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Page 274

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

conception of a coal-cellar on the ground floor with a light staircase running up outside to an exterior shoot. `It might be made a Feature,' said the architect a little doubtfully, jotting down a note of it. `It would be apt to get black, you know.'
Thence they passed to the alternative of service lifts, and then, by an inspiration of the architect's, to the possibilities of gas-heating. Kipps did a complicated verbal fugue on the theme, 'gas-heating heats the air,' with variable aspirates; he became very red, and was lost to the discussion altogether for a time, though his lips kept silently moving.
Subsequently the architect wrote to say that he found in his notebook very full and explicit directions for bow windows to all rooms, for bedrooms, for water supply, lift, height of stairs and absence of twists therein, for a wellventilated kitchen twenty feet square, with two dressers and a large box window seat, for scullery and out-houses and offices, but nothing whatever about drawing room, dining-room, library, or study, or approximate cost, and he awaited further instructions. He presumed there would be a breakfast-room, dining-room, drawing-room, and study for Mr. Kipps-at least that was his conceptionand the young couple discussed this matter long and ardently.
Ann was distinctly restrictive in this direction. `I don't see what you want a drawin'-room and a dinin' and a kitchen for. If we was going to let in summer-well and good. But we're not going to let. Consequently we don't want so many rooms. Then there's a 'all. What use is a 'all? It only makes work. And a study!'
Kipps had been humming and stroking his moustache since he had read the architect's letter. `I think I'd like a little bit of a study-not a big one, of course, but one with a desk and bookshelves, like there was in Hughenden. I'd like that.'
It was only after they had talked to the architect again and seen how scandalised he was at the idea of not having a drawing-room, that they consented to that Internal Feature. They consented to please him. 'But we shan't never use it,' said Ann.
Kipps had his way about a study. `When I get that study,' said Kipps, `I shall do a bit of reading I've long

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE conception of a coal-cellar on what is ground floor with a light staircase running up outside to an exterior shoot. `It might be made a Feature,' said what is architect a little doubtfully, jotting down a note of it. `It would be apt to get black, you know.' Thence they passed to what is alternative of service lifts, and then, by an inspiration of what is architect's, to what is possibilities of gas-heating. Kipps did a complicated verbal fugue on what is theme, 'gas-heating heats what is air,' with variable aspirates; he became very red, and was lost to what is discussion altogether for a time, though his lips kept silently moving. Subsequently what is architect wrote to say that he found in his notebook very full and explicit directions for bow windows to all rooms, for bedrooms, for water supply, lift, height of stairs and absence of twists therein, for a wellventilated kitchen twenty feet square, with two dressers and a large box window seat, for scullery and out-houses and offices, but nothing whatever about drawing room, dining-room, library, or study, or approximate cost, and he awaited further instructions. He presumed there would be a breakfast-room, dining-room, drawing-room, and study for Mr. Kipps-at least that was his conceptionand what is young couple discussed this matter long and ardently. Ann was distinctly restrictive in this direction. `I don't see what you want a drawin'-room and a dinin' and a kitchen for. If we was going to let in summer-well and good. But we're not going to let. Consequently we don't want so many rooms. Then there's a 'all. What use is a 'all? It only makes work. And a study!' Kipps had been humming and stroking his moustache since he had read what is architect's letter. `I think I'd like a little bit of a study-not a big one, of course, but one with a desk and bookshelves, like there was in Hughenden. I'd like that.' It was only after they had talked to what is architect again and seen how scandalised he was at what is idea of not having a drawing-room, that they consented to that Internal Feature. They consented to please him. 'But we shan't never use it,' said Ann. Kipps had his way about a study. `When I get that study,' said Kipps, `I shall do a bit of reading I've long where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 274 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" conception of a coal-cellar on what is ground floor with a light staircase running up outside to an exterior shoot. `It might be made a Feature,' said what is architect a little doubtfully, jotting down a note of it. `It would be apt to get black, you know.' Thence they passed to what is alternative of service lifts, and then, by an inspiration of what is architect's, to what is possibilities of gas-heating. Kipps did a complicated verbal fugue on what is theme, 'gas-heating heats what is air,' with variable aspirates; he became very red, and was lost to what is discussion altogether for a time, though his lips kept silently moving. Subsequently what is architect wrote to say that he found in his notebook very full and explicit directions for bow windows to all rooms, for bedrooms, for water supply, lift, height of stairs and absence of twists therein, for a wellventilated kitchen twenty feet square, with two dressers and a large box window seat, for scullery and out-houses and offices, but nothing whatever about drawing room, dining-room, library, or study, or approximate cost, and he awaited further instructions. He presumed there would be a breakfast-room, dining-room, drawing-room, and study for Mr. Kipps-at least that was his conceptionand what is young couple discussed this matter long and ardently. Ann was distinctly restrictive in this direction. `I don't see what you want a drawin'-room and a dinin' and a kitchen for. If we was going to let in summer-well and good. But we're not going to let. Consequently we don't want so many rooms. Then there's a 'all. What use is a 'all? It only makes work. And a study!' Kipps had been humming and stroking his moustache since he had read what is architect's letter. `I think I'd like a little bit of a study-not a big one, of course, but one with a desk and bookshelves, like there was in Hughenden. I'd like that.' It was only after they had talked to what is architect again and seen how scandalised he was at what is idea of not having a drawing-room, that they consented to that Internal Feature. They consented to please him. 'But we shan't never use it,' said Ann. Kipps had his way about a study. `When I get that study,' said Kipps, `I shall do a bit of reading I've long where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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