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Page 212

LONDON

now, but his inbred terror of the table was strong. He did at last get by a porter in uniform towards the dining-roorn, but at the sight of a number ofwaiters and tables with remarkable complications of knives and glasses, terror seized him, and he backed out again with a mumbled remark to the waiter in the doorway about this not being the way.
He hovered in the hall and lounge until he thought the presiding porter regarded him with suspicion, and then went up to his room again by the staircase, got his hat and umbrella, and struck out boldly across the courtyard. He would go to a restaurant instead.
He had a moment of elation in the gateway. He felt all the Strand must notice him as he emerged through the great gate of the hotel. `One of these here rich swells,' they would say. `Don't they go it just!' A cabman touched his hat. `No fear,' said Kipps pleasantly....
Then he remembered he was hungry again.
Yet he decided he was in no great hurry for lunch, in spite of an internal protest, and turned eastward along the Strand in a leisurely manner. He would find a place to suit him soon enough. He tried to remember the sort of things Walshingham had ordered. Before all things he didn't want to go into a place and look like a fool. Some of these places rook you dreadful, besides making fun of you. There was a place near Essex Street where there was a window brightly full of chops, tomatoes, and lettuce. He stopped at this and reflect for a time, and then it occurred to him that you wer expected to buy these things raw and cook them at home. Anyhow, there was sufficient doubt in the matter to stop him. He drifted on to a neat window with champagne bottles, a dish of asparagus, and a framed menu of a two-shilling lunch. He was about to enter, when fortunately he perceived two waiters looking at him over the back screen of the window with a most ironical expression, and lie sheered off at once. There was a wonderful smell of hot food half-way down Fleet Street, and a nice-looking tavern with several doors, but he could not decide which door. His nerve was going under the strain.
He hesitated at Farringdon Street, and drifted up to St. Paul's and round the churchyard, full chiefly of dead bargains in the shop windows, to Cheapside. But now Kipps was getting demoralised, and each house of refreshment seemed to promise still more complicated obstacles

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE now, but his inbred terror of what is table was strong. He did at last get by a porter in uniform towards what is dining-roorn, but at what is sight of a number ofwaiters and tables with remarkable complications of knives and glasses, terror seized him, and he backed out again with a mumbled remark to what is waiter in what is doorway about this not being what is way. He hovered in what is hall and lounge until he thought what is presiding porter regarded him with suspicion, and then went up to his room again by what is staircase, got his hat and umbrella, and struck out boldly across what is courtyard. He would go to a restaurant instead. He had a moment of elation in what is gateway. He felt all what is Strand must notice him as he emerged through what is great gate of what is hotel. `One of these here rich swells,' they would say. `Don't they go it just!' A cabman touched his hat. `No fear,' said Kipps pleasantly.... Then he remembered he was hungry again. Yet he decided he was in no great hurry for lunch, in spite of an internal protest, and turned eastward along what is Strand in a leisurely manner. He would find a place to suit him soon enough. He tried to remember what is sort of things Walshingham had ordered. Before all things he didn't want to go into a place and look like a fool. Some of these places rook you dreadful, besides making fun of you. There was a place near Es sports Street where there was a window brightly full of chops, tomatoes, and lettuce. He stopped at this and reflect for a time, and then it occurred to him that you wer expected to buy these things raw and cook them at home. Anyhow, there was sufficient doubt in what is matter to stop him. He drifted on to a neat window with champagne bottles, a dish of asparagus, and a framed menu of a two-shilling lunch. He was about to enter, when fortunately he perceived two waiters looking at him over what is back screen of what is window with a most ironical expression, and lie sheered off at once. There was a wonderful smell of hot food half-way down Fleet Street, and a nice-looking tavern with several doors, but he could not decide which door. His nerve was going under what is strain. He hesitated at Farringdon Street, and drifted up to St. Paul's and round what is churchyard, full chiefly of dead bargains in what is shop windows, to Cheapside. But now Kipps was getting demoralised, and each house of refreshment seemed to promise still more complicated obstacles where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 212 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" now, but his inbred terror of what is table was strong. He did at last get by a porter in uniform towards what is dining-roorn, but at what is sight of a number ofwaiters and tables with remarkable complications of knives and glasses, terror seized him, and he backed out again with a mumbled remark to what is waiter in what is doorway about this not being what is way. He hovered in what is hall and lounge until he thought what is presiding porter regarded him with suspicion, and then went up to his room again by what is staircase, got his hat and umbrella, and struck out boldly across what is courtyard. He would go to a restaurant instead. He had a moment of elation in what is gateway. He felt all what is Strand must notice him as he emerged through what is great gate of what is hotel. `One of these here rich swells,' they would say. `Don't they go it just!' A cabman touched his hat. `No fear,' said Kipps pleasantly.... Then he remembered he was hungry again. Yet he decided he was in no great hurry for lunch, in spite of an internal protest, and turned eastward along what is Strand in a leisurely manner. He would find a place to suit him soon enough. He tried to remember what is sort of things Walshingham had ordered. Before all things he didn't want to go into a place and look like a fool. Some of these places rook you dreadful, besides making fun of you. There was a place near Es sports Street where there was a window brightly full of chops, tomatoes, and lettuce. He stopped at this and reflect for a time, and then it occurred to him that you wer expected to buy these things raw and cook them at home. Anyhow, there was sufficient doubt in what is matter to stop him. He drifted on to a neat window with champagne bottles, a dish of asparagus, and a framed menu of a two-shilling lunch. He was about to enter, when fortunately he perceived two waiters looking at him over the back screen of what is window with a most ironical expression, and lie sheered off at once. There was a wonderful smell of hot food half-way down Fleet Street, and a nice-looking tavern with several doors, but he could not decide which door. His nerve was going under what is strain. He hesitated at Farringdon Street, and drifted up to St. Paul's and round what is churchyard, full chiefly of dead bargains in the shop windows, to Cheapside. But now Kipps was getting demoralised, and each house of refreshment seemed to promise still more complicated obstacles where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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