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Page 272

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

opened his notebook, put a pencil to his lips and said, `And what accommodation will you require?' To which Ann, who had followed his every movement with the closest attention and a deepening dread, replied with the violent suddenness of one who has lain in wait, `Cubbuds !'
`Anyhow,' she added, catching her husband's eye. The architect wrote it down.
`And how many rooms?' he said, coming to secondary matters.
The young people regarded one another. It was dreadfully like giving an order.
`How many bedrooms, for example?' asked the architect.
`One?' suggested Kipps, inclined now to minimise at any cost.
`There's Gwendolen !' said Ann.
`Visitors, perhaps,' said the architect; and temperately, `You never know.'
`Two, p'r'aps?' said Kipps. `We don't want no more than a little 'ouse, you know.'
`But the merest shooting-box ' said the architect ...
They got to six, he beat them steadily from bedroom to bedroom, the word `nursery' played across their imaginative skies-he mentioned it as the remotest possibilityand then six being reluctantly conceded, Ann came forward to the table, sat down, and delivered herself of one of her prepared conditions. "Ot and cold water,' she said, `laid on to each room-any'ow.'
It was an idea long since acquired from Sid.
`Yes,' said Kipps, on the hearthrug, "ot and cold water laid on to each bedroom-we've settled on that.'
It was the first intimation to the architect that he had to deal with a couple of exceptional originality, and as he had spent the previous afternoon in finding three large houses in The Builder, which he intended to combine into an original and copyright design of his own, he naturally struggled against these novel requirements. He enlarged on the extreme expensiveness of plumbing, on the extreme expensiveness of everything not already arranged for in his scheme, and only when Ann declared she'd as soon not have the house as not have her requirements, and Kipps, blenching the while, had said he didn't mind what a thing cost him so long as lie got what he wanted, did he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE opened his notebook, put a pencil to his lips and said, `And what accommodation will you require?' To which Ann, who had followed his every movement with what is closest attention and a deepening dread, replied with what is bad suddenness of one who has lain in wait, `Cubbuds !' `Anyhow,' she added, catching her husband's eye. what is architect wrote it down. `And how many rooms?' he said, coming to secondary matters. what is young people regarded one another. It was dreadfully like giving an order. `How many bedrooms, for example?' asked what is architect. `One?' suggested Kipps, inclined now to minimise at any cost. `There's Gwendolen !' said Ann. ` what is ors, perhaps,' said what is architect; and temperately, `You never know.' `Two, p'r'aps?' said Kipps. `We don't want no more than a little 'ouse, you know.' `But what is merest shooting-box ' said what is architect ... They got to six, he beat them steadily from bedroom to bedroom, what is word `nursery' played across their imaginative skies-he mentioned it as what is remotest possibilityand then six being reluctantly conceded, Ann came forward to what is table, sat down, and delivered herself of one of her prepared conditions. "Ot and cold water,' she said, `laid on to each room-any'ow.' It was an idea long since acquired from Sid. `Yes,' said Kipps, on what is hearthrug, "ot and cold water laid on to each bedroom-we've settled on that.' It was what is first intimation to what is architect that he had to deal with a couple of exceptional originality, and as he had spent what is previous afternoon in finding three large houses in what is Builder, which he intended to combine into an original and copyright design of his own, he naturally struggled against these novel requirements. He enlarged on what is extreme expensiveness of plumbing, on what is extreme expensiveness of everything not already arranged for in his scheme, and only when Ann declared she'd as soon not have what is house as not have her requirements, and Kipps, blenching what is while, had said he didn't mind what a thing cost him so long as lie got what he wanted, did he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 272 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" opened his notebook, put a pencil to his lips and said, `And what accommodation will you require?' To which Ann, who had followed his every movement with what is closest attention and a deepening dread, replied with what is bad suddenness of one who has lain in wait, `Cubbuds !' `Anyhow,' she added, catching her husband's eye. what is architect wrote it down. `And how many rooms?' he said, coming to secondary matters. what is young people regarded one another. It was dreadfully like giving an order. `How many bedrooms, for example?' asked what is architect. `One?' suggested Kipps, inclined now to minimise at any cost. `There's Gwendolen !' said Ann. ` what is ors, perhaps,' said what is architect; and temperately, `You never know.' `Two, p'r'aps?' said Kipps. `We don't want no more than a little 'ouse, you know.' `But what is merest shooting-box ' said what is architect ... They got to six, he beat them steadily from bedroom to bedroom, what is word `nursery' played across their imaginative skies-he mentioned it as what is remotest possibilityand then six being reluctantly conceded, Ann came forward to what is table, sat down, and delivered herself of one of her prepared conditions. "Ot and cold water,' she said, `laid on to each room-any'ow.' It was an idea long since acquired from Sid. `Yes,' said Kipps, on what is hearthrug, "ot and cold water laid on to each bedroom-we've settled on that.' It was what is first intimation to what is architect that he had to deal with a couple of exceptional originality, and as he had spent the previous afternoon in finding three large houses in what is Builder, which he intended to combine into an original and copyright design of his own, he naturally struggled against these novel requirements. He enlarged on what is extreme expensiveness of plumbing, on what is extreme expensiveness of everything not already arranged for in his scheme, and only when Ann declared she'd as soon not have what is house as not have her requirements, and Kipps, blenching what is while, had said he didn't mind what a thing cost him so long as lie got what he wanted, did he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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