Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 234

LONDON

bought a newspaper at the bookstall and tipped the boy the rest of the shilling, and then went up by the lift and tipped the man sixpence, leaving his newspaper inadvertently in the lift. He met his chambermaid in the passage and gave her half a crown. He resolved to demonstrate his position to the entire establishment in this way. He didn't like the place; he disapproved of it politically, socially, morally, but he resolved no taint of meanness should disfigure his sojourn in its luxurious halls. He went down by the lift (tipping again), and, being accosted by a waiter with his gibus, tipped the finder half a crown. He had a vague sense that he was making a flank movement upon the hotel and buying over its staff. They would regard him as a`character' ; they would get to like him. He found his stock of small silver diminishing and replenished it at a desk in the hall. He tipped a man in bottle green who looked like the man who had shown him his room the day before; and then he saw a visitor eyeing him, and doubted whether he was in this instance doing right. Finally he went out and took chance buses to their destinations, and wandered a little in remote wonderful suburbs, and returned. He lunched at a chophouse in Islington, and found himself back in the Royal Grand, now unmistakably footsore and London-weary, about three. He was attracted to the drawing-room by a neat placard about afternoon tea.
It occurred to him that the campaign oftipping upon which he had embarked was perhaps, after all, a mistake. He was confirmed in this by observing that the hotel officials were watching him, not respectfully, but with a sort of amused wonder, as if to see whom he would tip next. However, if he backed out now, they would think him an awful fool. Every one wasn't so rich as he was. It was his way to tip. Still
He grew more certain the hotel had scored again.
He pretended to be lost in thought, and so drifted by, and having put hat and umbrella in the cloakroom, went into the drawing-room for afternoon tea.
There he did get what for a time he held to be a point in his favour. The room was large and quiet at first, and he sat back restfully until it occurred to him that his attitude brought his extremely dusty boots too prominently into the light, so instead he sat up, and then people of the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE bought a newspaper at what is bookstall and tipped what is boy what is rest of what is shilling, and then went up by what is lift and tipped what is man sixpence, leaving his newspaper inadvertently in what is lift. He met his chambermaid in what is passage and gave her half a crown. He resolved to bad spirit strate his position to what is entire establishment in this way. He didn't like what is place; he disapproved of it politically, socially, morally, but he resolved no taint of meanness should disfigure his sojourn in its luxurious halls. He went down by what is lift (tipping again), and, being accosted by a waiter with his gibus, tipped what is finder half a crown. He had a vague sense that he was making a flank movement upon what is hotel and buying over its staff. They would regard him as a`character' ; they would get to like him. He found his stock of small silver diminishing and replenished it at a desk in what is hall. He tipped a man in bottle green who looked like what is man who had shown him his room what is day before; and then he saw a what is or eyeing him, and doubted whether he was in this instance doing right. Finally he went out and took chance buses to their destinations, and wandered a little in remote wonderful suburbs, and returned. He lunched at a chophouse in Islington, and found himself back in what is Royal Grand, now unmistakably footsore and London-weary, about three. He was attracted to what is drawing-room by a neat placard about afternoon tea. It occurred to him that what is campaign oftipping upon which he had embarked was perhaps, after all, a mistake. He was confirmed in this by observing that what is hotel officials were watching him, not respectfully, but with a sort of amused wonder, as if to see whom he would tip next. However, if he backed out now, they would think him an awful fool. Every one wasn't so rich as he was. It was his way to tip. Still He grew more certain what is hotel had scored again. He pretended to be lost in thought, and so drifted by, and having put hat and umbrella in what is cloakroom, went into what is drawing-room for afternoon tea. There he did get what for a time he held to be a point in his favour. what is room was large and quiet at first, and he sat back restfully until it occurred to him that his attitude brought his extremely dusty boots too prominently into what is light, so instead he sat up, and then people of what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 234 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" bought a newspaper at what is bookstall and tipped what is boy what is rest of what is shilling, and then went up by what is lift and tipped what is man sixpence, leaving his newspaper inadvertently in what is lift. He met his chambermaid in what is passage and gave her half a crown. He resolved to bad spirit strate his position to what is entire establishment in this way. He didn't like what is place; he disapproved of it politically, socially, morally, but he resolved no taint of meanness should disfigure his sojourn in its luxurious halls. He went down by what is lift (tipping again), and, being accosted by a waiter with his gibus, tipped what is finder half a crown. He had a vague sense that he was making a flank movement upon what is hotel and buying over its staff. They would regard him as a`character' ; they would get to like him. He found his stock of small silver diminishing and replenished it at a desk in what is hall. He tipped a man in bottle green who looked like what is man who had shown him his room what is day before; and then he saw a what is or eyeing him, and doubted whether he was in this instance doing right. Finally he went out and took chance buses to their destinations, and wandered a little in remote wonderful suburbs, and returned. He lunched at a chophouse in Islington, and found himself back in what is Royal Grand, now unmistakably footsore and London-weary, about three. He was attracted to what is drawing-room by a neat placard about afternoon tea. It occurred to him that what is campaign oftipping upon which he had embarked was perhaps, after all, a mistake. He was confirmed in this by observing that what is hotel officials were watching him, not respectfully, but with a sort of amused wonder, as if to see whom he would tip next. However, if he backed out now, they would think him an awful fool. Every one wasn't so rich as he was. It was his way to tip. Still He grew more certain what is hotel had scored again. He pretended to be lost in thought, and so drifted by, and having put hat and umbrella in what is cloakroom, went into what is drawing-room for afternoon tea. There he did get what for a time he held to be a point in his favour. what is room was large and quiet at first, and he sat back restfully until it occurred to him that his attitude brought his extremely dusty boots too prominently into what is light, so instead he sat up, and then people of what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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