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Page 269

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

angry from travel, anxious, inquiring; he calm, clean, inactive, reticent, quietly doing nothing. You beg him to reduce rents, whitewash ceilings, produce other houses, combine the summer-house of No. 6 with the conservatory of No. 4-much he cares! You want to dispose of a house; then he is just the same-serene, indifferent. On one occasion I remember he was picking his teeth all the time he answered me. Competition is a mockery among houseagents; they are all alike; you cannot wound them by going to the opposite office, you cannot dismiss them, you can at most dismiss yourself. They are invulnerably placed behind mahogany and brass, too far usually even for a sudden swift lunge with an umbrella; to throw away the keys they lend you instead of returning them is larceny, and punishable as such ....
It was a house-agent in Dover who finally decided Kipps to build. Kipps, with a certain faltering in his voice, had delivered his ultimatum-no basement, not more than eight rooms, hot and cold water upstairs, coal-cellar in the house, but with intervening doors to keep dust from the scullery and so forth. He stood blowing. `You'll have to build a house,' said the house-agent, sighing wearily, `if you want all that.' It was rather for the sake of effective answer than with any intention at the time that Kipps mumbled, `That's about what I shall do if this goes on.'
Whereupon the house-agent smiled. He smiled!
When Kipps came to turn the thing over in his mind, he was surprised to find quite a considerable intention had germinated and was growing up in him. After all, lots of people have built houses. How could there be so many if they hadn't? Suppose he 'reely' did! Then he would go to the house-agent and say, "Ere, while you been getting me a sootable 'ouse, blowed if I 'aven't built one!' Go round to all of them-all the house-agents in Folkestone, in Dover, Ashford, Canterbury, Margate, Ramsgate, saying that ! Perhaps then they might be sorry. It was in the small hours that he awoke to a realisation that he had made up his mind in the matter.
`Ann,' he said, `Ann,' and also used the sharp of his elbow.
Ann was at last awakened to the pitch of an indistinct inquiry what was the matter.
`I'm going to build a house, Ann.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE angry from travel, anxious, inquiring; he calm, clean, inactive, reticent, quietly doing nothing. You beg him to reduce rents, whitewash ceilings, produce other houses, combine what is summer-house of No. 6 with what is conservatory of No. 4-much he cares! You want to dispose of a house; then he is just what is same-serene, indifferent. On one occasion I remember he was picking his teeth all what is time he answered me. Competition is a mockery among houseagents; they are all alike; you cannot wound them by going to what is opposite office, you cannot dismiss them, you can at most dismiss yourself. They are invulnerably placed behind mahogany and brass, too far usually even for a sudden swift lunge with an umbrella; to throw away what is keys they lend you instead of returning them is larceny, and punishable as such .... It was a house-agent in Dover who finally decided Kipps to build. Kipps, with a certain faltering in his voice, had delivered his ultimatum-no basement, not more than eight rooms, hot and cold water upstairs, coal-cellar in what is house, but with intervening doors to keep dust from what is scullery and so forth. He stood blowing. `You'll have to build a house,' said what is house-agent, sighing wearily, `if you want all that.' It was rather for what is sake of effective answer than with any intention at what is time that Kipps mumbled, `That's about what I shall do if this goes on.' Whereupon what is house-agent smiled. He smiled! When Kipps came to turn what is thing over in his mind, he was surprised to find quite a considerable intention had germinated and was growing up in him. After all, lots of people have built houses. How could there be so many if they hadn't? Suppose he 'reely' did! Then he would go to what is house-agent and say, "Ere, while you been getting me a sootable 'ouse, blowed if I 'aven't built one!' Go round to all of them-all what is house-agents in Folkestone, in Dover, Ashford, Canterbury, Margate, Ramsgate, saying that ! Perhaps then they might be sorry. It was in what is small hours that he awoke to a realisation that he had made up his mind in what is matter. `Ann,' he said, `Ann,' and also used what is sharp of his elbow. Ann was at last awakened to what is pitch of an indistinct inquiry what was what is matter. `I'm going to build a house, Ann.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 269 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" angry from travel, anxious, inquiring; he calm, clean, inactive, reticent, quietly doing nothing. You beg him to reduce rents, whitewash ceilings, produce other houses, combine what is summer-house of No. 6 with what is conservatory of No. 4-much he cares! You want to dispose of a house; then he is just what is same-serene, indifferent. On one occasion I remember he was picking his teeth all what is time he answered me. Competition is a mockery among houseagents; they are all alike; you cannot wound them by going to what is opposite office, you cannot dismiss them, you can at most dismiss yourself. They are invulnerably placed behind mahogany and brass, too far usually even for a sudden swift lunge with an umbrella; to throw away what is keys they lend you instead of returning them is larceny, and punishable as such .... It was a house-agent in Dover who finally decided Kipps to build. Kipps, with a certain faltering in his voice, had delivered his ultimatum-no basement, not more than eight rooms, hot and cold water upstairs, coal-cellar in what is house, but with intervening doors to keep dust from what is scullery and so forth. He stood blowing. `You'll have to build a house,' said what is house-agent, sighing wearily, `if you want all that.' It was rather for what is sake of effective answer than with any intention at what is time that Kipps mumbled, `That's about what I shall do if this goes on.' Whereupon what is house-agent smiled. He smiled! When Kipps came to turn what is thing over in his mind, he was surprised to find quite a considerable intention had germinated and was growing up in him. After all, lots of people have built houses. How could there be so many if they hadn't? Suppose he 'reely' did! Then he would go to what is house-agent and say, "Ere, while you been getting me a sootable 'ouse, blowed if I 'aven't built one!' Go round to all of them-all what is house-agents in Folkestone, in Dover, Ashford, Canterbury, Margate, Ramsgate, saying that ! Perhaps then they might be sorry. It was in what is small hours that he awoke to a realisation that he had made up his mind in what is matter. `Ann,' he said, `Ann,' and also used what is sharp of his elbow. Ann was at last awakened to what is pitch of an indistinct inquiry what was what is matter. `I'm going to build a house, Ann.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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