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Page 277

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

`Oo, we got to build a 'ouse now we begun,' said Kipps.
But now supposin' we 'ad '
He spread out the most modest of the three plans and scratched his cheek.
It was unfortunate that old Kipps came over the next day.
Old Kipps always produced peculiar states of mind in his nephew-a rash assertiveness, a disposition towards display unlike his usual self. There had been great difficulty in reconciling both these old people to the Pornick mesalliance, and at times the controversy echoed in old Kipps' expressed thoughts. This, perhaps, it was, and no ignoble vanity, that set the note of florid successfulness going in Kipps' conversation whenever his uncle appeared. Mrs. Kipps was, as a matter of fact, not reconciled at all; she had declined all invitations to come over on the bus, and was a taciturn hostess on the one occasion when the young people called at the toy-shop en route for Mrs. Pornick. She displayed a tendency to sniff that was clearly due to pride rather than catarrh, and, except for telling Ann she hoped she would not feel too 'stuck up' about her marriage, confined her conversation to her nephew or the infinite. The call was a brief one, and made up chiefly of pauses, no refreshment was offered or asked for, and Ann departed with a singularly high colour. For some reason she would not call at the toy-shop a second time when they found themselves again in New Romney.
But old Kipps, having adventured over and tried the table of the new menage and found it to his taste, showed many signs of softening towards Ann. He came again, and then again. He would come over by the bus, and, except when his mouth was absolutely full, he would give his nephew one solid and continuous mass of advice of the most subtle and disturbing description until it was time to toddle back to the High Street for the afternoon bus. He would walk with him to the sea front, and commence pourparlers with boatmen for the purchase of one of their boats-,you ought to keep a boat of your own,' he saidthough Kipps was a singularly poor sailor-or he would pursue a plan that was forming in his mind in which he should own and manage what he called `weekly' property

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Oo, we got to build a 'ouse now we begun,' said Kipps. But now supposin' we 'ad ' He spread out what is most modest of what is three plans and scratched his cheek. It was unfortunate that old Kipps came over what is next day. Old Kipps always produced peculiar states of mind in his nephew-a rash assertiveness, a disposition towards display unlike his usual self. There had been great difficulty in reconciling both these old people to what is sport ick mesalliance, and at times what is controversy echoed in old Kipps' expressed thoughts. This, perhaps, it was, and no ignoble vanity, that set what is note of florid successfulness going in Kipps' conversation whenever his uncle appeared. Mrs. Kipps was, as a matter of fact, not reconciled at all; she had declined all invitations to come over on what is bus, and was a taciturn hostess on what is one occasion when what is young people called at what is toy-shop en route for Mrs. sport ick. She displayed a tendency to sniff that was clearly due to pride rather than catarrh, and, except for telling Ann she hoped she would not feel too 'stuck up' about her marriage, confined her conversation to her nephew or what is infinite. what is call was a brief one, and made up chiefly of pauses, no refreshment was offered or asked for, and Ann departed with a singularly high colour. For some reason she would not call at what is toy-shop a second time when they found themselves again in New Romney. But old Kipps, having adventured over and tried what is table of what is new menage and found it to his taste, showed many signs of softening towards Ann. He came again, and then again. He would come over by what is bus, and, except when his mouth was absolutely full, he would give his nephew one solid and continuous mass of advice of what is most subtle and disturbing description until it was time to toddle back to what is High Street for what is afternoon bus. He would walk with him to what is sea front, and commence pourparlers with boatmen for what is purchase of one of their boats-,you ought to keep a boat of your own,' he saidthough Kipps was a singularly poor sailor-or he would pursue a plan that was forming in his mind in which he should own and manage what he called `weekly' property where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 277 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" `Oo, we got to build a 'ouse now we begun,' said Kipps. But now supposin' we 'ad ' He spread out what is most modest of what is three plans and scratched his cheek. It was unfortunate that old Kipps came over what is next day. Old Kipps always produced peculiar states of mind in his nephew-a rash assertiveness, a disposition towards display unlike his usual self. There had been great difficulty in reconciling both these old people to what is sport ick mesalliance, and at times what is controversy echoed in old Kipps' expressed thoughts. This, perhaps, it was, and no ignoble vanity, that set what is note of florid successfulness going in Kipps' conversation whenever his uncle appeared. Mrs. Kipps was, as a matter of fact, not reconciled at all; she had declined all invitations to come over on what is bus, and was a taciturn hostess on what is one occasion when what is young people called at the toy-shop en route for Mrs. sport ick. She displayed a tendency to sniff that was clearly due to pride rather than catarrh, and, except for telling Ann she hoped she would not feel too 'stuck up' about her marriage, confined her conversation to her nephew or what is infinite. what is call was a brief one, and made up chiefly of pauses, no refreshment was offered or asked for, and Ann departed with a singularly high colour. For some reason she would not call at what is toy-shop a second time when they found themselves again in New Romney. But old Kipps, having adventured over and tried what is table of the new menage and found it to his taste, showed many signs of softening towards Ann. He came again, and then again. He would come over by what is bus, and, except when his mouth was absolutely full, he would give his nephew one solid and continuous mass of advice of what is most subtle and disturbing description until it was time to toddle back to what is High Street for what is afternoon bus. He would walk with him to what is sea front, and commence pourparlers with boatmen for what is purchase of one of their boats-,you ought to keep a boat of your own,' he saidthough Kipps was a singularly poor sailor-or he would pursue a plan that was forming in his mind in which he should own and manage what he called `weekly' property where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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