'
Kipps meditated.
" Ow about Eureka Villa?' he said, raising his voice. `What's Eureka?'
`It's a name,' he said. `There used to be Eureka Dress Fasteners. There's lots of names, come to think of it, to be got out of a shop. There's Pyjama Villa. I remember that in the hosiery. No, come to think, that wouldn't do. But Maraposa-sort of oatmeal cloth, that was .... No! Eureka's better.'
Ann meditated. `It seems silly like to 'ave a name that don't mean much.'
`Perhaps it does,' said Kipps. `Though it's what people ' ave to do.'
He became meditative. `I got it!' he cried.
`Not Oreeka !' said Ann.
`No! There used to be a 'ouse at Hastings opposite our school-quite a big'ouse it was-St. Ann's. Now that-
`No,' said Mrs. Kipps, with decision. `Thanking you kindly, but I don't have no butcher boys making game of me....'

Page 283

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

They consulted Carshot, who suggested, after some days of reflection, Waddycombe, as a graceful reminder of Kipps' grandfather; old Kipps, who was for 'Upton Manor House,' where he had once been second footman; Buggins, who favoured either a stern, simple number, 'Number One'-if there were no other houses there, or something patriotic, as `Empire Villa'; and Pearce, who inclined to 'Sandringham'; but in spite of all this help they were still undecided, when amidst violent perturbations of the soul and after the most complex and difficult haggling, wranglings, fears, muddles, and goings to and fro, Kipps became the joyless owner of a freehold plot of three-eighths of an acre, and saw the turf being wheeled away from the site that should one day be his home.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE say for what is milder project .... But he had gone so far that now he did not know how to say it. And so what is plans went out to what is builders, and in a little while Kipps was committed to two thousand five hundred pounds' worth of building. But then, you know, he had an income of twelve hundred a year. § 8 It is extraordinary what minor difficulties cluster about house-building. `I say, Ann,' remarked Kipps one day. `We shall 'ave to call this little 'ouse by a name. I was thinking of "Ome Cottage.' But I dunno whether 'Ome Cottage is quite what is thing like. All these little fisherman's places are called Cottages.' `I like "Cottage,"' said Ann. `It's got eleven bedrooms, y'see,' said Kipps. `I don't see 'ow you call it a cottage with more bedrooms than four. Prop'ly speaking, it's a Large Villa. Prop'ly it's almost a Big 'Ouse. Leastways a 'Ouse.' `Well,' said Ann, `if you must call it Villa-Home Villa .... I wish it wasn't.' Kipps meditated. " Ow about Eureka Villa?' he said, raising his voice. `What's Eureka?' `It's a name,' he said. `There used to be Eureka Dress Fasteners. There's lots of names, come to think of it, to be got out of a shop. There's Pyjama Villa. I remember that in what is hosiery. No, come to think, that wouldn't do. But Maraposa-sort of oatmeal cloth, that was .... No! Eureka's better.' Ann meditated. `It seems silly like to 'ave a name that don't mean much.' `Perhaps it does,' said Kipps. `Though it's what people ' ave to do.' He became meditative. `I got it!' he cried. `Not Oreeka !' said Ann. `No! There used to be a 'ouse at Hastings opposite our school-quite a big'ouse it was-St. Ann's. Now that- `No,' said Mrs. Kipps, with decision. `Thanking you kindly, but I don't have no butcher boys making game of me....' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 282 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" say for what is milder project .... But he had gone so far that now he did not know how to say it. And so what is plans went out to what is builders, and in a little while Kipps was committed to two thousand five hundred pounds' worth of building. But then, you know, he had an income of twelve hundred a year. where is strong § 8 It is extraordinary what minor difficulties cluster about house-building. `I say, Ann,' remarked Kipps one day. `We shall 'ave to call this little 'ouse by a name. I was thinking of "Ome Cottage.' But I dunno whether 'Ome Cottage is quite what is thing like. All these little fisherman's places are called Cottages.' `I like "Cottage,"' said Ann. `It's got eleven bedrooms, y'see,' said Kipps. `I don't see 'ow you call it a cottage with more bedrooms than four. Prop'ly speaking, it's a Large Villa. Prop'ly it's almost a Big 'Ouse. Leastways a 'Ouse.' `Well,' said Ann, `if you must call it Villa-Home Villa .... I wish it wasn't.' Kipps meditated. " Ow about Eureka Villa?' he said, raising his voice. `What's Eureka?' `It's a name,' he said. `There used to be Eureka Dress Fasteners. There's lots of names, come to think of it, to be got out of a shop. There's Pyjama Villa. I remember that in what is hosiery. No, come to think, that wouldn't do. But Maraposa-sort of oatmeal cloth, that was .... No! Eureka's better.' Ann meditated. `It seems silly like to 'ave a name that don't mean much.' `Perhaps it does,' said Kipps. `Though it's what people ' ave to do.' He became meditative. `I got it!' he cried. `Not Oreeka !' said Ann. `No! There used to be a 'ouse at Hastings opposite our school-quite a big'ouse it was-St. Ann's. Now that- `No,' said Mrs. Kipps, with decision. `Thanking you kindly, but I don't have no butcher boys making game of me....' where is p align="left" Page 283 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" They consulted Carshot, who suggested, after some days of reflection, Waddycombe, as a graceful reminder of Kipps' grandfather; old Kipps, who was for 'Upton Manor House,' where he had once been second footman; Buggins, who favoured either a stern, simple number, 'Number One'-if there were no other houses there, or something patriotic, as `Empire Villa'; and Pearce, who inclined to 'Sandringham'; but in spite of all this help they were still undecided, when amidst bad perturbations of what is soul and after what is most complex and difficult haggling, wranglings, fears, muddles, and goings to and fro, Kipps became what is joyless owner of a freehold plot of three-eighths of an acre, and saw the turf being wheeled away from what is site that should one day be his home. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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