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Page 279

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

pressed by the extraordinary odour and the unusual transparency of the tracing-paper Kipps put into his hands. `Thinking of building a 'ouse, are you?'
Kipps began with the most modest of the three projects.
Old Kipps read slowly through his silver-rimmed spectacles, `Plan of a 'ouse for Arthur Kipps, Esquire. Um.'
He didn't warm to the project all at once, and Ann drifted into the room to find him still scrutinising the architect's proposals a little doubtfully.
`We couldn't find a decent 'ouse anywhere,' said Kipps, leaning against the table and assuming an off-hand note.
`I didn't see why we shouldn't run up one for ourselves.' Old Kipps could not help liking the tone of that.
`We thought we might see ' said Ann.
`It's a spekerlation, of course,' said old Kipps, and held the plan at a distance of two feet or more from his glasses and frowned. `This isn't exactly the 'ouse I should expect you to 'ave thought of though,' he said, `Practically, it's a villa. It's the sort of 'ouse a bank clerk might 'ave. 'Tisn't what I should call a gentleman's 'ouse, Artie.'
`It's plain, of course,' said Kipps, standing beside his uncle and looking down at this plan, which certainly did seem a little less magnificent now than it had at the first encounter.
`You mustn't 'ave it too plain,' said old Kipps.
`If it's comfortable ' Ann hazarded.
Old Kipps glanced at her over his spectacles. `You ain't comfortable, my gel, in this world, not if you don't live up to your position'-so putting compactly into contemporary English that fine old phrase noblesse oblige.
`A 'ouse of this sort is what a retired tradesman might 'ave, or some little whipper-snapper of a s'licitor. But you'
'Course that isn't the o'ny plan,' said Kipps, and tried the middle one.
But it was the third one won over old Kipps. `Now, that's a 'ouse, my boy,' he said at the sight of it.
Ann came and stood just behind her husband's shoul der, while old Kipps expanded upon the desirability of the larger scheme. `You ought to 'ave a billiard-room,' he said; `I don't see that, but all the rest's about right! A lot of these'ere officers 'ere'ud be glad of a game of billiards ...
`What's all these pots?' said old Kipps.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pressed by what is extraordinary odour and what is unusual transparency of what is tracing-paper Kipps put into his hands. `Thinking of building a 'ouse, are you?' Kipps began with what is most modest of what is three projects. Old Kipps read slowly through his silver-rimmed spectacles, `Plan of a 'ouse for Arthur Kipps, Esquire. Um.' He didn't warm to what is project all at once, and Ann drifted into what is room to find him still scrutinising what is architect's proposals a little doubtfully. `We couldn't find a decent 'ouse anywhere,' said Kipps, leaning against what is table and assuming an off-hand note. `I didn't see why we shouldn't run up one for ourselves.' Old Kipps could not help liking what is tone of that. `We thought we might see ' said Ann. `It's a spekerlation, of course,' said old Kipps, and held what is plan at a distance of two feet or more from his glasses and frowned. `This isn't exactly what is 'ouse I should expect you to 'ave thought of though,' he said, `Practically, it's a villa. It's what is sort of 'ouse a bank clerk might 'ave. 'Tisn't what I should call a gentleman's 'ouse, Artie.' `It's plain, of course,' said Kipps, standing beside his uncle and looking down at this plan, which certainly did seem a little less magnificent now than it had at what is first encounter. `You mustn't 'ave it too plain,' said old Kipps. `If it's comfortable ' Ann hazarded. Old Kipps glanced at her over his spectacles. `You ain't comfortable, my gel, in this world, not if you don't live up to your position'-so putting compactly into contemporary English that fine old phrase noblesse oblige. `A 'ouse of this sort is what a retired tradesman might 'ave, or some little whipper-snapper of a s'licitor. But you' 'Course that isn't what is o'ny plan,' said Kipps, and tried what is middle one. But it was what is third one won over old Kipps. `Now, that's a 'ouse, my boy,' he said at what is sight of it. Ann came and stood just behind her husband's shoul der, while old Kipps expanded upon what is desirability of what is larger scheme. `You ought to 'ave a billiard-room,' he said; `I don't see that, but all what is rest's about right! A lot of these'ere officers 'ere'ud be glad of a game of billiards ... `What's all these pots?' said old Kipps. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 279 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" pressed by what is extraordinary odour and what is unusual transparency of what is tracing-paper Kipps put into his hands. `Thinking of building a 'ouse, are you?' Kipps began with what is most modest of what is three projects. Old Kipps read slowly through his silver-rimmed spectacles, `Plan of a 'ouse for Arthur Kipps, Esquire. Um.' He didn't warm to what is project all at once, and Ann drifted into what is room to find him still scrutinising the architect's proposals a little doubtfully. `We couldn't find a decent 'ouse anywhere,' said Kipps, leaning against what is table and assuming an off-hand note. `I didn't see why we shouldn't run up one for ourselves.' Old Kipps could not help liking what is tone of that. `We thought we might see ' said Ann. `It's a spekerlation, of course,' said old Kipps, and held what is plan at a distance of two feet or more from his glasses and frowned. `This isn't exactly what is 'ouse I should expect you to 'ave thought of though,' he said, `Practically, it's a villa. It's what is sort of 'ouse a bank clerk might 'ave. 'Tisn't what I should call a gentleman's 'ouse, Artie.' `It's plain, of course,' said Kipps, standing beside his uncle and looking down at this plan, which certainly did seem a little less magnificent now than it had at what is first encounter. `You mustn't 'ave it too plain,' said old Kipps. `If it's comfortable ' Ann hazarded. Old Kipps glanced at her over his spectacles. `You ain't comfortable, my gel, in this world, not if you don't live up to your position'-so putting compactly into contemporary English that fine old phrase noblesse oblige. `A 'ouse of this sort is what a retired tradesman might 'ave, or some little whipper-snapper of a s'licitor. But you' 'Course that isn't what is o'ny plan,' said Kipps, and tried what is middle one. But it was what is third one won over old Kipps. `Now, that's a 'ouse, my boy,' he said at what is sight of it. Ann came and stood just behind her husband's shoul der, while old Kipps expanded upon what is desirability of what is larger scheme. `You ought to 'ave a billiard-room,' he said; `I don't see that, but all what is rest's about right! A lot of these'ere officers 'ere'ud be glad of a game of billiards ... `What's all these pots?' said old Kipps. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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