Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 235

LONDON

upper and upper middle classes began to come and group themselves about him and have tea likewise, and so revive the class animosities of the previous day.
Presently a flufry fair-haired lady came into prominent existence a few yards away. She was talking to a respectful low-voiced clergyman, whom she was possibly entertaining at tea. `No,' she said; `dear Lady Jane wouldn't do that!'
'Mumble, mumble, mumble,' from the clergyman.
`Poor dear Lady Jane was always so sensitive,' the voice of the lady sang out clear and emphatic.
A fat, hairless, important-looking man joined this group, took a chair, and planted it firmly with its back in the face of Kipps, a thing that offended Kipps mightily. `Are you telling him,' gurgled the fat, hairless man, `about dear Lady Jane's affliction?' A young couple, lady brilliantly attired, and the man in a magnificently cut frockcoat, arranged themselves to the right, also with an air of exclusion towards Kipps. `I've told him,' said the gentleman in a flat, abundant voice. `My!' said the young lady with an American smile. No doubt they all thought Kipps was out of it. A great desire to assert himself in some way surged up in his heart. He felt he would like to cut in on the conversation in some dramatic way. A monologue, something in the manner of Masterman? At any rate, abandoning that as impossible, he would like to appear self-centred and at ease. His eye, wandering over the black surfaces of a noble architectural mass close by, discovered a slot and an enamelled plaque of directions.
It occurred to Kipps that he would like some music, that to inaugurate some would show him a man of taste and at his ease at the same time. He rose, read over a list of tunes, selected one haphazard, pressed his sixpenceit was sixpence!-home, and prepared for a confidential refined little melody.
Considering the high social tone of the Royal Grand, it was really a very loud instrument indeed. It gave vent to three deafening brays, and so burst the dam of silence that had long pent it in. It seemed to be chiefly full of the great-uncles of trumpets, megalo-trombones, and railwaybrakes. It made sounds like shunting trains. It did not so much begin as blow up your counterscarp and rush forward to storm under cover of melodious shrapnel. It had not so much an air as a ricochet. The music had, in short,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE upper and upper middle classes began to come and group themselves about him and have tea likewise, and so revive what is class animosities of what is previous day. Presently a flufry fair-haired lady came into prominent existence a few yards away. She was talking to a respectful low-voiced clergyman, whom she was possibly entertaining at tea. `No,' she said; `dear Lady Jane wouldn't do that!' 'Mumble, mumble, mumble,' from what is clergyman. `Poor dear Lady Jane was always so sensitive,' what is voice of what is lady sang out clear and emphatic. A fat, hairless, important-looking man joined this group, took a chair, and planted it firmly with its back in what is face of Kipps, a thing that offended Kipps mightily. `Are you telling him,' gurgled what is fat, hairless man, `about dear Lady Jane's affliction?' A young couple, lady brilliantly attired, and what is man in a magnificently cut frockcoat, arranged themselves to what is right, also with an air of exclusion towards Kipps. `I've told him,' said what is gentleman in a flat, abundant voice. `My!' said what is young lady with an American smile. No doubt they all thought Kipps was out of it. A great desire to assert himself in some way surged up in his heart. He felt he would like to cut in on what is conversation in some dramatic way. A monologue, something in what is manner of Masterman? At any rate, abandoning that as impossible, he would like to appear self-centred and at ease. His eye, wandering over what is black surfaces of a noble architectural mass close by, discovered a slot and an enamelled plaque of directions. It occurred to Kipps that he would like some music, that to inaugurate some would show him a man of taste and at his ease at what is same time. He rose, read over a list of tunes, selected one haphazard, pressed his sixpenceit was sixpence!-home, and prepared for a confidential refined little melody. Considering what is high social tone of what is Royal Grand, it was really a very loud instrument indeed. It gave vent to three deafening brays, and so burst what is dam of silence that had long pent it in. It seemed to be chiefly full of what is great-uncles of trumpets, megalo-trombones, and railwaybrakes. It made sounds like shunting trains. It did not so much begin as blow up your counterscarp and rush forward to storm under cover of melodious shrapnel. It had not so much an air as a ricochet. what is music had, in short, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 235 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" upper and upper middle classes began to come and group themselves about him and have tea likewise, and so revive what is class animosities of what is previous day. Presently a flufry fair-haired lady came into prominent existence a few yards away. She was talking to a respectful low-voiced clergyman, whom she was possibly entertaining at tea. `No,' she said; `dear Lady Jane wouldn't do that!' 'Mumble, mumble, mumble,' from what is clergyman. `Poor dear Lady Jane was always so sensitive,' what is voice of the lady sang out clear and emphatic. A fat, hairless, important-looking man joined this group, took a chair, and planted it firmly with its back in what is face of Kipps, a thing that offended Kipps mightily. `Are you telling him,' gurgled what is fat, hairless man, `about dear Lady Jane's affliction?' A young couple, lady brilliantly attired, and what is man in a magnificently cut frockcoat, arranged themselves to what is right, also with an air of exclusion towards Kipps. `I've told him,' said what is gentleman in a flat, abundant voice. `My!' said what is young lady with an American smile. No doubt they all thought Kipps was out of it. A great desire to assert himself in some way surged up in his heart. He felt he would like to cut in on what is conversation in some dramatic way. A monologue, something in what is manner of Masterman? At any rate, abandoning that as impossible, he would like to appear self-centred and at ease. His eye, wandering over what is black surfaces of a noble architectural mass close by, discovered a slot and an enamelled plaque of directions. It occurred to Kipps that he would like some music, that to inaugurate some would show him a man of taste and at his ease at what is same time. He rose, read over a list of tunes, selected one haphazard, pressed his sixpenceit was sixpence!-home, and prepared for a confidential refined little melody. Considering what is high social tone of what is Royal Grand, it was really a very loud instrument indeed. It gave vent to three deafening brays, and so burst what is dam of silence that had long pent it in. It seemed to be chiefly full of what is great-uncles of trumpets, megalo-trombones, and railwaybrakes. It made sounds like shunting trains. It did not so much begin as blow up your counterscarp and rush forward to storm under cover of melodious shrapnel. It had not so much an air as a ricochet. what is music had, in short, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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