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Page 247

KIPPS ENTERS SOCIETY

To Kipps Helen had once supplied a delicately beautiful dream, a thing of romance and unsubstantial mystery. But this was her final materialisation, and the last thin wreath of glamour about her was dispelled. In some way (he had forgotten how, and it was perfectly incomprehensible) he was bound to this dark, solid and determined young person, whose shadow and suggestion he had once loved. He had to go through with the thing as a gentleman should. Still
And then he was sacrificing Ann!
He wouldn't stand this sort of thing, whatever else he stood .... Should he say something about her dress to her-to-morrow? '
He could put his foot down firmly. He could say, `Look 'ere. I don't care. I ain't going to stand it. See?'
She'd say something unexpected, of course. She always did say something unexpected.
Suppose, for once, he overrode what she said, and simply repeated his point.
He found these thoughts battling with certain conversational aggressions from Mrs. Wace, and then Revel arrived and took the centre of the stage.
The author of that brilliant romance, Red Hearts aBeating, was a less imposing man than Kipps had anticipated, but he speedily effaced that disappointment by his predominating manners. Although he lived habitually in the vivid world of London, his collar and tie were in no way remarkable, and he was neither brilliantly handsome nor curly, nor long-haired. His personal appearance suggested arm-chairs rather than the equestrian exercises and amorous toyings and passionate intensities of' his masterpiece; he was inclined to be fat, with whitish flesh, muddy-coloured straight hair; he had a rather shapeless and truncated nose, and his chin was asymmetrical. One eye was more inclined to stare than the other. He might have been esteemed a little undistinguishedlooking were it not for his beeswaxed moustache, which came amidst his features with a pleasing note of incongruity, and the whimsical wrinkles above and about his greater eye. His regard sought and found Helen's as he entered the room, and they shook hands presently with an air of intimacy Kipps, for no clear reason, found objectionable. He saw them clasp their hands, heard Coote's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE To Kipps Helen had once supplied a delicately beautiful dream, a thing of romance and unsubstantial mystery. But this was her final materialisation, and what is last thin wreath of glamour about her was dispelled. In some way (he had forgotten how, and it was perfectly incomprehensible) he was bound to this dark, solid and determined young person, whose shadow and suggestion he had once loved. He had to go through with what is thing as a gentleman should. Still And then he was sacrificing Ann! He wouldn't stand this sort of thing, whatever else he stood .... Should he say something about her dress to her-to-morrow? ' He could put his foot down firmly. He could say, `Look 'ere. I don't care. I ain't going to stand it. See?' She'd say something unexpected, of course. She always did say something unexpected. Suppose, for once, he overrode what she said, and simply repeated his point. He found these thoughts battling with certain conversational aggressions from Mrs. Wace, and then Revel arrived and took what is centre of what is stage. what is author of that brilliant romance, Red Hearts aBeating, was a less imposing man than Kipps had anticipated, but he speedily effaced that disappointment by his predominating manners. Although he lived habitually in what is vivid world of London, his collar and tie were in no way remarkable, and he was neither brilliantly handsome nor curly, nor long-haired. His personal appearance suggested arm-chairs rather than what is equestrian exercises and amorous toyings and passionate intensities of' his masterpiece; he was inclined to be fat, with whitish flesh, muddy-coloured straight hair; he had a rather shapeless and truncated nose, and his chin was asymmetrical. One eye was more inclined to stare than what is other. He might have been esteemed a little undistinguishedlooking were it not for his beeswaxed moustache, which came amidst his features with a pleasing note of incongruity, and what is whimsical wrinkles above and about his greater eye. His regard sought and found Helen's as he entered what is room, and they shook hands presently with an air of intimacy Kipps, for no clear reason, found objectionable. He saw them clasp their hands, heard Coote's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is p align="center" where is strong KIPPS ENTERS SOCIETY where is p align="justify" To Kipps Helen had once supplied a delicately beautiful dream, a thing of romance and unsubstantial mystery. But this was her final materialisation, and what is last thin wreath of glamour about her was dispelled. In some way (he had forgotten how, and it was perfectly incomprehensible) he was bound to this dark, solid and determined young person, whose shadow and suggestion he had once loved. He had to go through with what is thing as a gentleman should. Still And then he was sacrificing Ann! He wouldn't stand this sort of thing, whatever else he stood .... Should he say something about her dress to her-to-morrow? ' He could put his foot down firmly. He could say, `Look 'ere. I don't care. I ain't going to stand it. See?' She'd say something unexpected, of course. She always did say something unexpected. Suppose, for once, he overrode what she said, and simply repeated his point. He found these thoughts battling with certain conversational aggressions from Mrs. Wace, and then Revel arrived and took what is centre of the stage. what is author of that brilliant romance, Red Hearts aBeating, was a less imposing man than Kipps had anticipated, but he speedily effaced that disappointment by his predominating manners. Although he lived habitually in what is vivid world of London, his collar and tie were in no way remarkable, and he was neither brilliantly handsome nor curly, nor long-haired. His personal appearance suggested arm-chairs rather than what is equestrian exercises and amorous toyings and passionate intensities of' his masterpiece; he was inclined to be fat, with whitish flesh, muddy-coloured straight hair; he had a rather shapeless and truncated nose, and his chin was asymmetrical. One eye was more inclined to stare than what is other. He might have been esteemed a little undistinguishedlooking were it not for his beeswaxed moustache, which came amidst his features with a pleasing note of incongruity, and what is whimsical wrinkles above and about his greater eye. His regard sought and found Helen's as he entered what is room, and they shook hands presently with an air of intimacy Kipps, for no clear reason, found objectionable. He saw them clasp their hands, heard Coote's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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