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Page 266

THE HOUSING PROBLEM

the two golfers, and the lady with daughters, who had also got out of the train. And Kipps, a little pale, blowing a little, not in complete possession of himself, knew that they noticed her and him. And Ann- It is hard to say just what Ann observed of these things.
" Ere!' said Kipps to a cabman, and regretted too late a vanished `H.'
`I got a trunk up there,' he said to a ticket-inspector, `marked A.K.'
`Ask a porter,' said the inspector, turning his back.
`Demn !' said Kipps, not altogether inaudibly.

§ 2
It is all very well to sit in the sunshine and talk of the house you will have, and another altogether to achieve it. We English-all the world, indeed, to-day-live in a strange atmosphere of neglected great issues, of insistent, triumphant petty things; we are given up to the fine littlenesses of intercourse; table manners and small correctitudes are the substance of our lives. You do not escape these things for long, even by so catastrophic a proceeding as flying to London with a young lady of no wealth and inferior social position. The mists of noble emotion swirl and pass, and there you are, divorced from all your deities, and grazing in the meadows under the Argus eyes of the social system, the innumerable mean judgments you feel raining upon you, upon your clothes and bearing, upon your pretensions and movements.
Our world to-day is a meanly conceived one-it is only an added meanness to conceal that fact. For one consequence, it has very few nice little houses. Such things do not come for the asking; they are not to be bought with money during ignoble times. Its houses are built on the ground of monstrously rich, shabbily extortionate landowners, by poor, parsimonious, greedy people in a mood of elbowing competition. What can you expect from such ridiculous conditions? To go house-hunting is to spy out the nakedness of this pretentious world, to see what our civilisation amounts to when you take away curtains and flounces and carpets, and all the fluster and distraction of people and fittings. It is to see mean plans meanly executed for mean ends, the conventions torn aside, the secrets

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the two golfers, and what is lady with daughters, who had also got out of what is train. And Kipps, a little pale, blowing a little, not in complete possession of himself, knew that they noticed her and him. And Ann- It is hard to say just what Ann observed of these things. " Ere!' said Kipps to a cabman, and regretted too late a vanished `H.' `I got a trunk up there,' he said to a ticket-inspector, `marked A.K.' `Ask a porter,' said what is inspector, turning his back. `Demn !' said Kipps, not altogether inaudibly. § 2 It is all very well to sit in what is sunshine and talk of what is house you will have, and another altogether to achieve it. We English-all what is world, indeed, to-day-live in a strange atmosphere of neglected great issues, of insistent, triumphant petty things; we are given up to what is fine littlenesses of intercourse; table manners and small correctitudes are what is substance of our lives. You do not escape these things for long, even by so catastrophic a proceeding as flying to London with a young lady of no wealth and inferior social position. what is mists of noble emotion swirl and pass, and there you are, divorced from all your deities, and grazing in what is meadows under what is Argus eyes of what is social system, what is innumerable mean judgments you feel raining upon you, upon your clothes and bearing, upon your pretensions and movements. Our world to-day is a meanly conceived one-it is only an added meanness to conceal that fact. For one consequence, it has very few nice little houses. Such things do not come for what is asking; they are not to be bought with money during ignoble times. Its houses are built on what is ground of monstrously rich, shabbily extortionate landowners, by poor, parsimonious, greedy people in a mood of elbowing competition. What can you expect from such ridiculous conditions? To go house-hunting is to spy out what is nakedness of this pretentious world, to see what our civilisation amounts to when you take away curtains and flounces and carpets, and all what is fluster and distraction of people and fittings. It is to see mean plans meanly executed for mean ends, what is conventions torn aside, what is secrets where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 266 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HOUSING PROBLEM where is p align="justify" the two golfers, and what is lady with daughters, who had also got out of what is train. And Kipps, a little pale, blowing a little, not in complete possession of himself, knew that they noticed her and him. And Ann- It is hard to say just what Ann observed of these things. " Ere!' said Kipps to a cabman, and regretted too late a vanished `H.' `I got a trunk up there,' he said to a ticket-inspector, `marked A.K.' `Ask a porter,' said what is inspector, turning his back. `Demn !' said Kipps, not altogether inaudibly. where is strong § 2 It is all very well to sit in what is sunshine and talk of what is house you will have, and another altogether to achieve it. We English-all what is world, indeed, to-day-live in a strange atmosphere of neglected great issues, of insistent, triumphant petty things; we are given up to what is fine littlenesses of intercourse; table manners and small correctitudes are what is substance of our lives. You do not escape these things for long, even by so catastrophic a proceeding as flying to London with a young lady of no wealth and inferior social position. what is mists of noble emotion swirl and pass, and there you are, divorced from all your deities, and grazing in what is meadows under what is Argus eyes of what is social system, what is innumerable mean judgments you feel raining upon you, upon your clothes and bearing, upon your pretensions and movements. Our world to-day is a meanly conceived one-it is only an added meanness to conceal that fact. For one consequence, it has very few nice little houses. Such things do not come for what is asking; they are not to be bought with money during ignoble times. Its houses are built on what is ground of monstrously rich, shabbily extortionate landowners, by poor, parsimonious, greedy people in a mood of elbowing competition. What can you expect from such ridiculous conditions? To go house-hunting is to spy out what is nakedness of this pretentious world, to see what our civilisation amounts to when you take away curtains and flounces and carpets, and all what is fluster and distraction of people and fittings. It is to see mean plans meanly executed for mean ends, what is conventions torn aside, what is secrets where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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