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Page 239

KIPPS ENTERS SOCIETY

afternoon. Helen's first reproof had always lingered in his mind. He wore a frock-coat, but mitigated it by a Panama hat of romantic shape with a black band, gray gloves, but, for relaxation, brown button boots. The only other man besides the clergy present-a new doctor with an attractive wife-was in full afternoon dress. Coote was not there.
Kipps was a little pale, but quite self-possessed, as he approached Mrs. Bindon Botting's door. He took a turn while some people went in, and then faced it manfully. The door opened and revealed-Ann!
In the background, through a draped doorway, behind a big fern in a great art pot, the elder Miss Botting was visible talking to two guests; the auditory background was a froth of feminine voices ....
Our two young people were much too amazed to give one another any formula of greeting, though they had parted warmly enough. Each was already in a state of extreme tension to meet the demands of this great and unprecedented occasion-an Anagram Tea. `Lor !' said Ann, her sole remark; and then the sense of Miss Botting's eye ruled her straight again. She became very pale, but she took his hat mechanically, and he was already removing his gloves. `Ann,' he said in a low tone, and then 'Fency!'
The eldest Miss Botting knew Kipps was the sort of guest who requires nursing, and she came forward vocalising charm. She said it was `awfully jolly of him to comeawfully jolly. It was awfully difficult to get any good men!'
She handed Kipps forward, mumbling, and in a dazed condition, to the drawing-room, and there he encountered Helen, looking unfamiliar in an unfamiliar hat. It was as if he had not met her for years.
She astonished him. She didn't seem to mind in the least his going to London. She held out a shapely hand, and smiled encouragingly. `You've faced the anagrams?' she said.
The second Miss Botting accosted them, a number of oblong pieces of paper in her hand, mysteriously inscribed. `Take an anagram,' she said; `take an anagram,' and boldly pinned one of these brief documents to Kipps' lapel. The letters were 'Cypshi,' and Kipps from the very beginning suspected this was an anagram for Cuyps. She also left a thing like a long dance programme, from which dangled a little pencil, in his hand. He found himself being introduced to people, and then he was in a corner with

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE afternoon. Helen's first reproof had always lingered in his mind. He wore a frock-coat, but mitigated it by a Panama hat of romantic shape with a black band, gray gloves, but, for relaxation, brown button boots. what is only other man besides what is clergy present-a new doctor with an attractive wife-was in full afternoon dress. Coote was not there. Kipps was a little pale, but quite self-possessed, as he approached Mrs. Bindon Botting's door. He took a turn while some people went in, and then faced it manfully. what is door opened and revealed-Ann! In what is background, through a draped doorway, behind a big fern in a great art pot, what is elder Miss Botting was visible talking to two guests; what is auditory background was a froth of feminine voices .... Our two young people were much too amazed to give one another any formula of greeting, though they had parted warmly enough. Each was already in a state of extreme tension to meet what is demands of this great and unprecedented occasion-an Anagram Tea. `Lor !' said Ann, her sole remark; and then what is sense of Miss Botting's eye ruled her straight again. She became very pale, but she took his hat mechanically, and he was already removing his gloves. `Ann,' he said in a low tone, and then 'Fency!' what is eldest Miss Botting knew Kipps was what is sort of guest who requires nursing, and she came forward vocalising charm. She said it was `awfully jolly of him to comeawfully jolly. It was awfully difficult to get any good men!' She handed Kipps forward, mumbling, and in a dazed condition, to what is drawing-room, and there he encountered Helen, looking unfamiliar in an unfamiliar hat. It was as if he had not met her for years. She astonished him. She didn't seem to mind in what is least his going to London. She held out a shapely hand, and smiled encouragingly. `You've faced what is anagrams?' she said. what is second Miss Botting accosted them, a number of oblong pieces of paper in her hand, mysteriously inscribed. `Take an anagram,' she said; `take an anagram,' and boldly pinned one of these brief documents to Kipps' lapel. what is letters were 'Cypshi,' and Kipps from what is very beginning suspected this was an anagram for Cuyps. She also left a thing like a long dance programme, from which dangled a little pencil, in his hand. He found himself being introduced to people, and then he was in a corner with where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 239 where is p align="center" where is strong KIPPS ENTERS SOCIETY where is p align="justify" afternoon. Helen's first reproof had always lingered in his mind. He wore a frock-coat, but mitigated it by a Panama hat of romantic shape with a black band, gray gloves, but, for relaxation, brown button boots. what is only other man besides the clergy present-a new doctor with an attractive wife-was in full afternoon dress. Coote was not there. Kipps was a little pale, but quite self-possessed, as he approached Mrs. Bindon Botting's door. He took a turn while some people went in, and then faced it manfully. what is door opened and revealed-Ann! In what is background, through a draped doorway, behind a big fern in a great art pot, what is elder Miss Botting was visible talking to two guests; what is auditory background was a froth of feminine voices .... Our two young people were much too amazed to give one another any formula of greeting, though they had parted warmly enough. Each was already in a state of extreme tension to meet what is demands of this great and unprecedented occasion-an Anagram Tea. `Lor !' said Ann, her sole remark; and then what is sense of Miss Botting's eye ruled her straight again. She became very pale, but she took his hat mechanically, and he was already removing his gloves. `Ann,' he said in a low tone, and then 'Fency!' what is eldest Miss Botting knew Kipps was what is sort of guest who requires nursing, and she came forward vocalising charm. She said it was `awfully jolly of him to comeawfully jolly. It was awfully difficult to get any good men!' She handed Kipps forward, mumbling, and in a dazed condition, to what is drawing-room, and there he encountered Helen, looking unfamiliar in an unfamiliar hat. It was as if he had not met her for years. She astonished him. She didn't seem to mind in what is least his going to London. She held out a shapely hand, and smiled encouragingly. `You've faced what is anagrams?' she said. what is second Miss Botting accosted them, a number of oblong pieces of paper in her hand, mysteriously inscribed. `Take an anagram,' she said; `take an anagram,' and boldly pinned one of these brief documents to Kipps' lapel. what is letters were 'Cypshi,' and Kipps from what is very beginning suspected this was an anagram for Cuyps. She also left a thing like a long dance programme, from which dangled a little pencil, in his hand. He found himself being introduced to people, and then he was in a corner with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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