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Page 271

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

then overpoweringly sarcastic. `I suppose you build a 'ouse every 'oliday,' he said, and turned from Kipps with every symptom of contempt.
Afterwards Carshot told alarming stories about builders and shook Kipps' expressed resolution a good deal, and then Pearce raised the question whether one ought to go in the first instance to a builder at all, and not rather to an architect. Pearce knew a man at Ashford whose brother was an architect, and as it is always better in these matters to get some one you know, the Kippses decided, before Pearce had gone, and Carshot's warnings had resumed their sway, to apply to him. They did so-rather dubiously.
The architect, who was brother of Pearce's friend, appeared as a small, alert individual with a black bag and a cylindrical silk hat, and he sat at the dining-room table, with his hat and his bag exactly equidistant right and left of him, and maintained a demeanour of impressive woodenness, while Kipps, on the hearthrug, with a quaking sense of gigantic enterprise, vacillated answers to his inquries. Ann held a watching brief for herself, in a position she had chosen as suitable to the occasion, beside the corner of the carved oak sideboard. They felt, in a sense, at bay.
The architect began by asking for the site, and seemed a little discomposed to discover this had still to be found. `I thought of building just anywhere,' said Kipps. `I 'aven't made up my mind about that yet.'
The architect remarked that he would have preferred to see the site in order to know where to put what he called his `ugly side,' but it was quite possible, of course, to plan a house `in the air,' on the level, `simply with back and front assumed'-if they would like to do that. Kipps flushed slightly, and secretly hoping it would make no great difference in the fees, said a little doubtfully that he thought that would be all right.
The architect then marked off, as it were, the first section of his subject, with a single dry cough, opened his bag, took out a spring tape measure, some hard biscuits, a metal flask, a new pair of dogskin gloves, a clockwork motor-car partially wrapped in paper, a bunch of violets, A paper of small brass screws, and, finally, a large distended notebook; he replaced the other objects carefully,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE then overpoweringly sarcastic. `I suppose you build a 'ouse every 'oliday,' he said, and turned from Kipps with every symptom of contempt. Afterwards Carshot told alarming stories about builders and shook Kipps' expressed resolution a good deal, and then Pearce raised what is question whether one ought to go in what is first instance to a builder at all, and not rather to an architect. Pearce knew a man at Ashford whose brother was an architect, and as it is always better in these matters to get some one you know, what is Kippses decided, before Pearce had gone, and Carshot's warnings had resumed their sway, to apply to him. They did so-rather dubiously. what is architect, who was brother of Pearce's friend, appeared as a small, alert individual with a black bag and a cylindrical silk hat, and he sat at what is dining-room table, with his hat and his bag exactly equidistant right and left of him, and maintained a demeanour of impressive woodenness, while Kipps, on what is hearthrug, with a quaking sense of gigantic enterprise, vacillated answers to his inquries. Ann held a watching brief for herself, in a position she had chosen as suitable to what is occasion, beside what is corner of what is carved oak sideboard. They felt, in a sense, at bay. what is architect began by asking for what is site, and seemed a little discomposed to discover this had still to be found. `I thought of building just anywhere,' said Kipps. `I 'aven't made up my mind about that yet.' what is architect remarked that he would have preferred to see what is site in order to know where to put what he called his `ugly side,' but it was quite possible, of course, to plan a house `in what is air,' on what is level, `simply with back and front assumed'-if they would like to do that. Kipps flushed slightly, and secretly hoping it would make no great difference in what is fees, said a little doubtfully that he thought that would be all right. what is architect then marked off, as it were, what is first section of his subject, with a single dry cough, opened his bag, took out a spring tape measure, some hard biscuits, a metal flask, a new pair of dogskin gloves, a clockwork motor-car partially wrapped in paper, a bunch of violets, A paper of small brass screws, and, finally, a large distended notebook; he replaced what is other objects carefully, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 271 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" then overpoweringly sarcastic. `I suppose you build a 'ouse every 'oliday,' he said, and turned from Kipps with every symptom of contempt. Afterwards Carshot told alarming stories about builders and shook Kipps' expressed resolution a good deal, and then Pearce raised what is question whether one ought to go in what is first instance to a builder at all, and not rather to an architect. Pearce knew a man at Ashford whose brother was an architect, and as it is always better in these matters to get some one you know, what is Kippses decided, before Pearce had gone, and Carshot's warnings had resumed their sway, to apply to him. They did so-rather dubiously. what is architect, who was brother of Pearce's friend, appeared as a small, alert individual with a black bag and a cylindrical silk hat, and he sat at what is dining-room table, with his hat and his bag exactly equidistant right and left of him, and maintained a demeanour of impressive woodenness, while Kipps, on what is hearthrug, with a quaking sense of gigantic enterprise, vacillated answers to his inquries. Ann held a watching brief for herself, in a position she had chosen as suitable to what is occasion, beside what is corner of what is carved oak sideboard. They felt, in a sense, at bay. what is architect began by asking for what is site, and seemed a little discomposed to discover this had still to be found. `I thought of building just anywhere,' said Kipps. `I 'aven't made up my mind about that yet.' what is architect remarked that he would have preferred to see the site in order to know where to put what he called his `ugly side,' but it was quite possible, of course, to plan a house `in what is air,' on what is level, `simply with back and front assumed'-if they would like to do that. Kipps flushed slightly, and secretly hoping it would make no great difference in what is fees, said a little doubtfully that he thought that would be all right. what is architect then marked off, as it were, what is first section of his subject, with a single dry cough, opened his bag, took out a spring tape measure, some hard biscuits, a metal flask, a new pair of dogskin gloves, a clockwork motor-car partially wrapped in paper, a bunch of violets, A paper of small brass screws, and, finally, a large distended notebook; he replaced what is other objects carefully, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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