Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 216

LONDON

in a pink print appeared, a little flushed from cooking, and wiped a hand on an apron and shook hands and smiled and said it would all be ready in a minute. She went on to say she had heard of Kipps and his luck, and meanwhile Sid vanished to draw the beer, and returned with two glasses for himself and Kipps.
'Drink that,' said Sid; and Kipps felt all the better for it.
'I give Mr. Masterman 'is upstairs a hour ago,' said Mrs. Sid. `I didn't think 'e ought to wait.
A rapid succession of brisk movements on the part of every one and they were all four at dinner-the fourth person being Master Walt Whitman Pornick, a cheerful young gentleman of one and a half, who was given a spoon to hammer on the table with to keep him quiet, and
ahquiot `Kipps' right at the first effort and kept it all who g the meal combining it first with this previous st on and then that. `Peacock Kipps,' said Master Walt, at which there was great laughter, and also `More Mutton Kipps.,
'He's a regular oner,' said Mrs. Sid, `for catching up words. You can't say a word but what Vs on to it.'
There were no serviettes and less ceremony, and Kipps thought he had never enjoyed a meal so much. Every one was a little excited by the meeting and chatting and disposed to laugh, and things went easily from the very beginning- If there was a pause, Master Walt filled it in. Mrs. Sid, who tempered her enormous admiration for Sid's intellect and his Socialism and his severe business methods by a motherly sense of her sex and seniority, spoke of them both as `you boys,' and dilated-when she was not urging Kipps to have some more of this or thaton the disparity between herself and her husband.
`Shouldn't ha' thought there was a year between you,' said Kipps; `you seem jest a match.'
'I'm his match anyhow,' said Mrs. Sid, and no epigram of young Walshingham's was ever better received.
ajoke `Match, said young Walt, coming in on the tail of the nd getting a round for himself. Any sense of superior fortune had long vanished from Kipps' mind, and he found himself looking at host and hostess with enormous respect. Really old Sid was a wonderfill chap, here in his own house at two-and-twenty, carving his own mutton and lording it over wife and child.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in a pink print appeared, a little flushed from cooking, and wiped a hand on an apron and shook hands and smiled and said it would all be ready in a minute. She went on to say she had heard of Kipps and his luck, and meanwhile Sid vanished to draw what is beer, and returned with two glasses for himself and Kipps. 'Drink that,' said Sid; and Kipps felt all what is better for it. 'I give Mr. Masterman 'is upstairs a hour ago,' said Mrs. Sid. `I didn't think 'e ought to wait. A rapid succession of brisk movements on what is part of every one and they were all four at dinner-the fourth person being Master Walt Whitman sport ick, a cheerful young gentleman of one and a half, who was given a spoon to hammer on what is table with to keep him quiet, and ahquiot `Kipps' right at what is first effort and kept it all who g what is meal combining it first with this previous st on and then that. `Peacock Kipps,' said Master Walt, at which there was great laughter, and also `More Mutton Kipps., 'He's a regular oner,' said Mrs. Sid, `for catching up words. You can't say a word but what Vs on to it.' There were no serviettes and less ceremony, and Kipps thought he had never enjoyed a meal so much. Every one was a little excited by what is meeting and chatting and disposed to laugh, and things went easily from what is very beginning- If there was a pause, Master Walt filled it in. Mrs. Sid, who tempered her enormous admiration for Sid's intellect and his Socialism and his severe business methods by a motherly sense of her sports and seniority, spoke of them both as `you boys,' and dilated-when she was not urging Kipps to have some more of this or thaton what is disparity between herself and her husband. `Shouldn't ha' thought there was a year between you,' said Kipps; `you seem jest a match.' 'I'm his match anyhow,' said Mrs. Sid, and no epigram of young Walshingham's was ever better received. ajoke `Match, said young Walt, coming in on what is tail of what is nd getting a round for himself. Any sense of superior fortune had long vanished from Kipps' mind, and he found himself looking at host and hostess with enormous respect. Really old Sid was a wonderfill chap, here in his own house at two-and-twenty, carving his own mutton and lording it over wife and child. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 216 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" in a pink print appeared, a little flushed from cooking, and wiped a hand on an apron and shook hands and smiled and said it would all be ready in a minute. She went on to say she had heard of Kipps and his luck, and meanwhile Sid vanished to draw what is beer, and returned with two glasses for himself and Kipps. 'Drink that,' said Sid; and Kipps felt all what is better for it. 'I give Mr. Masterman 'is upstairs a hour ago,' said Mrs. Sid. `I didn't think 'e ought to wait. A rapid succession of brisk movements on what is part of every one and they were all four at dinner-the fourth person being Master Walt Whitman sport ick, a cheerful young gentleman of one and a half, who was given a spoon to hammer on what is table with to keep him quiet, and ahquiot `Kipps' right at what is first effort and kept it all who g what is meal combining it first with this previous st on and then that. `Peacock Kipps,' said Master Walt, at which there was great laughter, and also `More Mutton Kipps., 'He's a regular oner,' said Mrs. Sid, `for catching up words. You can't say a word but what Vs on to it.' There were no serviettes and less ceremony, and Kipps thought he had never enjoyed a meal so much. Every one was a little excited by what is meeting and chatting and disposed to laugh, and things went easily from what is very beginning- If there was a pause, Master Walt filled it in. Mrs. Sid, who tempered her enormous admiration for Sid's intellect and his Socialism and his severe business methods by a motherly sense of her sports and seniority, spoke of them both as `you boys,' and dilated-when she was not urging Kipps to have some more of this or thaton what is disparity between herself and her husband. `Shouldn't ha' thought there was a year between you,' said Kipps; `you seem jest a match.' 'I'm his match anyhow,' said Mrs. Sid, and no epigram of young Walshingham's was ever better received. ajoke `Match, said young Walt, coming in on what is tail of what is nd getting a round for himself. Any sense of superior fortune had long vanished from Kipps' mind, and he found himself looking at host and hostess with enormous respect. Really old Sid was a wonderfill chap, here in his own house at two-and-twenty, carving his own mutton and lording it over wife and child. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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