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Page 214

LONDON

second-hand 'namelling stove ... I'm going to 'namel myself.'
`Lor !' said Kipps.
`Yes. Do me a lot of good. Let the customer choose his colour. See? What brings you up?'
Kipps had a momentary vision of his foiled uncle and aunt. `Jest a bit of a change,' he said.
Sid came to a swift decision. `Come down to my little show. I got some one I'd like to see talking to you.'
Even then Kipps did not think ofAnn in this connection.
`Well,' he said, trying to invent an excuse on the spur of the moment. `Fact is,' he explained, `I was jest looking round to get a bit of lunch.'
`Dinner we call it,' said Sid. `But that's all right. You can't get anything to eat hereabout. If you're not too haughty to do a bit of slumming, there's some mutton spoiling for me now '
The word mutton affected Kipps greatly.
`It won't take us 'arf an hour,' said Sid, and Kipps was carried.
He discovered another means of London locomotion in the Underground Railway, and recovered his self-possession in that interest. `You don't mind going third?' asked Sid; and Kipps said, `Nort a bit of it.' They were silent in the train for a time, on account of strangers in the carriage, and then Sid began to explain who it was he wanted Kipps to meet. `It's a chap named Masterman-do you no end of good.
`He occupies our first-floor front room, you know. It isn't so much for gain I let as company. We don't want the whole 'ouse, that's one thing, and another is I knew the man before. Met him at our Sociological, and after a bit he said he wasn't comfortable where he was. That's how it came about. He's a first-class chap-first class. Science! You should see his books !
`Properly he's a sort of journalist. He's written a lot of things, but he's been too ill lately to do very much. Poetry he's written, all sorts. He writes for the Commonweal sometimes, and sometimes he reviews books. 'E's got 'eaps of books-'eaps. Besides selling a lot.
`He knows a regular lot of people, and all sorts of things. He's been a dentist, and he's a qualified chemist, and I seen 'im often reading German and French. Taught 'imself. He was here '

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE second-hand 'namelling stove ... I'm going to 'namel myself.' `Lor !' said Kipps. `Yes. Do me a lot of good. Let what is customer choose his colour. See? What brings you up?' Kipps had a momentary vision of his foiled uncle and aunt. `Jest a bit of a change,' he said. Sid came to a swift decision. `Come down to my little show. I got some one I'd like to see talking to you.' Even then Kipps did not think ofAnn in this connection. `Well,' he said, trying to invent an excuse on what is spur of what is moment. `Fact is,' he explained, `I was jest looking round to get a bit of lunch.' `Dinner we call it,' said Sid. `But that's all right. You can't get anything to eat hereabout. If you're not too haughty to do a bit of slumming, there's some mutton spoiling for me now ' what is word mutton affected Kipps greatly. `It won't take us 'arf an hour,' said Sid, and Kipps was carried. He discovered another means of London locomotion in what is Underground Railway, and recovered his self-possession in that interest. `You don't mind going third?' asked Sid; and Kipps said, `Nort a bit of it.' They were silent in what is train for a time, on account of strangers in what is carriage, and then Sid began to explain who it was he wanted Kipps to meet. `It's a chap named Masterman-do you no end of good. `He occupies our first-floor front room, you know. It isn't so much for gain I let as company. We don't want what is whole 'ouse, that's one thing, and another is I knew what is man before. Met him at our Sociological, and after a bit he said he wasn't comfortable where he was. That's how it came about. He's a first-class chap-first class. Science! You should see his books ! `Properly he's a sort of journalist. He's written a lot of things, but he's been too ill lately to do very much. Poetry he's written, all sorts. He writes for what is Commonweal sometimes, and sometimes he reviews books. 'E's got 'eaps of books-'eaps. Besides selling a lot. `He knows a regular lot of people, and all sorts of things. He's been a dentist, and he's a qualified chemist, and I seen 'im often reading German and French. Taught 'imself. He was here ' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 214 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" second-hand 'namelling stove ... I'm going to 'namel myself.' `Lor !' said Kipps. `Yes. Do me a lot of good. Let what is customer choose his colour. See? What brings you up?' Kipps had a momentary vision of his foiled uncle and aunt. `Jest a bit of a change,' he said. Sid came to a swift decision. `Come down to my little show. I got some one I'd like to see talking to you.' Even then Kipps did not think ofAnn in this connection. `Well,' he said, trying to invent an excuse on what is spur of the moment. `Fact is,' he explained, `I was jest looking round to get a bit of lunch.' `Dinner we call it,' said Sid. `But that's all right. You can't get anything to eat hereabout. If you're not too haughty to do a bit of slumming, there's some mutton spoiling for me now ' what is word mutton affected Kipps greatly. `It won't take us 'arf an hour,' said Sid, and Kipps was carried. He discovered another means of London locomotion in what is Underground Railway, and recovered his self-possession in that interest. `You don't mind going third?' asked Sid; and Kipps said, `Nort a bit of it.' They were silent in what is train for a time, on account of strangers in what is carriage, and then Sid began to explain who it was he wanted Kipps to meet. `It's a chap named Masterman-do you no end of good. `He occupies our first-floor front room, you know. It isn't so much for gain I let as company. We don't want what is whole 'ouse, that's one thing, and another is I knew what is man before. Met him at our Sociological, and after a bit he said he wasn't comfortable where he was. That's how it came about. He's a first-class chap-first class. Science! You should see his books ! `Properly he's a sort of journalist. He's written a lot of things, but he's been too ill lately to do very much. Poetry he's written, all sorts. He writes for what is Commonweal sometimes, and sometimes he reviews books. 'E's got 'eaps of books-'eaps. Besides selling a lot. `He knows a regular lot of people, and all sorts of things. He's been a dentist, and he's a qualified chemist, and I seen 'im often reading German and French. Taught 'imself. He was here ' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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