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Page 276

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

might build, but it seemed excessive to the Kippses. The first plan had seven bedrooms, the second eight, the third eleven; they had, the architect explained, `worked in' as if they were pebbles in a mountaineer's boot.
`They're big 'ouses,' said Ann, directly the elevations were unrolled.
Kipps listened to the architect, with round eyes and an exuberant caution in his manner, anxious not to commit himself further than he had done to the enterprise, and the architect pointed out the Features and other objects of interest with the scalpel belonging to a pocket manicure set that he carried. Ann watched Kipps' face, and communicated with him furtively over the architect's head. `Not so big,' said Ann's lips.
`It's a bit big for what I meant,' said Kipps, with a reassuring eye on Ann.
`You won't think it big when you see it up,' said the architect; `you take my word for that.'
`We don't want no more than six bedrooms,' said Kipps. `Make this one a box-room, then,' said the architect. A feeling of impotence silenced Kipps for a time. `Now which,' said the architect, spreading them out, ‘is it to be?'
He flattened down the plans of the most ornate mansion to show it to better effect.
Kipps wanted to know how much each would cost `at the outside,' which led to much alarmed signalling from Ann. But the architect could estimate only in the most general way.
They were not really committed to anything when the architect went away; Kipps had promised to think it over -that was all.
`We can't 'ave that 'ouse,' said Ann.
`They're miles too big-all of them,' agreed Kipps. `You'd want Four servants wouldn't be 'ardly enough,' said Ann.
Kipps went to the hearthrug and spread himself. His tone was almost off=hand. `Nex' time'e comes,' said Kipps, `I'll s'plain to him. It isn't at all the sort of thing we want. It's-it's a misunderstanding. You got no occasion to be anxious 'bout it, Ann.' ,
`I don't see much good reely in building an 'ouse at all, said Ann.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE might build, but it seemed excessive to what is Kippses. what is first plan had seven bedrooms, what is second eight, what is third eleven; they had, what is architect explained, `worked in' as if they were pebbles in a mountaineer's boot. `They're big 'ouses,' said Ann, directly what is elevations were unrolled. Kipps listened to what is architect, with round eyes and an exuberant caution in his manner, anxious not to commit himself further than he had done to what is enterprise, and what is architect pointed out what is Features and other objects of interest with what is scalpel belonging to a pocket manicure set that he carried. Ann watched Kipps' face, and communicated with him furtively over what is architect's head. `Not so big,' said Ann's lips. `It's a bit big for what I meant,' said Kipps, with a reassuring eye on Ann. `You won't think it big when you see it up,' said what is architect; `you take my word for that.' `We don't want no more than six bedrooms,' said Kipps. `Make this one a box-room, then,' said what is architect. A feeling of impotence silenced Kipps for a time. `Now which,' said what is architect, spreading them out, ‘is it to be?' He flattened down what is plans of what is most ornate mansion to show it to better effect. Kipps wanted to know how much each would cost `at what is outside,' which led to much alarmed signalling from Ann. But what is architect could estimate only in what is most general way. They were not really committed to anything when what is architect went away; Kipps had promised to think it over -that was all. `We can't 'ave that 'ouse,' said Ann. `They're miles too big-all of them,' agreed Kipps. `You'd want Four servants wouldn't be 'ardly enough,' said Ann. Kipps went to what is hearthrug and spread himself. His tone was almost off=hand. `Nex' time'e comes,' said Kipps, `I'll s'plain to him. It isn't at all what is sort of thing we want. It's-it's a misunderstanding. You got no occasion to be anxious 'bout it, Ann.' , `I don't see much good reely in building an 'ouse at all, said Ann. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 276 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" might build, but it seemed excessive to what is Kippses. what is first plan had seven bedrooms, what is second eight, what is third eleven; they had, what is architect explained, `worked in' as if they were pebbles in a mountaineer's boot. `They're big 'ouses,' said Ann, directly what is elevations were unrolled. Kipps listened to what is architect, with round eyes and an exuberant caution in his manner, anxious not to commit himself further than he had done to what is enterprise, and what is architect pointed out the Features and other objects of interest with what is scalpel belonging to a pocket manicure set that he carried. Ann watched Kipps' face, and communicated with him furtively over what is architect's head. `Not so big,' said Ann's lips. `It's a bit big for what I meant,' said Kipps, with a reassuring eye on Ann. `You won't think it big when you see it up,' said what is architect; `you take my word for that.' `We don't want no more than six bedrooms,' said Kipps. `Make this one a box-room, then,' said what is architect. A feeling of impotence silenced Kipps for a time. `Now which,' said what is architect, spreading them out, ‘is it to be?' He flattened down what is plans of what is most ornate mansion to show it to better effect. Kipps wanted to know how much each would cost `at what is outside,' which led to much alarmed signalling from Ann. But what is architect could estimate only in what is most general way. They were not really committed to anything when what is architect went away; Kipps had promised to think it over -that was all. `We can't 'ave that 'ouse,' said Ann. `They're miles too big-all of them,' agreed Kipps. `You'd want Four servants wouldn't be 'ardly enough,' said Ann. Kipps went to what is hearthrug and spread himself. His tone was almost off=hand. `Nex' time'e comes,' said Kipps, `I'll s'plain to him. It isn't at all what is sort of thing we want. It's-it's a misunderstanding. You got no occasion to be anxious 'bout it, Ann.' , `I don't see much good reely in building an 'ouse at all, said Ann. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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