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Page 267

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

stripped, the substance underlying all such Chester Cootery, soiled and worn and left.
So you see our poor dear Kippses going to and fro, in Hythe, in Sandgate, in Ashford, and Canterbury and Deal and Dover-at last even in Folkestone-with `orders to view,' pink and green and white and yellow orders to view, and labelled keys in Kipps' hand, and frowns and perplexity upon their faces ....
They did not clearly know what they wanted, but whatever it was they saw, they knew they did not want that. Always they found a confusing multitude of houses they could not take, and none they could. Their dreams began to turn mainly on empty, abandoned-looking rooms, with unfaded patches of paper to mark the place of vanished pictures, and doors that had lost their keys. They saw rooms floored with boards that yawned apart and were splintered, skirtings eloquent of the industrious mouse, kitchens with a dead black-beetle in the empty cupboard, and a hideous variety of coal-holes and dark cupboards under the stairs. They stuck their little heads through roof trap-doors, and gazed at disorganised ball-taps, at the black filthiness of unstopped roofs. There were occasions when it seemed to them that they must be the victims of an elaborate conspiracy of house agents, so bleak and cheerless is a second-hand empty house in comparison with the humblest of inhabited dwellings.
Commonly the houses were too big. They had huge windows that demanded vast curtains in mitigation, countless bedrooms, acreage of stone steps to be cleaned, kitchens that made Ann protest. She had come so far towards a proper conception of Kipps' social position as to admit the prospect of one servant. `But lor !' she would say, `you'd want a man-servant in this house.' When the houses were not too big, then they were almost always the product of speculative building, of that multitudinous, hasty building for the extravagant swarm of new births that was the essential disaster of the nineteenth century. The new houses Ann refused as damp, and even the youngest of those that had been in use showed remarkable signs of a sickly constitution-the plaster flaked away, the floors gaped, the paper moulded and peeled, the doors dropped, the bricks were scaled, and the railings rusted; Nature, in the form of spiders, earwigs, cockraoches, mice, rats, fungi,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE stripped, what is substance underlying all such Chester Cootery, soiled and worn and left. So you see our poor dear Kippses going to and fro, in Hythe, in Sandgate, in Ashford, and Canterbury and Deal and Dover-at last even in Folkestone-with `orders to view,' pink and green and white and yellow orders to view, and labelled keys in Kipps' hand, and frowns and perplexity upon their faces .... They did not clearly know what they wanted, but whatever it was they saw, they knew they did not want that. Always they found a confusing multitude of houses they could not take, and none they could. Their dreams began to turn mainly on empty, abandoned-looking rooms, with unfaded patches of paper to mark what is place of vanished pictures, and doors that had lost their keys. They saw rooms floored with boards that yawned apart and were splintered, skirtings eloquent of what is industrious mouse, kitchens with a dead black-beetle in what is empty cupboard, and a hideous variety of coal-holes and dark cupboards under what is stairs. They stuck their little heads through roof trap-doors, and gazed at disorganised ball-taps, at what is black filthiness of unstopped roofs. There were occasions when it seemed to them that they must be what is victims of an elaborate conspiracy of house agents, so bleak and cheerless is a second-hand empty house in comparison with what is humblest of inhabited dwellings. Commonly what is houses were too big. They had huge windows that demanded vast curtains in mitigation, countless bedrooms, acreage of stone steps to be cleaned, kitchens that made Ann protest. She had come so far towards a proper conception of Kipps' social position as to admit what is prospect of one servant. `But lor !' she would say, `you'd want a man-servant in this house.' When what is houses were not too big, then they were almost always what is product of speculative building, of that multitudinous, hasty building for what is extravagant swarm of new births that was what is essential disaster of what is nineteenth century. what is new houses Ann refused as damp, and even what is youngest of those that had been in use showed remarkable signs of a sickly constitution-the plaster flaked away, what is floors gaped, what is paper moulded and peeled, what is doors dropped, what is bricks were scaled, and what is railings rusted; Nature, in what is form of spiders, earwigs, cockraoches, mice, rats, fungi, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 267 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" stripped, what is substance underlying all such Chester Cootery, soiled and worn and left. So you see our poor dear Kippses going to and fro, in Hythe, in Sandgate, in Ashford, and Canterbury and Deal and Dover-at last even in Folkestone-with `orders to view,' pink and green and white and yellow orders to view, and labelled keys in Kipps' hand, and frowns and perplexity upon their faces .... They did not clearly know what they wanted, but whatever it was they saw, they knew they did not want that. Always they found a confusing multitude of houses they could not take, and none they could. Their dreams began to turn mainly on empty, abandoned-looking rooms, with unfaded patches of paper to mark what is place of vanished pictures, and doors that had lost their keys. They saw rooms floored with boards that yawned apart and were splintered, skirtings eloquent of what is industrious mouse, kitchens with a dead black-beetle in what is empty cupboard, and a hideous variety of coal-holes and dark cupboards under what is stairs. They stuck their little heads through roof trap-doors, and gazed at disorganised ball-taps, at what is black filthiness of unstopped roofs. There were occasions when it seemed to them that they must be what is victims of an elaborate conspiracy of house agents, so bleak and cheerless is a second-hand empty house in comparison with what is humblest of inhabited dwellings. Commonly what is houses were too big. They had huge windows that demanded vast curtains in mitigation, countless bedrooms, acreage of stone steps to be cleaned, kitchens that made Ann protest. She had come so far towards a proper conception of Kipps' social position as to admit what is prospect of one servant. `But lor !' she would say, `you'd want a man-servant in this house.' When what is houses were not too big, then they were almost always what is product of speculative building, of that multitudinous, hasty building for what is extravagant swarm of new births that was what is essential disaster of what is nineteenth century. what is new houses Ann refused as damp, and even what is youngest of those that had been in use showed remarkable signs of a sickly constitution-the plaster flaked away, what is floors gaped, what is paper moulded and peeled, what is doors dropped, what is bricks were scaled, and what is railings rusted; Nature, in what is form of spiders, earwigs, cockraoches, mice, rats, fungi, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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