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BOOK THREE
KIPPSES
CHAPTER THE FIRST
The Housing Problem

§ 1
HONEYMOONS and all things come to an end, and you see at last Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kipps descending upon the Hythe platform-coming to Hythe to find that nice little house, to realise that bright dream of a home they had first talked about in the grounds of the Crystal Palace. They are a valiant couple, you perceive, but small, and the world is a large, incongruous system of complex and difficult things. Kipps wears a gray suit, with a wing poke collar and a neat, smart tie. Mrs. Kipps is the same bright and healthy little girl-woman you saw in the marsh, not an inch has been added to her stature in all my voluminous narrative. Only now she wears a hat.
It is a hat verv unlike the hats she used to wear on her Sundays out-a flourishing hat, with feathers and a buckle and bows and things. The price of that hat would take many people's breath away--it cost two guineas! Kipps chose it. Kipps paid for it. They left the shop with flushed cheeks and smarting eyes, glad to be out of range of the condescending sales-woman.
'Artie,' said Ann, `you didn't ought to 'ave '
That was all. And, you know, the hat didn't suit Ann a bit. Her clothes did not suit her at all. The simple, cheap, clean brightness of her former style had given place not only to this hat, but to several other things in the same key. And out from among these things looked her pretty face, the face of a wise little child-an artless wonder struggling through a preposterous dignity.
They had bought that hat one day when they had gone to see the shops in Bond Street. Kipps had looked at the passers-by, and it had suddenlv occurred to him that Ann was dowdy. He had noted the hat of a very proud-looking lady passing in an electric brougham, and had resolved to get Ann the nearest thing to that.
The railway porters perceived some subtle incongruity in Ann, so did the knot of cabmen in the station doorway,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong § 1 HONEYMOONS and all things come to an end, and you see at last Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kipps descending upon what is Hythe platform-coming to Hythe to find that nice little house, to realise that bright dream of a home they had first talked about in what is grounds of what is Crystal Palace. They are a valiant couple, you perceive, but small, and what is world is a large, incongruous system of complex and difficult things. Kipps wears a gray suit, with a wing poke collar and a neat, smart tie. Mrs. Kipps is what is same bright and healthy little girl-woman you saw in what is marsh, not an inch has been added to her stature in all my voluminous narrative. Only now she wears a hat. It is a hat verv unlike what is hats she used to wear on her Sundays out-a flourishing hat, with feathers and a buckle and bows and things. what is price of that hat would take many people's breath away--it cost two guineas! Kipps chose it. Kipps paid for it. They left what is shop with flushed cheeks and smarting eyes, glad to be out of range of what is condescending sales-woman. 'Artie,' said Ann, `you didn't ought to 'ave ' That was all. And, you know, what is hat didn't suit Ann a bit. Her clothes did not suit her at all. what is simple, cheap, clean brightness of her former style had given place not only to this hat, but to several other things in what is same key. And out from among these things looked her pretty face, what is face of a wise little child-an artless wonder struggling through a preposterous dignity. They had bought that hat one day when they had gone to see what is shops in Bond Street. Kipps had looked at what is passers-by, and it had suddenlv occurred to him that Ann was dowdy. He had noted what is hat of a very proud-looking lady passing in an electric brougham, and had resolved to get Ann what is nearest thing to that. what is railway porters perceived some subtle incongruity in Ann, so did what is knot of cabmen in what is station doorway, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 265 where is p align="center" where is strong BOOK THREE KIPPSES CHAPTER what is FIRST what is Housing Problem where is p align="justify" where is strong § 1 HONEYMOONS and all things come to an end, and you see at last Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kipps descending upon the Hythe platform-coming to Hythe to find that nice little house, to realise that bright dream of a home they had first talked about in what is grounds of the Crystal Palace. They are a valiant couple, you perceive, but small, and what is world is a large, incongruous system of complex and difficult things. Kipps wears a gray suit, with a wing poke collar and a neat, smart tie. Mrs. Kipps is what is same bright and healthy little girl-woman you saw in what is marsh, not an inch has been added to her stature in all my voluminous narrative. Only now she wears a hat. It is a hat verv unlike what is hats she used to wear on her Sundays out-a flourishing hat, with feathers and a buckle and bows and things. what is price of that hat would take many people's breath away--it cost two guineas! Kipps chose it. Kipps paid for it. They left what is shop with flushed cheeks and smarting eyes, glad to be out of range of what is condescending sales-woman. 'Artie,' said Ann, `you didn't ought to 'ave ' That was all. And, you know, what is hat didn't suit Ann a bit. Her clothes did not suit her at all. what is simple, cheap, clean brightness of her former style had given place not only to this hat, but to several other things in what is same key. And out from among these things looked her pretty face, what is face of a wise little child-an artless wonder struggling through a preposterous dignity. They had bought that hat one day when they had gone to see the shops in Bond Street. Kipps had looked at what is passers-by, and it had suddenlv occurred to him that Ann was dowdy. He had noted the hat of a very proud-looking lady passing in an electric brougham, and had resolved to get Ann what is nearest thing to that. what is railway porters perceived some subtle incongruity in Ann, so did what is knot of cabmen in what is station doorway, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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