Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 213

LONDON

to food. He didn't know how you went in, and what was the correct thing to do with your hat; he didn't know what you said to the waiter or what you called the different things : he was convinced absolutely he would `fumble,' as Shalford would have'said, and look like a fool. Somebody might laugh at him! The hungrier he got, the more unendurable was the thought that any one should laugh at him. For a time he considered an extraordinary expedient to account for his ignorance. He would go in and pretend to be a foreigner, and not know English. Then they might understand ... Presently he had drifted into a part of London where there did not seem to be any refreshment places at all.
`Oh, desh!' said Kipps, in a sort of agony of indecisiveness. `The very nex' place I see, in I go.'
The next place was a fried-fish shop in a little side street, where there were also sausages on a gas-lit grill.
He would have gone in, but suddenly a new scruple came to him, that he was too well dressed for the company he could see dimly through the steam sitting at the counter and eating with a sort of nonchalant speed.

2
He was half minded to resort to a hansom and brave the terrors of the dining-room of the Royal Grand- they wouldn't know why he had gone out really-when the only person he knew in London appeared (as the only person one does know will do in London) and slapped him on the shoulder. Kipps was hovering at a window at a few yards from the fish shop pretending to examine some really strikingly cheap pink baby-linen, and trying to settle finally about those sausages. 'Hallo, Kipps!' cried Sid, `spending the millions?'
Kipps turned and was glad to perceive no lingering vestige of the chagrin that had been so painful at New Romney. Sid looked grave and important, and he wore a quite new silk hat that gave a commercial touch to a generally socialistic costume. For the moment the sight of Sid uplifted Kipps wonderfully. He saw him as a friend and helper, and only presently did it come clearly into his mind that this was the brother of Ann.
He made amiable noises.
`I've just been up this way,' Sid explained, `buying a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to food. He didn't know how you went in, and what was what is correct thing to do with your hat; he didn't know what you said to what is waiter or what you called what is different things : he was convinced absolutely he would `fumble,' as Shalford would have'said, and look like a fool. Somebody might laugh at him! what is hungrier he got, what is more unendurable was what is thought that any one should laugh at him. For a time he considered an extraordinary expedient to account for his ignorance. He would go in and pretend to be a foreigner, and not know English. Then they might understand ... Presently he had drifted into a part of London where there did not seem to be any refreshment places at all. `Oh, desh!' said Kipps, in a sort of agony of indecisiveness. `The very nex' place I see, in I go.' what is next place was a fried-fish shop in a little side street, where there were also sausages on a gas-lit grill. He would have gone in, but suddenly a new scruple came to him, that he was too well dressed for what is company he could see dimly through what is steam sitting at what is counter and eating with a sort of nonchalant speed. 2 He was half minded to resort to a hansom and brave what is terrors of what is dining-room of what is Royal Grand- they wouldn't know why he had gone out really-when what is only person he knew in London appeared (as what is only person one does know will do in London) and slapped him on what is shoulder. Kipps was hovering at a window at a few yards from what is fish shop pretending to examine some really strikingly cheap pink baby-linen, and trying to settle finally about those sausages. 'Hallo, Kipps!' cried Sid, `spending what is millions?' Kipps turned and was glad to perceive no lingering vestige of what is chagrin that had been so painful at New Romney. Sid looked grave and important, and he wore a quite new silk hat that gave a commercial touch to a generally socialistic costume. For what is moment what is sight of Sid uplifted Kipps wonderfully. He saw him as a friend and helper, and only presently did it come clearly into his mind that this was what is brother of Ann. He made amiable noises. `I've just been up this way,' Sid explained, `buying a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 213 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" to food. He didn't know how you went in, and what was what is correct thing to do with your hat; he didn't know what you said to what is waiter or what you called what is different things : he was convinced absolutely he would `fumble,' as Shalford would have'said, and look like a fool. Somebody might laugh at him! The hungrier he got, what is more unendurable was what is thought that any one should laugh at him. For a time he considered an extraordinary expedient to account for his ignorance. He would go in and pretend to be a foreigner, and not know English. Then they might understand ... Presently he had drifted into a part of London where there did not seem to be any refreshment places at all. `Oh, desh!' said Kipps, in a sort of agony of indecisiveness. `The very nex' place I see, in I go.' what is next place was a fried-fish shop in a little side street, where there were also sausages on a gas-lit grill. He would have gone in, but suddenly a new scruple came to him, that he was too well dressed for what is company he could see dimly through what is steam sitting at what is counter and eating with a sort of nonchalant speed. where is strong 2 He was half minded to resort to a hansom and brave what is terrors of what is dining-room of what is Royal Grand- they wouldn't know why he had gone out really-when what is only person he knew in London appeared (as what is only person one does know will do in London) and slapped him on what is shoulder. Kipps was hovering at a window at a few yards from what is fish shop pretending to examine some really strikingly cheap pink baby-linen, and trying to settle finally about those sausages. 'Hallo, Kipps!' cried Sid, `spending what is millions?' Kipps turned and was glad to perceive no lingering vestige of the chagrin that had been so painful at New Romney. Sid looked grave and important, and he wore a quite new silk hat that gave a commercial touch to a generally socialistic costume. For what is moment what is sight of Sid uplifted Kipps wonderfully. He saw him as a friend and helper, and only presently did it come clearly into his mind that this was what is brother of Ann. He made amiable noises. `I've just been up this way,' Sid explained, `buying a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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