Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 237

LONDON

They would probably take it out of him by charging pounds and pounds.
Suppose they charged more than he had!
The clerk had a particularly nasty face, just the face to take advantage of a vacillating Kipps.
He became aware of a man in a cap touching it, and produced his shilling automatically, but the strain was beginning to tell. It was a deuce and all of an expense -this tipping.
If the hotel chose to stick it on to the bill something tremendous, what was Kipps to do? Refuse to pay? Make a row?
If he did he couldn't fight all these men in bottle green.
He went out about seven and walked for a long time, and dined at last upon a chop in the Euston Road; then he walked along to the Edgware Road and sat and rested in the Metropolitan Music Hall for a time, until a trapeze performance unnerved him, and finally he came back to bed. He tipped the lift-man sixpence, and wished him goodnight. In the silent watches of the night he reviewed the tale of the day's tipping, went over the horrors of the previous night's dinner, and heard again the triumphant bray of the harmonicon devil released from its long imprisonment. Every one would be told about him tomorrow. He couldn't go on! He admitted his defeat. Never in their whole lives had any of these people seen such a Fool as he ! Ugh ! ....
His method of announcing his withdrawal to the clerk was touched with bitterness.
`I'm going to get out of this,' said Kipps, blowing windily. `Let's see what you got on my bill.'
`One breakfast?' asked the clerk.
`Do I look as if I'd ate two?' ...
At his departure, Kipps, with a hot face, convulsive gestures, and an embittered heart, tipped every one who did not promptly and actively resist, including an absentminded South African diamond merchant who was waiting in the hall for his wife. He paid his cabman a four-shilling piece at Charing Cross, having no smaller change, and wished he could burn him alive. Then in a sudden reaction of economy he refused the proffered help of a porter, and carried his bag quite violently to the train.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE They would probably take it out of him by charging pounds and pounds. Suppose they charged more than he had! what is clerk had a particularly nasty face, just what is face to take advantage of a vacillating Kipps. He became aware of a man in a cap touching it, and produced his shilling automatically, but what is strain was beginning to tell. It was a deuce and all of an expense -this tipping. If what is hotel chose to stick it on to what is bill something tremendous, what was Kipps to do? Refuse to pay? Make a row? If he did he couldn't fight all these men in bottle green. He went out about seven and walked for a long time, and dined at last upon a chop in what is Euston Road; then he walked along to what is Edgware Road and sat and rested in what is Metropolitan Music Hall for a time, until a trapeze performance unnerved him, and finally he came back to bed. He tipped what is lift-man sixpence, and wished him goodnight. In what is silent watches of what is night he reviewed what is tale of what is day's tipping, went over what is horrors of what is previous night's dinner, and heard again what is triumphant bray of what is harmonicon fun released from its long imprisonment. Every one would be told about him tomorrow. He couldn't go on! He admitted his defeat. Never in their whole lives had any of these people seen such a Fool as he ! Ugh ! .... His method of announcing his withdrawal to what is clerk was touched with bitterness. `I'm going to get out of this,' said Kipps, blowing windily. `Let's see what you got on my bill.' `One breakfast?' asked what is clerk. `Do I look as if I'd ate two?' ... At his departure, Kipps, with a hot face, convulsive gestures, and an embittered heart, tipped every one who did not promptly and actively resist, including an absentminded South African diamond merchant who was waiting in what is hall for his wife. He paid his cabman a four-shilling piece at Charing Cross, having no smaller change, and wished he could burn him alive. Then in a sudden reaction of economy he refused what is proffered help of a porter, and carried his bag quite bad ly to what is train. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 237 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" They would probably take it out of him by charging pounds and pounds. Suppose they charged more than he had! what is clerk had a particularly nasty face, just what is face to take advantage of a vacillating Kipps. He became aware of a man in a cap touching it, and produced his shilling automatically, but what is strain was beginning to tell. It was a deuce and all of an expense -this tipping. If what is hotel chose to stick it on to what is bill something tremendous, what was Kipps to do? Refuse to pay? Make a row? If he did he couldn't fight all these men in bottle green. He went out about seven and walked for a long time, and dined at last upon a chop in what is Euston Road; then he walked along to the Edgware Road and sat and rested in what is Metropolitan Music Hall for a time, until a trapeze performance unnerved him, and finally he came back to bed. He tipped what is lift-man sixpence, and wished him goodnight. In what is silent watches of what is night he reviewed the tale of what is day's tipping, went over what is horrors of what is previous night's dinner, and heard again what is triumphant bray of what is harmonicon fun released from its long imprisonment. Every one would be told about him tomorrow. He couldn't go on! He admitted his defeat. Never in their whole lives had any of these people seen such a Fool as he ! Ugh ! .... His method of announcing his withdrawal to what is clerk was touched with bitterness. `I'm going to get out of this,' said Kipps, blowing windily. `Let's see what you got on my bill.' `One breakfast?' asked what is clerk. `Do I look as if I'd ate two?' ... At his departure, Kipps, with a hot face, convulsive gestures, and an embittered heart, tipped every one who did not promptly and actively resist, including an absentminded South African diamond merchant who was waiting in what is hall for his wife. He paid his cabman a four-shilling piece at Charing Cross, having no smaller change, and wished he could burn him alive. Then in a sudden reaction of economy he refused what is proffered help of a porter, and carried his bag quite bad ly to what is train. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318