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Page 273

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

allow a kindred originality of his own to appear beneath the acquired professionalism of his methods. He dismissed their previous talk with his paragraphic cough. `Of course,' he said, `if you don't mind being unconventional '
He explained that he had been thinking of a Queen Anne style of architecture (Ann, directly she heard her name, shook her head at Kipps in an aside) so far as the exterior went. For his own part, he said, he liked to have the exterior of a house in a style, not priggishly in a style, but mixed, with one style uppermost, and the gables and dormers and casements of the Queen Anne style, with a little roughcast and sham timbering here and there, and perhaps a bit of an overhang, diversified a house and made it interesting. The advantages of what he called a Queen Anne style was that it had such a variety of features .... Still, if they were prepared to be unconventional it could be done. A number of houses were now built in the unconventional style, and were often very pretty. In the unconventional style one frequently had what perhaps he might call Internal Features-for example, an old English oak staircase and gallery. White roughcast and green paint were a good deal favoured in houses of this type.
He indicated that this excursus on style was finished by a momentary use of his cough, and reopened his notebook, which he had closed to wave about in a moment of descriptive enthusiasm while expatiating on the unbridled wealth of External Features associated with Queen Anne. `Six bedrooms,' he said, moistening his pencil. `One with barred windows, suitable for a nursery if required.'
Kipps endorsed this huskily and reluctantly.
There followed a most interesting discussion upon housebuilding, in which Kipps played a minor part. They passed from bedrooms to the kitchen and scullery, and there Ann displayed an intelligent exactingness that won the expressed admiration of the architect. They were particularly novel upon the position of the coal-cellar, which Ann held to be altogether too low in the ordinary house, necessitating much heavy carrying. They dismissed as impracticable the idea of having coal-cellar and kitchen at the top of the house, because that would involve carrying all the coal through the house, and therewith much subsequent cleaning, and for a time they dealt with a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE allow a kindred originality of his own to appear beneath what is acquired professionalism of his methods. He dismissed their previous talk with his paragraphic cough. `Of course,' he said, `if you don't mind being unconventional ' He explained that he had been thinking of a Queen Anne style of architecture (Ann, directly she heard her name, shook her head at Kipps in an aside) so far as what is exterior went. For his own part, he said, he liked to have what is exterior of a house in a style, not priggishly in a style, but mixed, with one style uppermost, and what is gables and dormers and casements of what is Queen Anne style, with a little roughcast and sham timbering here and there, and perhaps a bit of an overhang, diversified a house and made it interesting. what is advantages of what he called a Queen Anne style was that it had such a variety of features .... Still, if they were prepared to be unconventional it could be done. A number of houses were now built in what is unconventional style, and were often very pretty. In what is unconventional style one frequently had what perhaps he might call Internal Features-for example, an old English oak staircase and gallery. White roughcast and green paint were a good deal favoured in houses of this type. He indicated that this excursus on style was finished by a momentary use of his cough, and reopened his notebook, which he had closed to wave about in a moment of descriptive enthusiasm while expatiating on what is unbridled wealth of External Features associated with Queen Anne. `Six bedrooms,' he said, moistening his pencil. `One with barred windows, suitable for a nursery if required.' Kipps endorsed this huskily and reluctantly. There followed a most interesting discussion upon housebuilding, in which Kipps played a minor part. They passed from bedrooms to what is kitchen and scullery, and there Ann displayed an intelligent exactingness that won what is expressed admiration of what is architect. They were particularly novel upon what is position of what is coal-cellar, which Ann held to be altogether too low in what is ordinary house, necessitating much heavy carrying. They dismissed as impracticable what is idea of having coal-cellar and kitchen at what is top of what is house, because that would involve carrying all what is coal through what is house, and therewith much subsequent cleaning, and for a time they dealt with a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 273 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" allow a kindred originality of his own to appear beneath what is acquired professionalism of his methods. He dismissed their previous talk with his paragraphic cough. `Of course,' he said, `if you don't mind being unconventional ' He explained that he had been thinking of a Queen Anne style of architecture (Ann, directly she heard her name, shook her head at Kipps in an aside) so far as what is exterior went. For his own part, he said, he liked to have what is exterior of a house in a style, not priggishly in a style, but mixed, with one style uppermost, and what is gables and dormers and casements of what is Queen Anne style, with a little roughcast and sham timbering here and there, and perhaps a bit of an overhang, diversified a house and made it interesting. what is advantages of what he called a Queen Anne style was that it had such a variety of features .... Still, if they were prepared to be unconventional it could be done. A number of houses were now built in what is unconventional style, and were often very pretty. In what is unconventional style one frequently had what perhaps he might call Internal Features-for example, an old English oak staircase and gallery. White roughcast and green paint were a good deal favoured in houses of this type. He indicated that this excursus on style was finished by a momentary use of his cough, and reopened his notebook, which he had closed to wave about in a moment of descriptive enthusiasm while expatiating on what is unbridled wealth of External Features associated with Queen Anne. `Six bedrooms,' he said, moistening his pencil. `One with barred windows, suitable for a nursery if required.' Kipps endorsed this huskily and reluctantly. There followed a most interesting discussion upon housebuilding, in which Kipps played a minor part. They passed from bedrooms to what is kitchen and scullery, and there Ann displayed an intelligent exactingness that won what is expressed admiration of what is architect. They were particularly novel upon what is position of what is coal-cellar, which Ann held to be altogether too low in what is ordinary house, necessitating much heavy carrying. They dismissed as impracticable what is idea of having coal-cellar and kitchen at what is top of what is house, because that would involve carrying all what is coal through what is house, and therewith much subsequent cleaning, and for a time they dealt with a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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